Articles about "Advance"


simone-camilli

AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden. (Wired)
  3. Gawker covers BuzzFeed: BuzzFeed has removed nearly 5,000 old posts, some of which “clearly veered into plagiarism territory,” J.K. Trotter writes. (Gawker) | Yowch: “BuzzFeed divorces its first wife.” (@pbump) | Kelly McBride: “Taking articles down is a rare phenomenon among trustworthy institutions, and it should be executed in the full light of day.” (Poynter)
  4. BuzzFeed covers Gawker: In response to staff complaints about violent porn posted in comments, Gawker Media banned images from its Kinja platform. Kinja, Myles Tanzer reports, “is still mystifying employees and creating tensions between the company’s editorial staff and top executives.” (BuzzFeed) | Jezebel EIC Jessica Coen calls the image-banning move an insufficient “temporary band-aid.” (Poynter) | Nicholas Jackson suggests Gawker Media should “Shut down Kinja completely.” (It’s important to note here that Kinja is also Gawker Media’s CMS.) Comments, he writes, “just don’t belong at the end of or alongside posts … They belong on personal blogs, or on Twitter or Tumblr or Reddit, where individuals build a full, searchable body of work and can be judged accordingly.” (Pacific Standard)
  5. Alt-weeklies benefit from Advance’s changes: Publishers of Willamette Week, Lagniappe and Syracuse New Times have staffed up and seen growth in the wake of changes at daily papers in their cities. (AAN) | Related: Readership, alliances up at other New Orleans news outlets in last year (Poynter)
  6. MoJo’s Facebook mojo: Mother Jones engagement editor Ben Dreyfuss decided to “double down on Facebook,” Caroline O’Donovan writes, and has seen notable returns. “From what we hear, Facebook is privileging certain kinds of content-rich sites,” MoJo publisher Steve Katz says. (Nieman) | Related: “While many people now find their news on Facebook, it’s easy to forget that very recently they found it on Google, and will surely find it somewhere else in the not-too-distant future.” (NYT) | Also related: Facebook has seen many more publishers embed its posts since it launched FB Newswire. (Poynter)
  7. More BS television: Bill Simmons plans to launch “The Grantland Basketball Show” on ESPN. (The Big Lead)
  8. Journalists injured in Iraq: New York Times reporter Alissa J. Rubin, Adam Ferguson, a photographer freelancing for the Times, and Moises Saman, who was on assignment for Time, were injured in a helicopter crash in northern Iraq Tuesday. The pilot was killed. (NYT) | Saman’s pictures from the crash. (Time)
  9. Jobs still available in journalism: Dale Eisinger says he worked for “the New York office of a conservative media company based in the South,” where his charge was “to trawl Twitter, and the rest of the internet, for conspiracy and evidence of liberal malice. Then, to repackage these stories or posts or memes for the target demo.” (The Awl)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Adam Serwer will be national editor at BuzzFeed. Currently, he’s a reporter at MSNBC (Poynter) | Edith Zimmerman has been named senior staff writer for Matt Taibbi’s as yet unnamed magazine. She founded The Hairpin. Laura Dawn, former creative and cultural director for moveon.org, will be the magazine’s executive director of multimedia. (Poynter) | Dominic Rushe, Alex Needham and Oliver Laughland will each take different jobs at Guardian U.S. Rushe, a business correspondent, will be East Coast technology editor for Guardian U.S. Needham, formerly a culture editor for theguardian.com, will be arts editor for Guardian U.S. Laughland will join Guardian U.S. as a senior reporter. He’s currently a reporter for Guardian Australia. (The Guardian) | Jeanne Cummings will be head of operations for Bloomberg’s forthcoming politics vertical. Previously, she was a deputy editor at Bloomberg News. (Politico) | The Denver Post is looking for a features writer to cover food and lifestyle. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Jennifer Conlin writes about independent student publication The Michigan Daily, which beat local daily The Ann Arbor News on a major story. Since the News underwent several repositionings in the local market, the Daily has been “the only Monday-through-Friday print publication in town”:

The constant changes have muddled The Ann Arbor News’s identity and, according to some residents, eroded its standing as the go-to source of news in the community. That sense was reinforced by the football article, on which The Ann Arbor News played catch-up after student reporters broke the story.

“I feel The Michigan Daily fills an important niche in Ann Arbor and a need that is unmet by our regional newspapers in an era of constrained resources,” said the student paper’s editor in chief, Peter Shahin, sitting with the two reporters who broke the football scandal story, Adam Rubenfire and Matt Slovin, in the Daily’s conference room. …

“We have 200 to 250 staff, and though we are a trade publication first covering the university, we are also trying to fill a void in other areas here, like the arts,” Mr. Shahin said. “I think we truly have the pulse of the town.”

Jennifer Conlin, The New York Times

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A reserved sign and flowers are seen on a table at Holsten's ice cream parlor Thursday, June 20, 2013, in Bloomfield, N.J., with a newspaper announcing the death of actor James Gandolfini. Gandolfini was mourned in the northern New Jersey towns where his TV character Tony Soprano lived, loved and whacked people. The star died Wednesday night in Italy of an apparent heart attack. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Advance laid off more than 300 people in N.J.

