Articles about "Aggregation"


Aggregation is unlike fast food because you rarely write the same thing twice

The Awl
Trevor Butterworth is the latest to come to the defense of former Washington Post blogger Elizabeth Flock, and I hereby unironically aggregate his critique of "an ethically flexible form of 'journalism' which involves reporting news from elsewhere."

Butterworth writes that, contrary to what Ben Goldacre said on Twitter, aggregation isn't like flipping burgers. McDonald's can quickly cook and sell burgers of consistent quality (he said, restraining himself) anywhere in the world because it's always cooking the same things.
Aggregated news stories, on the other hand, may all sound similar and share the same formal qualities (lots of links!), but each is the product of a different set of ingredients. In McAggregate, you are never going to flip the exact same burger twice. This means the probability that you’re going to unknowingly report something false or miss a crucial ingredient is much, much higher than McDonald's is likely to serve an undercooked burger. ... This is a game in which the participants are going to fail, sooner or later.
Erik Wemple, media blogger for The Washington Post, made a similar point when he talked to my colleague Craig Silverman: (more...)
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Upworthy seeks the serious side of shareable content

Upworthy | The Filter Bubble | All Things D
There's no shortage of aggregators on the Web trying to ride the cresting waves of viral content, but a new one launched Monday with a different spin. Upworthy promises to find content that is "highly sharable and clickable and actually important," co-founder Eli Pariser writes. It will be a test of whether important news stories and public issues can be as viral as cat videos. Upworthy's preference for visual content also makes it uniquely suited to thrive on Pinterest. All Things D's Liz Gannes notes that Upworthy is another project funded by Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, who just bought The New Republic.
Upworthy focuses on the sweet spot between awesome, meaningful and visual
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Editor of Daily Mail’s website defends attribution practices in face of growing criticism

This week’s issue of The New Yorker has a profile of the Daily Mail and the place it holds in Britain. The timing is perfect: last week the paper won 10 prizes at the U.K. Press Awards and the Mail … Read more

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Can we agree about aggregation standards?

Tuesday at South by Southwest, Simon Dumenco spoke on a panel called, "Is Aggregation Theft?" The panelists all agreed that there are proper ways to aggregate, but there are plenty of "thefty" examples.

At 3 p.m. EDT Dumenco will describe his goals for a group he's formed called the Council on Ethical Blogging and Aggregation, highlighted in David Carr's Media Equation column Monday. (The Huffington Post took issue with Carr's column, but not with the Council.) Among the things we'll discuss during the chat:
  • Can we agree on standards for ethical aggregation?
  • How can you tell the difference between something that adds value and something that rips off someone's idea?
  • Can we identify any aggregation best practices, such as length of posts, linking and credit?
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Can SEO-heavy aggregation eventually lead to in-depth journalism?
“Sometimes I think we want a one-size-fits-all, linear solution to the tumult in the news business when the the real ‘answer,’ such that it is, is that you have to walk before you can run, and that your transition for success SHOULD, and indeed must, have a lot of pivots in it, as most good entrepreneurial thinkers know.

“It reminds me of teaching beginning news reporting. … Somehow, learning to write the most basic, simple story launches you into a space in which you can then start doing some more interesting things as a reporter and a writer. Sometimes you have to learn a certain skill – how to be smart on the web – before you can start creatively melding that skill with some of your higher values of investigative journalism.”

Carrie Brown-Smith, assistant professor of journalism at the University of Memphis

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AP sues aggregator Meltwater News over copyright infringement

Associated Press | Meltwater
Six weeks after the AP and other investors launched a licensing organization to collect fees from aggregators, the AP has filed a lawsuit against Meltwater News, which bills itself as "more than a traditional media monitoring service." AP CEO Curley calls it a "parasitic distribution service" that is undercutting AP's business by providing its content to Meltwater clients without paying for it.

The AP says Meltwater is taking its customers — not the newspapers and broadcasters you normally think of as AP clients, and not the average guy scanning Google News at lunch, but those like the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. According to the lawsuit:
The U.S. government is one of AP's largest customers, and AP's subscriber roster includes nearly 100 government agencies — federal, state, local and foreign — including the U.S. Senate, the U.S. State Department, the New York City Police Department, and various foreign embassies. These government subscribers often do not publish the stories themselves, but monitor the news wire to stay apprised of timely, accurate news reports as they develop. ...

AP has lost, and continues to lose, customers to Meltwater over the past several years. For example, the Department of Homeland Security terminated its contract with AP, choosing instead to receive AP content through Meltwater.
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New iPad app aggregates only long-form journalism

The essential role of an aggregator is to make choices for readers, usually about which topics, sources or issues are worth paying attention to. A new aggregation and reading app launching Wednesday for the iPad holds a different standard — … Read more

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Rivera: Bad writers complain that Techmeme doesn’t link to their stories

This Week in Tech
A lot of people ask Gabe Rivera why Techmeme doesn't link to their stories, he tells Leo Laporte and Sarah Lane. "A lot of it is just bad writers who haven't come to terms with their being bad," he says. He used to ignore such complaints; now "I actually enjoy some of the complaining." Rivera recently explained what gets a story linked on Techmeme and what doesn't. How to get linked: Break a big story. How to be ignored: "Write enigmatic headlines."
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The aggregator’s dilemma: How do you fairly serve your readers & the sources you rely on?

When you aggregate content, what obligation do you have to the original source — and to readers?

I asked myself this question after seeing how people reacted to the events surrounding Jim Romenesko’s departure from Poynter, and decided to … Read more

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Morning advisory: Nov. 28, 2011

Here's what you may have missed Thanksgiving week:
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