Articles about "Advertising"


YAHOO!

Newspapers’ ad consortium with Yahoo reboots

An early attempt to boost digital advertising at newspaper organizations by cross-selling local advertising with Yahoo will be attempting an update and relaunch over the next several months.

The goal remains to use the local sales force of 700 participating … Read more

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Ad campaign: Florida has more newspaper readers than alligators

National Newspaper Week begins Oct. 6, and its organizers have released 37 state-specific ads celebrating the Daily Miracles. Most take a fact about the state they serve and compare it to statistics about newspaper readers, such as Louisiana's "Who dat? Dat’s Louisiana’s newspaper readers filling the Superdome 36 times!"

Here are some of my favorite ads from the series. Click to view bigger versions. (more...)
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Business concerns left Washington Post magazine’s education issue with only one education story

The Washington Post
Pressure from The Washington Post's business side bumped two stories from the Post Magazine's Aug. 11 education issue, leaving it with just one story about education. The business people objected to two planned stories, Erik Wemple writes:
One was on college drinking by reporter Jenna Johnson; another was an interview by reporter Nick Anderson with the outgoing College of William and Mary rector about whether Virginia’s public universities would get with the times on benefits for gay and lesbian couples.
Johnson's story ran in a later edition of the magazine; Anderson's ended up in Metro. (more...)
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Monocle EIC: ‘All good journalists are good salespeople too’

Digiday | LinkedIn | iMediaEthics
We absolutely never, ever use the term native advertising,” Monocle Editor-in-Chief Tyler Brûlé tells Alex Kantrowitz about his publication's embrace of branded content.

If the company’s infrastructure blurs the church-and-state divide between editorial and sales, it’s by design. Editors accompany ad directors on sales calls. “I’m of the opinion that all good journalists are good salespeople too,” Brûlé said. While the ad team discusses pricing and tries to close the business, editors give Monocle’s potential clients insight into the publication’s editorial calendar and explain the reasoning behind certain editorial decisions.
The payoff? A campaign for Samsung "brought in roughly one million dollars and native ads can, depending on the month, account for up to one quarter of Monocle’s total revenue," Kantrowitz reports. (more...)
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Advertising

A mid-year question for newspapers: What ails national advertising & can it be fixed?

Gannett kicked off the second-quarter earnings season for newspaper companies Monday, and the mixed results contained a glimmer of potentially good news for the industry.

National advertising for Gannett’s U.S. publishing was up for the quarter compared to the same … Read more

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hand with money

Edelman’s new report suggests an ‘ethical framework’ for paid content

Edelman | Forbes | PRWeek | New York Times | The Atlantic
A new paper by public relations firm Edelman takes on the ethical issues of paid content in an attempt to start a discussion about developing guidelines for this type of content

Chief content strategist Steve Rubel interviewed 30 media companies for the report, released Tuesday, to develop what it calls "an ethical framework" for promoting paid content.

Forbes' Jeff Bercovici summarizes that framework a list of "ideals" that should get the industry talking. Those ideals include disclosure, an opportunity for feedback, and a "non-porous organizational divide between those who produce and place sponsored content and those who work directly with journalists."

Rubel told PRWeek's Sarah Shearman that many companies use their own guidelines when creating paid content, and there is no industry-wide standard. (more...)
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Upworthy, NYT experimenting with new ad formats and revenue models

Digiday | Fast Company | Nieman Journalism Lab
After a dramatic increase in traffic in the last few months, news aggregator Upworthy has begun to experiment with some new advertising models to turn those eyeballs into dollars. Digiday's Josh Sternberg explains:

Upworthy is running an ad program with Skype to distribute advertising videos. For example, here’s a Skype video Upworthy shared of Denis, a man who came to the U.S. from Uganda and couldn’t return. He uses Skype to remain in contact with his family. At the bottom of the post, Upworthy tells its readers the following: “We were paid to promote this ad, but we only do that for things we think are actually Upworthy.”

Upworthy is also selling category sponsorships. For example, in a category of, say, global health, Upworthy would assign a “curator” to find related content, and a sponsor would underwrite that piece of content.

The site started up 14 months ago and now employs five full-time curators and 20 contributors. Its data-driven approach to choosing social content has led some to call it "the fastest growing media site of all time."

Upworthy isn't the only site planning new ad formats; The  New York Times announced Monday it will use some new Idea Lab work to adapt advertising for its iPad app.
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Research reveals ‘key to viral videos’

Harvard Business School
People share videos of ads when doing so makes them look good, according to research by Harvard Business School assistant professor Thales S. Teixeira.

"People watch a lot of things online that they would never share with anyone," Teixeira tells Carmen Nobel.
After comparing the sharing behavior with the emotional responses and personality tests, Teixeira found that the main motivation for viral sharing was egocentricity—the viewer's desire to derive personal gain from sharing the video. In this case, the potential gain comes in the form of improving the viewer's reputation among friends and family, for example. Thus, it behooves advertisers to create videos that not only will make the product look good but, if shared, will make the viewer look good, too.
That aligns with something Jeff Sonderman wrote for Poynter last year about why people share news: "A sharable story doesn’t have to be positive, it just has to be powerful," Sonderman wrote.

It has to create within the reader a deep, authentic human emotion — joy, fear, irony, disgust, wonder.
Or narcissism, apparently. A New York Times marketing study of sharing identified several personality types predisposed toward sharing content, including what it called "Boomerangs": People who share stuff because it reflects well on them.
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Twitter can now target viewers of specific TV shows with ads

Twitter | All Things D | The Wall Street Journal
Twitter will use "video fingerprinting technology" to track who was tweeting about a show, then direct ads to that person.
Whenever a commercial airs during a TV show, Twitter not only determines where and when it ran, but can identify users on Twitter who tweeted about the program where the ad aired during that program. We believe a user engaged enough with a TV show to tweet about it very likely saw the commercials as well.
(more...)
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OC Register drops adult ads

OC Weekly

An Orange County Register spokesperson confirms a report in the OC Weekly that the news organization will no longer accept adult ads.

The Weekly's Gustavo Arellano quoted a letter from Michael H. Burns, The Orange County Register's senior vice president for sales and marketing:
"While we wish you much success in your business, we believe the decision to not accept advertising of this category serves in the best interest of our audience."
Register spokesperson Eric Morgan tells Poynter in an email that the letter went out in late April and was "sent to select businesses who operate gentleman's clubs and massage parlors that include suggestive language such as 'fully nude club,' 'private rooms' and 'sexy girls' to advertise their services." (more...)
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