The Star-Ledger | The New York Times | The Daily Beast | Philly.com

Some 306 people lost jobs at Advance’s New Jersey properties Thursday, Mark Mueller and Ted Sherman report in The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger. At the Star-Ledger, 167 staffers, 40 of them from the newsroom, were laid off as Advance tries to reposition its newsgathering operations for digital readership.

“Another 124 full- and part-time jobs were eliminated at the company’s weekly newspapers and at the dailies in Trenton, Easton, and South Jersey,” Mueller and Sherman write. “At NJ.com, 15 of 77 employees were let go.”

Matt Kraner, the president of NJ Advance Media, the new company that will provide content and other services to the papers, told The New York Times the group “will be adding 27 editorial positions to increase the numbers of reporters and photographers on the street.” The cuts will nevertheless present “a net reduction in editorial staff,” Ravi Somaiya reports.

When asked whether the moves diminished The Star-Ledger, its publisher, Richard Vezza, said in a phone interview: “I don’t look at it that way. I look at it as a transition to an organization for the future.”

NJ Advance Media will be based in Woodbridge, N.J., Mueller and Sherman report. The Star-Ledger will “remain a presence in Newark, though a vastly diminished one”: Read more

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James Gandolfini Reaction New Jersey_AP

Star-Ledger lays off 167

The Star-Ledger

The (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger will cut about 25 percent of its newsroom today, Ted Sherman and Mark Mueller report. Of the 167 cuts total at the paper, about 40 will come from the newsroom. NJ.com is also being hit.

The Advance-owned paper last week announced the creation of a new company called NJ Advance Media. Following the script set at other Advance properties, the new company will publish the Star-Ledger, NJ.com and other newspapers.

The cuts aren’t necessarily immediate, Sherman and Mueller report:

In packets that were being handed out this morning, those being told their jobs were being eliminated were offered severance packages if they agreed to stay with the newspaper until NJ Advance Media, new media company being formed, is up and running.

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Oregonian goes to smaller print format

The Oregonian

The Oregonian will go from a “broadsheet size to a compact format,” the paper announced Tuesday. The new paper will be “about 15 inches tall by 11 inches wide.” The paper expects to complete its transition to the new format by April 2.

The type size will not change. Local, national and international news will be combined into the main news section. Sports will remain as a stand-alone section, as will Business on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays. On Wednesday, Foodday + Living and health news will be combined into a single features section. On Sundays, the features sections also combine into a single A&E, Living and Travel section.

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Study says quality of content is down at Nola.com

CJR

A Tulane University study says the quality of content has declined at Nola.com since the Times-Picayune decreased print frequency, Dean Starkman writes. The study, on which Starkman consulted, looked at “hard” and “soft” news (including opinion pieces) in the printed paper and online.

While “the 2013 version of the printed Times-Picayune is not terribly different from its predecessor in terms of the type of stories covered,” Starkman writes, the stuff on its digital products “was more likely to be about lighter subjects such as sports and entertainment, as opposed to politics, education, courts and other traditional core newspaper beats.”

Nola Media Group Editor and Vice-President for Content Jim Amoss told Starkman the study’s methodology “doesn’t begin to provide a statistically valid measure of ‘soft’ versus ‘hard’ news” online. The study also found the news organization’s stories are more thinly sourced. Amoss told Starkman stories are often iterative, and an “early, quick dispatch about a trial or a city council meeting will necessarily have fewer sources than its full-fledged version at the end of the day.” Read more

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Advance Local president: ‘signs of success are everywhere’

Privately held Advance has been mostly mum on the results of its cutback of print editions in most markets and the relaunch of its newspapers as digital media companies. But in a year-end letter to employees, Advance Local President Randy Siegel partly answers one key questions skeptics like me have been posing:

Most of our new organizations are rapidly increasing their digital revenue and approaching the point where digital ad revenue growth will be larger than print ad revenue declines. This positions us well for the future given the inexorable shift of print advertising dollars to digital. When we started launching our new companies, growing digital ad revenue faster than losing print ad revenue was one of our preeminent goals and we are getting there sooner than expected. A special shout-out to our sales teams in Michigan, New Orleans and Syracuse where 25-30 percent year-over-year digital gains now seem par for the course.

Siegel also confirms that the print-to-digital strategy is coming to its New Jersey, Massachusetts, Staten Island and  Pennsylvania titles in the New Year. Read more

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Advance considers consolidating operations in N.J. papers

The Star-Ledger

Advance’s New Jersey papers have some “channel conflict,” (Newark, N.J.) Star-Ledger Publisher Richard Vezza tells his paper. So while Vezza stresses that Advance is not thinking about the changes it’s implemented in other markets, like reducing print frequency or home-delivery days, he said “the company is looking at everything, from combining sales forces to how to organize its news operations,” Ted Sherman reports.

