Articles about "Aggregation"


Joel Achenbach writes about a revelation he had when interviewing a source:

But now I’m wondering if what I consider “reporting” is just a form of aggregating, of skimming, of lifting the best parts of a scientist’s work and repurposing it for my own interests. These scientists have spent many, many years doing research, much of it at the very edge of the knowable, where finding a new piece of solid data is a laborious process that may require long nights at the computer or the laboratory bench, or mulling a bust of Galileo, and this work has to be slotted among other obligations, including grant applications, peer-reviewing papers, teaching, advising graduate students, holding office hours, serving on faculty committees and schmoozing at the faculty club. And here I am calling up and saying: “Give me the fruit of your mental labors.” Asking for the ripest fruit, as it were. Asking not just for information but for wisdom. Give it to me! For free. And they did, because they always do, because we have a system of sorts.

Joel Achenbach, The Washington Post

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3 ways Facebook’s Paper app outperforms other news aggregators (and 3 ways it doesn’t)

Paper, the first app from Facebook’s Creative Labs available now for iPhones, could challenge Flipboard, Zite and Feedly in the business of aggregating news on mobile devices. Not only does it beautify your Facebook newsfeed, but it also … Read more

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Has ‘curate’ replaced ‘aggregate’ as the default term for summarizing other people’s news?

While exploring the new Inside.com app, which collects content from a variety of news organizations and summarizes stories in a maximum of 300 characters, I wasn’t surprised to see the term “curators” in its App Store description.

But I … Read more

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BuzzFeed nemesis says site ripped off his trend story

Death and Taxes | BuzzFeed
Joe Veix says BuzzFeed "posted essentially the same article" he did without crediting him prominently enough.

His Oct. 2 story was about people tweeting photos of themselves falling down stairs. Ryan Broderick wrote a story published the same day called "Teenagers Are Obsessed With Tweeting Photos Of Each Other Falling Down The Stairs" that linked to Veix's story, but not obviously enough, he argues: "Most bloggers have come to an unspoken agreement that you generally cite your sources in the first paragraph with an obvious link, and/or at the bottom of the article (i.e., “via ‘site name’”). BuzzFeed did neither."

BuzzFeed's story received more than 100,000 views, and Veix says his original "received 115 clicks back." (more...)
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Two questions that guide aggregation etiquette

Digiday editor-in-chief Brian Morrissey was getting a little tired of Business Insider aggregating his site's best work and reaping big traffic from it. So he ran some numbers. Morrissey writes that over the past year his website received 8,713 visits and 14,379 pageviews from Business Insider aggregated posts, while the BI site reaped over 90,000 views. Roughly a 5:1 pageview ratio from aggregator to creator. "Is this a fair trade?" he asks. What ensued was a long back-and-forth on Twitter between Morrissey and Business Insider founder Henry Blodget. You should read it for all the context, but basically this dispute (and the others that arise over aggregation from time to time) seems to pivot on two major questions. (more...)
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Why publishers should follow the Verge-HuffPost aggregation dustup

Techdirt | BuzzFeed

It might be hard to understand why staffers at tech site The Verge complained so loudly about a Huffington Post "linkout" that sent readers to a Verge feature. After all, isn't the Web built on such selfless acts of curation?

"I'm sort of at a loss as to how anyone might think that the HuffPo snippet and link takes away from the original," Techdirt Editor Mike Masnick wrote Wednesday.

Also on Wednesday, Huffington Post Senior News Editor Whitney Snyder roared to the defense of his organization's linking practices. (more...)
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HuffPost trims aggregated post after The Verge complains

Miles to go...
The Huffington Post aggregated a Verge enterprise feature on videogame arcades, reproducing the first 239 words of Laura June's Jan. 16 story and directing readers to it via a prominent link on Jan. 21.

That doesn't seem to be the point of friction between the two news orgs, if I'm reading this reconstruction of the feud correctly: Verge Editor-in-Chief Joshua Topolsky lays into HuffPost for "its theft of our SEO on title and text."

Huffington Post Communications Director Rhoades Alderson tells Poynter his news organization calls such posts "linkouts," and passes along some words he sent to The Verge. (more...)
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Quartz’s practice of ‘linking out’ renews attention to aggregation debate

CJR | The New York Times | Knight Science Journalism at MIT | Nieman Journalism Lab
CJR's Hazel Sheffield took a look at the new publication Quartz and didn't like a few things: links take you away from the site, there's no commenting, infographics aren't interactive and It didn't have enough original content when she looked at it.

One example: of the 13 stories that appeared under the heading “Energy Shocks” in the site’s first five hours, eight were either sponsored or aggregated.
With the caveat that I have no idea what "Energy Shocks" are, I view getting five original stories out in five hours as working at a pretty good clip. Quartz Senior Editor Zach Seward responds to Sheffield's dismay about Quartz's linking practices in the comments:

Our goals are just to cite our sources, acknowledge that there's a whole wide world of great business reporting, and point our readers to material they should see. Only CJR could manage to view the presence of links as a sign of weakness. That's kind of perfectly captured by your complaint that some links on Quartz don't open in a new tab by default, "a curious decision by a new site hoping to get people to stick around." Hah! No. We're thrilled if readers leave Quartz because we've pointed them to great material elsewhere because we know they'll love us for it and come back for more.
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Slatest news blog shifts from ‘comprehensive aggregation’ to ‘news companion’

Slate | The Slatest
Slate's news blog, The Slatest, is bringing tighter focus and more editorial voice to its aggregation of daily news. "Starting Monday," innovations editor Katherine Goldstein writes, "The Slatest has a new tagline: 'Your News Companion.' Rather than offering comprehensive aggregation, the new Slatest will highlight the excellent writing and keen editorial voice of Josh Voorhees, who’ll be bringing you definitive insight into the day’s events."

Slatest's last relaunch in April 2011 was aimed at "quickening its pace," and as editor David Plotz explained to CJR, being "a very smart, entertaining brief on the most interesting stories of the day." The Slatest arrived in 2009, as a re-invention of the site's popular feature born 12 years earlier, "Today's Papers." In its first iteration, the Slatest was updated three times a day to reflect what then-Slate media critic Jack Shafer described as the three phases of the news cycle. (more...)
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Elizabeth Flock will blog for U.S. News & World Report

Elizabeth Flock, who resigned from The Washington Post in April after a misattributed blog post drew a gnarly editor's note, has a new gig. She'll be lead writer on U.S. News & World Report's Washington Whispers blog, which was written by Paul Bedard before he decamped for The Washington Examiner.

Reached by phone, Flock mostly referred me to her tweet announcing her new job. She said the social issues piece would mean writing about race, gender and immigration.

Post Ombudsman Patrick Pexton weighed in on Flock's departure in April, saying the paper had failed her. He wrote that he had spoken to other bloggers there.
They said that they felt as if they were out there alone in digital land, under high pressure to get Web hits, with no training, little guidance or mentoring and sparse editing. Guidelines for aggregating stories are almost nonexistent, they said. And they believe that, even if they do a good job, there is no path forward. Will they one day graduate to a beat, covering a crime scene, a city council or a school board? They didn’t know. So some left; others are thinking of quitting.
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