Articles about "Aaron Kushner"


University of Georgia j-school rescinds invitation to Liberian journalist

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. University of Georgia panics, rescinds invitation to Liberian journalist: It canceled Wade C.L. Williams‘ invitation to speak Oct. 23. “It just became abundantly clear we had a risk scenario and a situation on our hands that was a little more sensitive issue,” Grady College dean Charles N. Davis tells Brad Schrade. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution) | Williams: “A woman with a pleasant voice delicately told me that parents were panicking and the general public was against my coming to the university.” (FrontPageAfrica) | What sort of lecture was UGA planning? “Ebola in humans is spread only through direct contact with virus-laden bodily fluids, and is not as transmissible as such airborne viruses as influenza and measles.” (WP) | Related: Why Guardian journalist Monica Mark decided not to wear a hazmat suit while reporting on Ebola: “It’s really difficult to get someone to open up to when you’re wearing it.” (IBT)
  2. The ethics of the Guardian’s Whisper scoop: Was it OK for it to report on something it learned during a meeting about a potential partnership? (Re/code) | Whisper’s responses to Guardian story. (Scribd) | “Part of the problem with the Guardian‘s coverage, [Editor-in-Chief Neetzan] Zimmerman said — and that done by other media as well — is that it doesn’t distinguish between anonymity and privacy.” (Gigaom) | Sort-of related: Gawker Media mulls a Twitter policy. (Jim Romenesko)
  3. Virginian-Pilot shrinks its newsroom: About a quarter of its journalists are going, they learned Friday. “Those leaving include veterans in reporting, column writing, editing, photography and design,” Philip Walzer reports. “The company declined to publicly identify them.” (Virginian-Pilot)
  4. NYT public editor sees some progress: Margaret Sullivan looks back on her second year on the job and spies less false balance, more environment coverage, a commitment to staff diversity. “We’re not going to stop hiring — I don’t believe in hiring freezes,” Executive Editor Dean Baquet tells her. (NYT)
  5. William Luther Masingill dies at 92: The Chattanooga broadcaster “first sat down behind the radio microphone on December 31, 1940. He personally signed on WDEF Television in April of 1954, and over the decades, informed and entertained generations of listeners and viewers alike with a charm and grace unique to him alone.” (WDEF)
  6. What the Boston Herald hasn’t learned from its cartoon blunder: It won’t discuss its staff’s diversity. “In journalism, staff diversity isn’t just about soothing hurt feelings or avoiding embarrassment; it’s a journalistic value,” Eric Deggans writes. “Few quality newspapers would shrug off conditions where they published 10 factual errors a day. So its time to realize diversity is an important a tool for delivering accuracy and context to all kinds of coverage.” (NPR)
  7. Aaron Kushner says LAT is “spreading rumors about us”: The OC Register owner “emphasized last week that his papers remained on a path of success and said he stepped down as publisher of The Orange County Register — and brought in Richard Mirman, a former executive at Harrah’s Entertainment, as interim publisher — because he had too many jobs to handle.” (NYT)
  8. Rewrite that sentence! Book blurb in NYT marries Ann Patchett to her dog. (NYT) | “Sparky’s great, but they’re just friends.” (@GilbertLiz)
  9. Front page of the day, not curated by Kristen Hare: An insta-classic New York Daily News swipe at Donald Trump: “Trumpty Dumpty.” (Courtesy Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Holly Gauntt is now news director for KDVR/KWGN in Denver. Previously, she was news director for KOMO in Seattle. Sarah Garza is interim news director for KOMO. Previously, she was assistant news director there. Nick McDermott is now executive producer at KTVA in Anchorage, Alaska. He has been a producer there. James Doughty is now communications director for a San Antonio city councilman. Previously, he was a reporter for KENS in San Antonio. (Rick Geevers) | Stacy-Marie Ishmael will head up editorial operations for BuzzFeed’s news app. Previously, she was vice president of communities at the Financial Times. (Nieman Lab) | Lindsey Bahr is now a film writer for The Associated Press. Previously, she was a correspondent for Entertainment Weekly. (AP) | Janelle Nanos is now editor of Beta Boston. Previously, she was a senior editor at Boston Magazine. (Muck Rack) | Matthew Schnipper is now a senior editor at GQ. Previously, he was editor-in-chief at Fader. (email) | Terry Savage is now a contributor at Tribune Content Agency. Previously, she was a columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times. (Robert Feder) | Job of the day: the AP is looking for a news research manager in New York. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Correction: This roundup originally linked to a story about Virginian-Pilot layoffs from last year. That planned round of reductions was targeted mostly outside the paper’s newsroom, the story said. Read more

