Articles about "Amazon"


Jeff Bezos

Newspaper distributor to do same-day delivery for Amazon

mediawiremorningIt’s Thursday. Here’s a pop quiz: How many media stories do you think you’re about to get?

  1. UK newspaper distributor will do same-day Amazon deliveries: “Connect Group will make early morning deliveries at the same time as it delivers daily newspapers and use contractors to fulfill a second delivery in the afternoon.” Connect distributes The Guardian and The Mirror, Rory Gallivan reports. (Wall Street Journal)
  2. Longtime S.F. Chronicle editor William German dies at 95: “Mr. German began his career at the paper as a copy boy. When he retired 62 years later, he was the dean of West Coast editors. He had helped transform The Chronicle from the No.3 newspaper in a four-newspaper city to the largest paper in Northern California.” (San Francisco Chronicle)
  3. BBC battles Ebola in Africa with WhatsApp: “The service will deliver information on preventative care, health tips and breaking news bulletins specific to the region about the virus in French and English, and often in audio formats,” writes Alastair Reid. (Journalism.co.uk) | Related: 5 tips on covering Ebola from the Dallas Morning News and KERA News. (Poynter) | Related: 5 Ebola falsehoods, via PunditFact. (Poynter)
  4. Ken Doctor on Kushner’s OC Register: “Aaron Kushner, by age 40, may be setting a land-speed record for entry, meteoric rise, embarrassing fall and exit from the newspaper industry.” (Nieman Lab) | Related: A lawsuit filed by the Los Angeles Times alleges not only that Kushner has failed to pay more than $2 million owed to the Times for delivery services, but also that the Register kept tips intended for the LA Times newspaper carriers who delivered the Register. (OC Weekly) | Related: “I admired his daring approach, his insistence that investing in newspapers rather than constantly cutting them back and weakening them would give them a better chance to prevail in the digital age,” Rem Rieder writes. (USA Today)
  5. Another alt-weekly closes: The Knoxville News Sentinel, which owns the Metro Pulse, laid off all 23 staffers, including everyone at the alt-weekly. “Yes, it’s true. We don’t exist anymore. We no longer have jobs either. This week’s issue will be our last,” Metro Pulse wrote on its Facebook page. (Poynter)
  6. Indianapolis TV news crew carjacked: No one was hurt after the van was stolen by a gunman after a reporter and photographer for WXIN covered a prayer vigil. (Fox59)
  7. Ernie Pyle statue has a misspelling: The Indiana University alum who covered World War II is referred to as a “U.S. War Corespondent.” The sculptor says it could become “part of the lore of the piece.” (Indiana Daily Student)
  8. ICYMI: At the Washington Post, “what began as a simple experiment to improve the site’s author pages has evolved into the beginnings of a completely new content management platform,” explains Benjamin Mullin. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Kansas City Star celebrates the Royals’ trip to the World Series (courtesy the Newseum).kansascitystar
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ryan Kellett is now audience and engagement editor at The Washington Post. Previously, he was national digital editor there. (The Washington Post) | Dean Haddock is a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He is director of web and information technology for StoryCorps. Melody Joy Kramer is a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is an editor and digital strategist at NPR. Donna Pierce is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is a contributing editor at Upscale Magazine. Jack Riley is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He is head of audience development for The Huffington Post UK. Freek Staps is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He heads up business news start-up NRC Q. Amy Webb is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is the founder and CEO of Webbmedia Group. (Nieman Lab) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed UK is looking for a political reporter. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Men’s Health demonstrates how not to talk about sports with anyone

