Where to buy gas masks for your reporting staff in Ferguson

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Who got arrested in Ferguson last night? Getty Images photographer Scott Olson. (Poynter) | Intercept reporter Ryan Devereaux (The Intercept) | Devereaux “was shot with rubber bullets/beanbags by police last night, spent night in jail. Is due to be released w/o charge soon.” (@the_intercept) | German reporters Ansgar Graw and Frank Hermann. (The Local) | “On Monday, The Washington Post, following the lead of other news organizations, began outfitting its employees with gas masks, purchased at a chain hardware store.” (WP) | Amazon has a pretty good selection of gas masks, some of which are eligible for Prime.
  2. St. Louis Post-Dispatch front page: “Streets Flare Up,” with stunning photo by David Carson (via Newseum) | Carson talked with Kristen Hare last week about covering the unrest in Ferguson. (Poynter) | Hare’s Twitter list of journalists covering Ferguson. (The list keeps changing! Let her know if someone’s missing/no longer there: khare@poynter.org.) | Interesting take: “I believe that publishing unedited images of Ferguson’s demonstrators engaged in possibly criminal behavior — including breaking curfew — is a breach of journalistic ethics.” (Al Jazeera America)
  3. R.I.P. Don Pardo: The NBC announcer and longtime voice of “Saturday Night Live” was 96. (LAT) | When Pardo joined NBC as a radio announcer in 1944, he “also played the role of engineer, getting the radio programs going and cuing up the right bits at the right time. If you could not do those chores, he said, you would not last as a radio announcer.” (NYT)
  4. Some NFL announcers won’t say Redskins’ name: Phil Simms (CBS) and Tony Dungy (NBC) say they won’t use it. “CBS is allowing its announcers to decide on their own whether to call the team the Redskins. So is Fox, which handles the NFC and will televise most of Washington’s games.” (AP) | My list of outlets and journalists who won’t use the term. (Poynter)
  5. Time Inc. rates employees based on how friendly their content is to advertisers: “Writers who may have high assessments for their writing ability, which is their job, were in fact terminated based on the fact the company believed their stories did not ‘produce content that is beneficial to advertiser relationships,’” Guild rep Anthony Napoli tells Hamilton Nolan. (Gawker) | “In a statement, Sports Illustrated said the guild’s interpretation was ‘misleading and takes one category out of context.’” (NYT)
  6. Newsweek builds up Web staff: Its print strategy in place, the magazine is staffing up on digital, Joe Pompeo reports: “The idea is to supplement magazine content, which is only available online to paying subscribers, while building up traffic that can service banner ads and sponsorships.” (Capital)
  7. Medill changes JR program: “The two new choices allow students to choose their own site, which Medill has to approve beforehand, or students can use an existing internship or fellowship to complete their JR requirement, even if it is done over the summer.” (The Daily Northwestern) | Last option is “biggest change,” a tipster tells Jim Romenesko: “Most seniors have completed 2+ internships excluding JR, so we’ve long griped about paying full tuition to add one more internship to our resumes.” (Romenesko) | Taylor Miller Thomas, who did a JR at Poynter, wrote about the strain of journalism internships last year. (Poynter)
  8. Your newsroom needs an audience development person: When Slate hired Katherine Goldstein, “we all had a lot to learn about traffic online, and she taught us about SEO, social,” Editor Julia Turner tells Lucia Moses. “What’s changed is, everyone in house is on board and understands that their primary job is to write great stories, but finding an audience is their job as well.” (Digiday)
  9. How depressing is the U.K. journalism market? “Frankly, moving abroad was the best thing we could have done, given the bloodbath of the UK media market, falling sales and job losses in recent times,” former Birmingham Mail journo Andy Probert tells Nick Hudson. Probert now works in Turkey. (HoldTheFrontPage.co.uk)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Keil will be a reporter for WOFL in Orlando. Previously, she was a reporter at WXIN in Indianapolis. Brooks Tomlin will be the station’s weekend, evening and morning meteorologist. Previously, he worked at the Commercial Weather Services of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Australia. (TV Spy) | Elizabeth Saab and Nick Spinetto will be reporters for KTBC in Austin, Texas. Saab was previously a multimedia journalist for Foxnews.com and Spinetto was a reporter at WMUR in Manchester, New Hampshire. (Austin360.com) | Evan White will be a reporter at WFSB. Previously, he was a reporter and fill-in anchor at WHAM in Rochester, New York. (The Laurel) | Anne McNamara is the host of The Now in Denver. Previously, she was an anchor at WAVY in Norfolk, Virginia. (TV Spy) | Job(s) of the day: The Daily Dot is hiring a morning and an evening editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Correction: This post originally spelled Phil Simms’ first name with an extra “l.”

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