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Jeff Bezos

Newspaper distributor to do same-day delivery for Amazon

mediawiremorningIt’s Thursday. Here’s a pop quiz: How many media stories do you think you’re about to get?

  1. UK newspaper distributor will do same-day Amazon deliveries: “Connect Group will make early morning deliveries at the same time as it delivers daily newspapers and use contractors to fulfill a second delivery in the afternoon.” Connect distributes The Guardian and The Mirror, Rory Gallivan reports. (Wall Street Journal)
  2. Longtime S.F. Chronicle editor William German dies at 95: “Mr. German began his career at the paper as a copy boy. When he retired 62 years later, he was the dean of West Coast editors. He had helped transform The Chronicle from the No.3 newspaper in a four-newspaper city to the largest paper in Northern California.” (San Francisco Chronicle)
  3. BBC battles Ebola in Africa with WhatsApp: “The service will deliver information on preventative care, health tips and breaking news bulletins specific to the region about the virus in French and English, and often in audio formats,” writes Alastair Reid. (Journalism.co.uk) | Related: 5 tips on covering Ebola from the Dallas Morning News and KERA News. (Poynter) | Related: 5 Ebola falsehoods, via PunditFact. (Poynter)
  4. Ken Doctor on Kushner’s OC Register: “Aaron Kushner, by age 40, may be setting a land-speed record for entry, meteoric rise, embarrassing fall and exit from the newspaper industry.” (Nieman Lab) | Related: A lawsuit filed by the Los Angeles Times alleges not only that Kushner has failed to pay more than $2 million owed to the Times for delivery services, but also that the Register kept tips intended for the LA Times newspaper carriers who delivered the Register. (OC Weekly) | Related: “I admired his daring approach, his insistence that investing in newspapers rather than constantly cutting them back and weakening them would give them a better chance to prevail in the digital age,” Rem Rieder writes. (USA Today)
  5. Another alt-weekly closes: The Knoxville News Sentinel, which owns the Metro Pulse, laid off all 23 staffers, including everyone at the alt-weekly. “Yes, it’s true. We don’t exist anymore. We no longer have jobs either. This week’s issue will be our last,” Metro Pulse wrote on its Facebook page. (Poynter)
  6. Indianapolis TV news crew carjacked: No one was hurt after the van was stolen by a gunman after a reporter and photographer for WXIN covered a prayer vigil. (Fox59)
  7. Ernie Pyle statue has a misspelling: The Indiana University alum who covered World War II is referred to as a “U.S. War Corespondent.” The sculptor says it could become “part of the lore of the piece.” (Indiana Daily Student)
  8. ICYMI: At the Washington Post, “what began as a simple experiment to improve the site’s author pages has evolved into the beginnings of a completely new content management platform,” explains Benjamin Mullin. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Kansas City Star celebrates the Royals’ trip to the World Series (courtesy the Newseum).kansascitystar
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ryan Kellett is now audience and engagement editor at The Washington Post. Previously, he was national digital editor there. (The Washington Post) | Dean Haddock is a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He is director of web and information technology for StoryCorps. Melody Joy Kramer is a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is an editor and digital strategist at NPR. Donna Pierce is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is a contributing editor at Upscale Magazine. Jack Riley is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He is head of audience development for The Huffington Post UK. Freek Staps is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He heads up business news start-up NRC Q. Amy Webb is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is the founder and CEO of Webbmedia Group. (Nieman Lab) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed UK is looking for a political reporter. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Men’s Health demonstrates how not to talk about sports with anyone