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. CNN will cut 300 jobs: About 130 people have taken buyouts, and 170 more will be laid off, Brian Stelter reports. Parent Turner Broadcasting plans to lay off 1,475 people. (CNN) | “Turner said it was adding 150 employees in growth areas.” (NYT)
  2. How not to talk about sports with anyone: Men’s Health tweeted an image of a woman holding a foam finger under the legend “How to Talk about Sports with Women.” The link led to a slight Teresa Sabga story called “The Secret to Talking Sports with Any Woman.” The mag apologized on Twitter: “It missed the mark and the negative feedback is justified. We’ve deleted it.” (@MensHealthMag) | A brief selection of reactions: “is this a joke?” (@AishaS) | “hi @MensHealthMag, you don’t know me, but i run @ESPNMag’s annual analytics issue. also, i have a vagina!” (@megreenwell) | “The article (article?) itself is 100 words of non-advice.” (The Daily Dot)
  3. College rescinds George Will’s speaking engagement: Scripps College uninvited Will from speaking at the all-women school. Will wrote a stupid column about sexual assault earlier this year. “They didn’t say that the column was the reason, but it was the reason,” Will told Brad Richardson. He was due to speak at the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Public Affairs Program, which aims to “bring speakers to campus whose political views differ from the majority of students.” (The Claremont Independent) | The St. Louis Post-Dispatch dumped Will’s column last June. “The column was offensive and inaccurate; we apologize for publishing it,” Tony Messenger wrote. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | An all-male cast of editors handled the column. (WP)
  4. L.A. Times says Aaron Kushner owes it millions: It stopped delivering the Orange County Register (and the now-shuttered Los Angeles Register) in L.A., telling Gustavo Arellano the Register “has, for more than a year and a half, been consistently late in paying money it owes The Times for services rendered.” (OC Weekly) | “The shame about the U.S. economy in the 2000s is that it’s been marked by a dearth of Aaron Kushners.” (Forbes)
  5. Scammers target Denver Post subscribers: “The notices offer one-year renewals to The Denver Post for the low, low price of only $489.95, which equates to 410 percent more than the actual current amount for The Post’s All Access Plus digital replica subscription and about 71 percent more than a new seven-day print subscription.” (The Denver Post) | Subscribers of several McClatchy papers, including The Sacramento Bee and the Charlotte Observer, have also been hit. (Sac Bee) | OOF: “Criminals should get -30- to life.” (@jfdulac)
  6. Amazon will help spread Washington Post content: A Kindle app, free for those who buy a certain model and paid for those who buy others, “will offer a curated selection of news and photographs from the daily newspaper in a magazine-style, tablet-friendly format.” (Bloomberg Businessweek) | “[I]f it increases the Post‘s reach (either for readers or advertisers, or both) and it doesn’t cost Amazon or Bezos too much, then it is a slam-dunk.” (Gigaom) | “Honest question: How many of you are listening to U2’s new album because Apple forced it into your iTunes library?” (@dylanbyers) | (Honest answer: I gave it many chances but still can’t recall most of the songs.) | Marginally related: Margaret Sullivan looked at whether NYT has covered Amazon v. Hachette fairly. (NYT) | FLASHBACK: Times reporter David Streitfeld on Amazon: “They don’t care if they’re liked, or even if they’re understood. That makes them challenging to write about.” (Poynter)
  7. Lessons from The New Yorker’s Web redesign: “Right on down to the font choice and page breaks, every decision we made, we first asked ourselves, ‘How will this affect whether or not people will read a story from beginning to the end?’” NewYorker.com Editor Nicholas Thompson tells John Brownlee. (Fast Company)
  8. A meh-moir: An oral history of the NYT’s Meh List. “[N]o one lived it like Mark Leibovich, who developed a sixth sense for meh.” By Samantha Henig, with additional reporting and user experience by Jon Kelly. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Asheville (North Carolina) Citizen-Times greets autumn, beautifully. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    asheville-10072014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Gillen is now executive editor of news enterprise at Bloomberg News. Previously, he was deputy business editor of enterprise at The New York Times. (Politico) | Loren Mayor is now chief operating officer for NPR. Previously, she was senior vice president of strategy there. (Poynter) | Mike Grunwald will be a senior staff writer at Politico magazine. He is a senior national correspondent for Time magazine. (Playbook) | Weston Phippen is now a reporter for the National Journal. Previously, he was a staff writer at the Tampa Bay Times. Lauren Fox will be a Congress reporter at the National Journal. Previously, she was a political reporter at U.S. News and World Report. (Email) | Mark Brackenbury has been named executive editor for the Connecticut Group at Digital First Media. He is managing editor for the New Haven Register. (New Haven Register) | Colleen Noonan has been named vice president of marketing and creative service for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was a digital media and marketing consultant at Pitney Bowes. Melanie Schnuriger is now vice president of product development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was general manager of fashion and beauty for Hearst Digital Media. Kristen Lee is director of digital development for the New York Daily News. Previously, she was digital integration editor there. Brad Gerick is now director of social media for the New York Daily News. He has been social media manager and regional editor for Patch.com. Zach Haberman is now deputy managing editor for digital at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was digital news editor there. Cristina Everett is now deputy managing editor for digital entertainment at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was senior digital entertainment editor there. Andy Clayton is now deputy managing editor for digital sports at the New York Daily News. Previously, he was senior online sports editor there. Christine Roberts is mobile and emerging products editor at the New York Daily News. Previously, she was an associate homepage editor there. (Email) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed is looking for a National LGBT Reporter. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org
    Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.
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Career Beat: Former NFL wide receiver Donte Stallworth joins HuffPost