This fall, Vezza said he would consider shutting down The Star-Ledger if it couldn’t come to an accommodation with its unions. Read more

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Advance president in Pennsylvania quits to join rival publisher

PennLive | Lancaster Online | The Sentinel

John A. Kirkpatrick will leave the PA Media Group, which publishes The (Harrisburg, Pa.) Patriot-News. He had been president there and will take a similar position at Lancaster Newspapers.

Kirkpatrick was named The Patriot-News’ editor in 1991 and became its publisher in 1997. The paper announced last year it would reduce print frequency and staff, in a manner similar to several other Advance-owned publications.

Lancaster Newspapers “will continue to publish a daily print edition,” Tim Mekeel reports the company’s publisher, Robert M. Krasne, said.

According to the most recent figures at the Alliance for Audited Media, The Patriot-News had total average Sunday circulation of 135,135 (including digital editions) in March and average circulation on the days it published a print paper of 81,301. The (Lancaster, Pa.) Sunday News had average Sunday circulation of 95,222, also including digital editions. The Intelligencer Journal/Lancaster New Era had average Monday-Friday circulation of 75,258.

Related: Pennsylvania paper gains subscribers after Patriot-News reduces print frequency | Pennsylvania newspaper, TV station team to compete with less frequent Patriot-News Read more

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How many top newspaper editors are from digital backgrounds? Still darn few

Upward of 1,400 digital journalists are expected in Atlanta this week for the annual Online News Association conference. That’s fairly close to the number of daily American newspapers, at last count roughly 1,380.

With digital transformation the announced top priority for newspaper companies ranging in size from Gannett to community publishers, you would think by now many would have given the editorial reins to a digital specialist. But top editors with a strong digital background remain rare.

With some rudimentary (and I am sure incomplete) checking, I could only turn up a half dozen or so.

I had noted with interest the announcement a month ago that Neil Budde, top Yahoo news editor in the mid 2000s, had been chosen the new executive editor of Gannett’s Louisville Courier-Journal. I wondered — might Budde be the first at a mid-sized or larger paper?

Not quite, but he is certainly among the pioneers. Another is USA Today’s Editor-in-Chief David Calloway, who had a decade running editorial at Marketwatch and came to Gannett’s national daily in June 2012 shortly after Marketwatch founder and CEO Larry Kramer became USA Today’s publisher.

Without fanfare, Advance has appointed two top editors this year with digital backgrounds to lead newsrooms where the company is making digital the top priority and print frequency has been reduced. Michelle Holmes, a 2012 Knight fellow at Stanford and briefly director of business development for Ustream TV in San Francisco, was named vice-president of content in late April for Advance’s Alabama newspapers and websites.

Then in September, Stephen Cvengros, who had a 16-year career with MSN and other Microsoft publishing ventures, took the same title at Advance’s Syracuse.com and the Syracuse Post Standard.

Also Howard Saltz, editor of Tribune’s Sun-Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale came there in 2011 after a decade overseeing interactive content at MediaNews and, earlier, its flagship Denver Post.

The dean of this select group is Jim Brady, editor-in-chief  for Digital First Media and current ONA president, after stints running editorial for the Washington Post’s website, AOL and then start-up TBD (since closed). Brady is not exactly the editor of a local news operation since he oversees more than 60 of them and other Digital First ventures.

In a brief e-mail exchange, Brady told me that Matt DeRienzio, who runs several of Digital First’s Connecticut newsrooms and a few editors at smaller paper/websites have extensive digital experience.  And Brady volunteered an explanation of why there are not more: “It’s more than being slow. It remains hard to find people who understand digital and who have run newsrooms.”

Managing an accelerated change to digital is difficult whatever the editor’s background.  John Yemma, who has been editing the Christian Science Monitor as a website with a weekly print magazine since spring 2009, described the challenge in a Biz Blog post back then:

The Web is where most of our reporters and editors are having to think in new ways. If you don’t have the daily print production deadlines, you are thinking more like a wire service. How often do you update a story? How long should a post be? How do you track continuous news — and is there a role for the higher level of ordering the news content each day as we used to do in the Page One process? We are in constant conversation about these issues….
It is both an exciting time, and honestly one of some apprehension in the newsroom. Like everyone, we’ve had staff reductions (about 20 percent from last year’s budgeted level), most of which we captured via attrition and voluntary departures. The unknowns of the Web and questions about whether fast, responsive metrics-oriented journalism fits with our journalistic culture of thoughtful perspective abound. No one has answers to these questions, and I’m not pretending I do.

I don’t want to overstate the distinction. All the digitally-oriented editors mentioned above (and Digital First CEO John Paton, for that matter) have substantial experience in print as well. And the more typical top editors, coming up the ranks in print, are embracing digital, learning as fast as they can and leading development of websites and other new products on mobile platforms.

Still, at risk of aligning myself with the newspapers-are-dodos crowd, I do find it odd that so few companies will roll the dice at this juncture with an editor whose primary expertise is digital innovation.

With the ice broken, I would look for Gannett, Advance and Digital First to add to that cadre as top editorial jobs come open. And I am eager to see what changes this first generation of digitally tilting editors can produce. It is worth a check a year hence, but I am pretty sure the industry’s digital talk will still outpace the walk when it comes to editorial control.

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