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. CNN will cut 300 jobs: About 130 people have taken buyouts, and 170 more will be laid off, Brian Stelter reports. Parent Turner Broadcasting plans to lay off 1,475 people. (CNN) | “Turner said it was adding 150 employees in growth areas.” (NYT)
  2. How not to talk about sports with anyone: Men’s Health tweeted an image of a woman holding a foam finger under the legend “How to Talk about Sports with Women.” The link led to a slight Teresa Sabga story called “The Secret to Talking Sports with Any Woman.” The mag apologized on Twitter: “It missed the mark and the negative feedback is justified. We’ve deleted it.” (@MensHealthMag) | A brief selection of reactions: “is this a joke?” (@AishaS) | “hi @MensHealthMag, you don’t know me, but i run @ESPNMag’s annual analytics issue. also, i have a vagina!” (@megreenwell) | “The article (article?) itself is 100 words of non-advice.” (The Daily Dot)
  3. College rescinds George Will’s speaking engagement: Scripps College uninvited Will from speaking at the all-women school. Will wrote a stupid column about sexual assault earlier this year. “They didn’t say that the column was the reason, but it was the reason,” Will told Brad Richardson. He was due to speak at the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Public Affairs Program, which aims to “bring speakers to campus whose political views differ from the majority of students.” (The Claremont Independent) | The St. Louis Post-Dispatch dumped Will’s column last June. “The column was offensive and inaccurate; we apologize for publishing it,” Tony Messenger wrote. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | An all-male cast of editors handled the column. (WP)
  4. L.A. Times says Aaron Kushner owes it millions: It stopped delivering the Orange County Register (and the now-shuttered Los Angeles Register) in L.A., telling Gustavo Arellano the Register “has, for more than a year and a half, been consistently late in paying money it owes The Times for services rendered.” (OC Weekly) | “The shame about the U.S. economy in the 2000s is that it’s been marked by a dearth of Aaron Kushners.” (Forbes)
  5. Scammers target Denver Post subscribers: “The notices offer one-year renewals to The Denver Post for the low, low price of only $489.95, which equates to 410 percent more than the actual current amount for The Post’s All Access Plus digital replica subscription and about 71 percent more than a new seven-day print subscription.” (The Denver Post) | Subscribers of several McClatchy papers, including The Sacramento Bee and the Charlotte Observer, have also been hit. (Sac Bee) | OOF: “Criminals should get -30- to life.” (@jfdulac)
  6. Amazon will help spread Washington Post content: A Kindle app, free for those who buy a certain model and paid for those who buy others, “will offer a curated selection of news and photographs from the daily newspaper in a magazine-style, tablet-friendly format.” (Bloomberg Businessweek) | “[I]f it increases the Post‘s reach (either for readers or advertisers, or both) and it doesn’t cost Amazon or Bezos too much, then it is a slam-dunk.” (Gigaom) | “Honest question: How many of you are listening to U2’s new album because Apple forced it into your iTunes library?” (@dylanbyers) | (Honest answer: I gave it many chances but still can’t recall most of the songs.) | Marginally related: Margaret Sullivan looked at whether NYT has covered Amazon v. Hachette fairly. (NYT) | FLASHBACK: Times reporter David Streitfeld on Amazon: “They don’t care if they’re liked, or even if they’re understood. That makes them challenging to write about.” (Poynter)
  7. Lessons from The New Yorker’s Web redesign: “Right on down to the font choice and page breaks, every decision we made, we first asked ourselves, ‘How will this affect whether or not people will read a story from beginning to the end?’” NewYorker.com Editor Nicholas Thompson tells John Brownlee. (Fast Company)
  8. A meh-moir: An oral history of the NYT’s Meh List. “[N]o one lived it like Mark Leibovich, who developed a sixth sense for meh.” By Samantha Henig, with additional reporting and user experience by Jon Kelly. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Asheville (North Carolina) Citizen-Times greets autumn, beautifully. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Gillen is now executive editor of news enterprise at Bloomberg News. Previously, he was deputy business editor of enterprise at The New York Times. (Politico) | Loren Mayor is now chief operating officer for NPR. Previously, she was senior vice president of strategy there. (Poynter) | Mike Grunwald will be a senior staff writer at Politico magazine. He is a senior national correspondent for Time magazine. (Playbook) | Weston Phippen is now a reporter for the National Journal. Previously, he was a staff writer at the Tampa Bay Times. Lauren Fox will be a Congress reporter at the National Journal. Previously, she was a political reporter at U.S. News and World Report. (Email) | Mark Brackenbury has been named executive editor for the Connecticut Group at Digital First Media. He is managing editor for the New Haven Register. (New Haven Register) | Colleen Noonan has been named vice president of marketing and creative service for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was a digital media and marketing consultant at Pitney Bowes. Melanie Schnuriger is now vice president of product development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was general manager of fashion and beauty for Hearst Digital Media. Kristen Lee is director of digital development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was digital integration editor there. Brad Gerick is now director of social media for the New York Daily News. He has been social media manager and regional editor for Patch.com. Zach Haberman is now deputy managing editor for digital at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was digital news editor there. Cristina Everett is now deputy managing editor for digital entertainment at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was senior digital entertainment editor there. Andy Clayton is now deputy managing editor for digital sports at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was senior online sports editor there. Christine Roberts is mobile and emerging products editor at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was an associate homepage editor there. (Email) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed is looking for a National LGBT Reporter. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org
    Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.
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Los Angeles Register