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Michael Bloomberg will replace Daniel Doctoroff as chief executive officer of Bloomberg LP. Previously, Bloomberg was mayor of New York City. (New York Times)
  • Gina Sanders is now president of Condé Nast Global Development. She was president and CEO of Fairchild Fashion Media. (Condé Nast)
  • Brian Olsavsky will be chief financial officer for Amazon.com, Inc. He is the company’s vice president of finance. (Amazon)
  • Donte Stallworth is a politics fellow at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was a coaching intern with the Baltimore Ravens. Before that, he was an NFL wide receiver. (HuffPost Politics)
  • Chris Meighan is now design director of The Washington Post’s mobile initiative. Previously, he was The Post’s deputy design director. (The Washington Post)
  • Doris Truong will be weekend editor for The Washington Post’s universal desk. She is the homepage editor for The Post. (The Washington Post)
  • Joe Vardon will cover LeBron James for the Northeast Ohio Media Group. He was a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch. (Romenesko)
  • Tom Gara will be deputy editor for BuzzFeed Business. He is the corporate news editor for The Wall Street Journal. (Recode)
  • David Gehring will be vice president of partnerships for Guardian News & Media. He was the head of global alliances and strategic partnerships for Google. (Release)

Job of the day: The Dallas Morning News is looking for a photographer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Police Shooting Missouri

Where to buy gas masks for your reporting staff in Ferguson

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Who got arrested in Ferguson last night? Getty Images photographer Scott Olson. (Poynter) | Intercept reporter Ryan Devereaux (The Intercept) | Devereaux “was shot with rubber bullets/beanbags by police last night, spent night in jail. Is due to be released w/o charge soon.” (@the_intercept) | German reporters Ansgar Graw and Frank Hermann. (The Local) | “On Monday, The Washington Post, following the lead of other news organizations, began outfitting its employees with gas masks, purchased at a chain hardware store.” (WP) | Amazon has a pretty good selection of gas masks, some of which are eligible for Prime.
  2. St. Louis Post-Dispatch front page: “Streets Flare Up,” with stunning photo by David Carson (via Newseum) | Carson talked with Kristen Hare last week about covering the unrest in Ferguson. (Poynter) | Hare’s Twitter list of journalists covering Ferguson. (The list keeps changing! Let her know if someone’s missing/no longer there: khare@poynter.org.) | Interesting take: “I believe that publishing unedited images of Ferguson’s demonstrators engaged in possibly criminal behavior — including breaking curfew — is a breach of journalistic ethics.” (Al Jazeera America)
  3. R.I.P. Don Pardo: The NBC announcer and longtime voice of “Saturday Night Live” was 96. (LAT) | When Pardo joined NBC as a radio announcer in 1944, he “also played the role of engineer, getting the radio programs going and cuing up the right bits at the right time. If you could not do those chores, he said, you would not last as a radio announcer.” (NYT)
  4. Some NFL announcers won’t say Redskins’ name: Phil Simms (CBS) and Tony Dungy (NBC) say they won’t use it. “CBS is allowing its announcers to decide on their own whether to call the team the Redskins. So is Fox, which handles the NFC and will televise most of Washington’s games.” (AP) | My list of outlets and journalists who won’t use the term. (Poynter)
  5. Time Inc. rates employees based on how friendly their content is to advertisers: “Writers who may have high assessments for their writing ability, which is their job, were in fact terminated based on the fact the company believed their stories did not ‘produce content that is beneficial to advertiser relationships,’” Guild rep Anthony Napoli tells Hamilton Nolan. (Gawker) | “In a statement, Sports Illustrated said the guild’s interpretation was ‘misleading and takes one category out of context.’” (NYT)
  6. Newsweek builds up Web staff: Its print strategy in place, the magazine is staffing up on digital, Joe Pompeo reports: “The idea is to supplement magazine content, which is only available online to paying subscribers, while building up traffic that can service banner ads and sponsorships.” (Capital)
  7. Medill changes JR program: “The two new choices allow students to choose their own site, which Medill has to approve beforehand, or students can use an existing internship or fellowship to complete their JR requirement, even if it is done over the summer.” (The Daily Northwestern) | Last option is “biggest change,” a tipster tells Jim Romenesko: “Most seniors have completed 2+ internships excluding JR, so we’ve long griped about paying full tuition to add one more internship to our resumes.” (Romenesko) | Taylor Miller Thomas, who did a JR at Poynter, wrote about the strain of journalism internships last year. (Poynter)
  8. Your newsroom needs an audience development person: When Slate hired Katherine Goldstein, “we all had a lot to learn about traffic online, and she taught us about SEO, social,” Editor Julia Turner tells Lucia Moses. “What’s changed is, everyone in house is on board and understands that their primary job is to write great stories, but finding an audience is their job as well.” (Digiday)
  9. How depressing is the U.K. journalism market? “Frankly, moving abroad was the best thing we could have done, given the bloodbath of the UK media market, falling sales and job losses in recent times,” former Birmingham Mail journo Andy Probert tells Nick Hudson. Probert now works in Turkey. (HoldTheFrontPage.co.uk)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Keil will be a reporter for WOFL in Orlando. Previously, she was a reporter at WXIN in Indianapolis. Brooks Tomlin will be the station’s weekend, evening and morning meteorologist. Previously, he worked at the Commercial Weather Services of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology in Perth, Australia. (TV Spy) | Elizabeth Saab and Nick Spinetto will be reporters for KTBC in Austin, Texas. Saab was previously a multimedia journalist for Foxnews.com and Spinetto was a reporter at WMUR in Manchester, New Hampshire. (Austin360.com) | Evan White will be a reporter at WFSB. Previously, he was a reporter and fill-in anchor at WHAM in Rochester, New York. (The Laurel) | Anne McNamara is the host of The Now in Denver. Previously, she was an anchor at WAVY in Norfolk, Virginia. (TV Spy) | Job(s) of the day: The Daily Dot is hiring a morning and an evening editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Correction: This post originally spelled Phil Simms’ first name with an extra “l.” Read more