As L.A. Register closes, owner offers another definition of failure

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Los Angeles Register closes: O.C. Register owner Aaron Kushner immediately ceases publication of the newspaper, which launched in April. “Pundits and local competitors who have closely followed our entry into Los Angeles will be quick to criticize our decision to launch a new newspaper and they will say that we failed,” a memo says. “We believe, the true definition of failure is not taking bold steps toward growth.” (LAT) | That notable bit of Kushner-speak has echoes in this amazing quote from him following buyouts in June: “Everyone says our strategy has failed. Perhaps they should be saying that our strategy has not succeeded?” (OC Weekly) | Another quote! Kushner on the the L.A. Register’s launch: “Only in the newspaper business would someone criticize a business for opening in a market of 10 million people with a great quality product.” (Los Angeles Register) | Justin Ellis called this one yesterday. (Nieman)
  2. NYT debuts “Watching” feature on homepage: A feed on its desktop and mobile homepages “offers a tailored feed of the news of the moment, such as early outlines of developing stories on NYTimes.com and curation of the most newsworthy and trusted reporting from around the web. It also features tweets from Times reporters and others, as well as photos and YouTube videos.” The content “follows the same standards of The Times’s news report. For example, its editors will indicate when a story is developing or when specific news that is being reported is still being verified by The Times newsroom.” (NYT Co.)
  3. Atlantic Media shuts down The Wire: The publication’s staff will be integrated into The Atlantic’s, J.K. Trotter reports. (Gawker) | “Former Gawker editor in chief Gabriel Snyder was hired in 2011 to run the site, which he did until he left at the beginning of the year. In June, news editor Dashiell Bennett was named The Wire’s editor in chief. Most of the current staff, including Mr. Bennett, will run TheAtlantic.com’s news coverage.” (New York Observer) | “Atlantic Media plans to retain The Wire’s homepage and social media feeds, which will be used to highlight Atlantic.com news stories.” (Capital) | “The Wire shutting down should serve as a reminder what a remarkable story of staying power Gawker Media is.” (@jbenton)
  4. Tribune Media Co. prepares for to join stock exchange: The now-newspaperless entity files plans to become fully publicly traded. Besides its broadcast holdings, Tribune Media’s real estate division owns 80 properties; its biggest tenant is Tribune Publishing. (Chicago Tribune) | Tribune Media CEO Peter Liguori made $8.8 million last year. Plus: Paydays for other execs. (Robert Feder)
  5. Alessandra Stanley didn’t think readers would take her seriously: “I didn’t think Times readers would take the opening sentence literally because I so often write arch, provocative ledes that are then undercut or mitigated by the paragraphs that follow,” the NYT critic tells Public Editor Margaret Sullivan about an article that is driving lots of people bonkers. Sullivan: “The Times has significant diversity among its high-ranking editors and prominent writers, but it’s troubling that with 20 critics, not one is black and only two are persons of color.” (NYT) | “If all your readers are somehow ‘missing the point,’ then the problem is you and your writing, not us.” (Jezebel) | “Why write a lede at all if your goal in the body of the piece is to undercut it?” (WP)
  6. Ferguson Fergs onward: The city of Ferguson, Missouri, alerted reporters to plans for town hall meetings, then banned reporters from the meetings (saying that was Justice Department policy), then canceled one “to simplify things for residents.” (WP) | “Dena Iverson, a Justice Department spokeswoman, did not respond to an email on Saturday, asking about whether the department would be checking ID’s at the door.” (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
  7. Queens publisher disputes cops’ entertaining account of her arrest: Forum publisher Patricia Adams “was arrested Thursday after an altercation with her neighbor led her to drive her car into a tree on his lawn,” Eli Rosenberg reports. Police say she told them, “Do you know who the f— I am? I run The Forum, I’m going to have your job. F— you.” Adams told Rosenberg she’s “not a thug,” never drove on her neighbor’s lawn and will “beware not to believe everything I read in a criminal complaint.” She plans to write about the incident. (NYDN)
  8. Geezers found geezing: Cory Blair profiles Baltimore’s Aging Newspapermen’s Club, whose members gather weekly. “‘Are you writing obituaries?’ asks the gentleman sitting across from me. ‘If so, you’re a few weeks early.’” (AJR)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The Tampa Tribune references the White House’s fence troubles as it trumpets news of bombings in Syria.

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Adam Sachs is now editor-in-chief of Saveur. He is currently editorial director of TastingTable. (New York Times) | Will Lee is now editor of People.com. Previously, he was vice president for digital content for The Hollywood Reporter. (The New York Times) | Jane Armstrong is now editor-in-chief at The Tyee. She was a reporter and editor at OpenFile. (The Tyee) | Randy Gyllenhaall is a reporter at WCAU in Philadelphia. Previously, he was a reporter at WPBF in South Florida. Mitch Blacher will be an investigative reporter at WCAU. Previously, he was an investigative reporter at KGTV in San Diego. (TV Spy) | Job of the Day: The San Antonio Express-News is looking for a sports editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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The Day in Digital: Inside the New York Times CMS and the impending Amazon phone

Content management systems are so in this season. Luke Vnenchak has a fascinating look inside Scoop, The New York Times’s “homegrown digital and (soon-to-be) print CMS.”

Jeff Bezos is expected to announce an Amazon smartphone today. How can the company compete with Apple, Android and Samsung? Quartz’s Dan Frommer has some thoughts on the strategy.

The Atlantic’s in good shape, for lots of reasons. Here’s another one, from a Jeff Sonderman tweet during American Press Institute’s summit on video:

Media critics weren’t critical enough of Aaron Kushner’s print-centric strategy at the Orange County Register, Clay Shirky writes, helping to poison the minds of young people who need to understand that print is in a death spiral from which it can’t recover.

“Do you really need another app for sharing photos and videos with your friends?” Ina Fried asks at Re/code as Facebook releases its new Snapchat competitor, Slingshot.

At PBS MediaShift, Dorian Benkoil explores efforts by Chartbeat, Upworthy, the Financial Times and more to measure “what advertisers and publishers really want — people actually paying attention.”

Yahoo revealed its worldwide workplace diversity. Employees are overwhelmingly white and Asian, and 62 percent male.


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Not accurate to say OC Register strategy has failed, owner says: It has ‘not succeeded’

OC Weekly | Los Angeles Times

In a meeting with employees Monday to discuss buyouts, Orange County Register owner Aaron Kushner said, “Everyone says our strategy has failed. Perhaps they should be saying that our strategy has not succeeded?” Gustavo Arellano has a recording of the session.

About 50 people applied for the buyouts, “which would come with severance pay of as much as 20 weeks’ salary,” Stuart Pfeifer reports in the Los Angeles Times. That was more volunteers than Kushner was expecting, Arellano reported Monday. (He’s also got a list going of people he says are taking the buyouts.)

The Register’s ownership “expects to eliminate 20 to 100 jobs,” Ricardo Lopez and Stuart Pfeifer reported in the Los Angeles Times last week.