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The day in digital: ‘Amazon seems serious,’ GIFs on Twitter, CTOs look into their crystal balls

“Amazon seems serious about changing the way smartphones work,” Walt Mossberg writes at Re/code. Two big features of the new Amazon Fire Phone: hands-free navigation and “Firefly” software that identifies objects with the camera and links users to product pages on Amazon.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos holds up the new Amazon Fire Phone at the launch event Wednesda in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Facebook had a worldwide outage for about 30 minutes early this morning. No word yet on the cause, Mark Scott and David Jolly report at the New York Times Bits Blog, but everything seems to be OK now.

How far into the future are media company CTOs looking? Hearst is looking further than BuzzFeed, according to Justin Hendrix’s series of interviews at Medium, which Liam Andrew aggregated at Nieman Lab.

Twitter now supports in-line animated GIFs on the Web and in its iPhone and Android apps. According to Mashable’s Kurt Wagner, “it does not appear as though Twitter GIF support extends to Tweetdeck or tablets.”

Slate is a master of Facebook sharing, but that comes at a cost: vocal commenters decrying the site’s use of clickbait. American Journalism Review’s Cory Blair gathers some examples and asks Slate’s Jeremy Stahl if the complaints are legitimate.

PureWow, a women’s lifestyle site, gets 10 percent of its traffic from Pinterest, so it has created a “custom ad product to help monetize readers’ Pinterest activity,” Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton reports.

Over at PBS MediaShift, Susan Currie Sivek looks at how analytics are being used at Reader’s Digest and digital publishing platform Mag+. At Readers Digest, the numbers said to scale back interactivity on mobile phones and the Kindle Fire, but to keep it on the iPad.


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The Day in Digital: Inside the New York Times CMS and the impending Amazon phone

Content management systems are so in this season. Luke Vnenchak has a fascinating look inside Scoop, The New York Times’s “homegrown digital and (soon-to-be) print CMS.”

Jeff Bezos is expected to announce an Amazon smartphone today. How can the company compete with Apple, Android and Samsung? Quartz’s Dan Frommer has some thoughts on the strategy.