The Register is also requiring two-week furloughs from employees, Ricardo Lopez and Andrew Khouri reported last week, and it will fold its Long Beach coverage into its new Los Angeles edition. The Long Beach Press Telegram/Long Beach Register newspaper war is effectively over. Read more

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Kushner: ‘Only in the newspaper business’ would L.A. Register’s launch draw criticism

Los Angeles Register | LA Observed | Associated Press | Reuters

The Los Angeles Register launches Wednesday. Owners Aaron Kushner and Eric Spitz “are hand-delivering copies of the newspaper on Wednesday to business and civic leaders across Los Angeles,” the paper says in a press release.

Wednesday’s L.A. Register (photograph by Sandee Oshiro)

The paper promises heavy local coverage and opinion columnists who “will bring a right-of-center perspective and engage in civil debate,” as well as “more than a dozen new community editions,” the release says. Some of the staff moving north from the Register’s homebase in Orange County, where Kushner publishes the Orange County Register, include sports columnist T.J. Simers; food writers Brad A. Johnson, Nancy Luna and Cathy Thomas; and film critic Michael Sragow. Read more

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Freedom Communications’ Los Angeles Register to launch mid-April

Freedom Communications | Orange County Register

Freedom Communications’ challenge to the Los Angeles Times — the Los Angeles Register — will soft launch on April 16, the company announced Monday. The company also plans to introduce roughly a dozen community papers throughout Los Angeles County.

Over 7,500 retail and news rack locations will carry the Register at $1.50 on weekdays and $2 on Saturdays and Sundays, the company said. Home delivery will follow at an initial four-week subscription rate of $19.99.

According to a company statement:

“The Los Angeles Register will deliver community-building information about local activities, people and issues that impact our lives every day,” said Aaron Kushner, co-owner of Freedom Communications and Publisher of the Los Angeles Register. “Newspapers play an incredibly vital role in the social fabric of our lives- informing, inspiring and connecting us with our community. The Los Angeles Register and our community newspapers serving Los Angeles will focus on creating deep and meaningful local connections, as it is this type of bond and mission that helps subscribers, advertisers and our community itself thrive.”

In December, Kushner told the staff of the Orange County Register that the new paper will have “not quite the heft of the Orange County Register” and will be produced by the O.C. Register’s existing staff. Read more

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O.C. Register owner plans new daily paper in Los Angeles

Orange County Register | Los Angeles Times | KPCC

Orange County Register owner Aaron Kushner plans to launch a daily paper in Los Angeles called the Los Angeles Register. He told staff of his plans in a meeting Thursday, Mary Ann Milbourn reports.

The new paper will have “not quite the heft of the Orange County Register,” Kushner said, and it will be produced by the O.C. Register’s existing staff, Milbourn reports. It will have an L.A. office, he told Milbourn.

Kushner told the Los Angeles Times’ Andrea Chang the new paper will “hire editorial staff externally and transfer some existing employees to the L.A. office.”

The paper will be distributed to the “entire Los Angeles area,” a Freedom Communications spokesperson told Wendy Lee. Read more

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Providence Journal may be sold

The Providence Journal | A.H. Belo | WPRI

Providence Journal Publisher Howard G. Sutton told employees Wednesday morning that the paper’s owner, A.H. Belo, is exploring a sale of the publication, Paul Edward Parker reports.

Selling the newspaper “would allow the Company to continue to focus resources and management time and attention on its core Dallas market,” an A.H. Belo press release says. The company also owns The Dallas Morning News and the Denton Record-Chronicle. It recently sold The (Riverside, Calif.) Press-Enterprise to Aaron Kushner.

The Journal’s average Sunday circulation was 105,810 in September, down 11 percent from the previous year. Its average weekday circulation was 106,605, down about 7 percent from September 2012. The paper’s “advertising revenue has plunged 66% since 2005, falling to $46 million last year,” WPRI’s Ted Nesi reports. The paper offered buyouts in September, and 12 people took them. In April, the Journal named Karen A. Bordeleau its executive editor.

“Company officials cautioned that it wouldn’t sell The Journal if it could not find an appropriate buyer or could not come to acceptable terms with a would-be buyer,” Parker writes. Read more

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