The Atlantic’s in good shape, for lots of reasons. Here’s another one, from a Jeff Sonderman tweet during American Press Institute’s summit on video:

Media critics weren’t critical enough of Aaron Kushner’s print-centric strategy at the Orange County Register, Clay Shirky writes, helping to poison the minds of young people who need to understand that print is in a death spiral from which it can’t recover.

“Do you really need another app for sharing photos and videos with your friends?” Ina Fried asks at Re/code as Facebook releases its new Snapchat competitor, Slingshot.

At PBS MediaShift, Dorian Benkoil explores efforts by Chartbeat, Upworthy, the Financial Times and more to measure “what advertisers and publishers really want — people actually paying attention.”

Yahoo revealed its worldwide workplace diversity. Employees are overwhelmingly white and Asian, and 62 percent male.


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David Streitfeld on Amazon: ‘They don’t care if they’re liked’

Around 1998, David Streitfeld gave Jeff Bezos a quick tour of The Washington Post. It really wasn’t a big deal.

“It was a newspaper,” Streitfeld told Poynter. “There wasn’t much to see.”

David Streitfeld looks through books in his basement. (Submitted photo.)

After he ushered Bezos around the newsroom, the two attended a lunch with editors of the Post.

“The editors there thought Amazon was cute, interesting, a frill — not something transformative,” Streitfeld said. “The notion that the Post would one day be owned by the guy with the goofy laugh sitting in front of them was literally inconceivable.”

Streitfeld, though, already knew that Amazon had that potential to be transformative, at least for the publishing industry. He covered the book beat for the Post at the time (in that role, he identified Joe Klein as the author of “Primary Colors”) and discovered Amazon early in his reporting. Then, Streitfeld, who is now a New York Times technology reporter as well as a book lover and collector, saw possibility in a company taking the selling of books into a digital space.

“I was so immersed in that world I saw larger consequences,” he said.

Sixteen years later, Streitfeld broke news about that once-cute company and its negotiation tactics on a major publisher, its authors and their books. Read more

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amazon_small_AP

Amazon complains about news coverage it won’t comment on

Amazon | The New York Times

Amazon has finally broken its silence about its dispute with Hachette: “we are not optimistic that this will be resolved soon,” a post by the Amazon Books Team, on Amazon, says.

The statement is remarkable in several ways,” David Streitfeld, who’s covered the dispute for The New York Times, writes, among them that the company suggests customers who want Hachette product not in stock “purchase a new or used version from one of our third-party sellers or from one of our competitors.”

Here’s one more rather remarkable part of the statement: Amazon says the dispute has “generated a variety of coverage, presumably in part because the negotiation is with a book publisher instead of a supplier of a different type of product. Some of the coverage has expressed a relatively narrow point of view.”

Text italicized by me to convey the disbelief anyone who’s followed this story may be experiencing. Here’s a quick history of Amazon’s efforts before this statement to mitigate that narrow point of view:

  • “An Amazon spokesman did not respond to a message about Ms. Heller’s complaints.” (May 9)
  • “Amazon seems confident the uproar will soon die down and it will get what it wants. It declined to comment.” (May 16)
  • “Amazon is, as usual, staying mum. ‘We talk when we have something to say,’ Jeffrey P. Bezos, the founder and chief executive, said at the company’s annual meeting this week.” (May 23)

The company points to “one post that offers a wider perspective,” on the blog The Cockeyed Pessimist. Discussion of Amazon’s post on Amazon, though, is closed. Read more

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos leads $5 million Business Insider investment

Business Insider | Bloomberg

Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget has revealed Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos is a principal contributor to a pool of $5 million in venture capital for the business-news website.

Blodget revealed the news to employees in a Friday memo: Read more

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Amazon to shake up mobile tech world with new Kindle devices, content deals

Bloomberg | The Verge | CNN Money
Amazon will make waves in the world of tablets, e-readers and possibly even smartphones today when it announces new devices at a 1:30 ET event. Here is what you can expect.

The Amazon devices

The star of today’s show is expected to be the Kindle Fire 2 — a refresh of the original Fire that debuted in November and lit up holiday sales. Amazon claims the Kindle Fire holds 22 percent of the U.S. tablet market, but sales have slipped recently and Amazon is looking for a fresh spark to consumer interest. Read more

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