Articles about "Apple"


Glenn Greenwald will live-blog the torture report

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. U.S. Senate will release torture report today

    Glenn Greenwald will live-blog. (The Intercept) | Former intelligence machers launch a website to respond to criticism. (Foreign Policy)

  2. Chris and Guy's press tour

    New Republic owner Chris Hughes and CEO Guy Vidra went on a press blitz Monday. Vidra told me remaining staffers at the in-turmoil publication were enthusiastic about its new direction after a Q&A on Friday. (Poynter) | He told Joe Nocera Vox was something like what he wanted to build under the New Republic brand. Nocera then gets browsing. "After we spoke, I went to the Vox website. I scrolled down until I saw a headline that stopped me cold. 'Everybody farts,' it read. 'But here are 9 surprising facts about flatulence you may not know.' Goodbye, New Republic." (NYT) | Another blast: I just read the word "farts" in The New York Times.

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Cue the outcry — more big Twitter changes on the way

Friday. Good morning (or good evening, if you’re reading this at night). Andrew Beaujon is back next week.

  1. Let’s freak out about Twitter changes: Sayeth Twitter: “in many cases, the best Tweets come from people you already know, or know of. But there are times when you might miss out on Tweets we think you’d enjoy.” Noooooooo! (Twitter) | Stuart Dredge weighs in: “The difference between the two social networks is that Facebook is taking stories out of its news feed – it prioritises around 300 a day out of a possible 1,500 for the average user – while Twitter is only adding tweets in. For now, at least.” (The Guardian) | Previously: I wrote about the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook. (Poynter)
  2. More Twitter changes: Now with audio! “Notably, Twitter is teaming up with Apple to let users listen to certain tracks and buy the music directly from the iTunes store,” Yoree Koh reports.
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Can iPhone widgets make news apps cool again?

The Financial Times notably embraces HTML5 web apps — and print! — over mobile apps. Quartz, perhaps the most widely praised new media site of the last year or so, is similarly app-less. Vox and FiveThirtyEight launched this year without native apps, and the Gawker network gets by without them just fine, too, thank you very much. The tech-savvy folks at The Verge just killed theirs.

A native app can be expensive to develop and maintain, and unless your push notification strategy manages to provide real utility rather than sporadic annoyances, the only way a reader ever enters it is by deliberately searching for the icon — perhaps buried on the third page of a home screen or inside the dreaded Newsstand on iPhones — with no idea what content awaits.

In other words, iPhone apps have never included a “shop window,” as Edward Roussel, head of products for Dow Jones, put it – a place for people to see beyond the logo. Read more

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How Apple prevents journalists ‘from asking really hard questions’

mediawiremorningGood morning. Jeez, my phone suddenly seems so dated and useless. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. What it’s like to cover an Apple event “The formula at these events is often the same: Apple invites select members of the press, who come and get their hands on the products and then write breathless stories filled with technical jargon and high-resolution photos. But this one was different. Gizmodo, for example, a publication previously banned for leaking photos of the iPhone 4 before its launch, was invited.” (BuzzFeed) |
    “You have to be able to control the journalist and prevent them from asking really hard questions,” a “source close to Apple’s international PR team” tells Patrick Coffee. (PRNewser, via Valleywag)
  2. One more battery to worry about: The new Apple watch is “a big deal.” (The Atlantic) | “this is by FAR the richest, deepest, most elaborate smartwatch OS ever” (@Pogue) | “Apple Gets Intimate.” (Medium) | “In other words, Apple hasn’t solved the basic smartwatch dilemma, which is that smart watches use up far more energy than dumb watches, and that there’s nowhere to store that much energy in something the size of a watch.” (Felix Salmon) | Design note: Apple made a new typeface for the watch.
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Apple’s iPhone Plus doesn’t spell doom for tablet design

Critics have long groused about the death of the tablet’s use in news design. Jon Lund pronounced tablet magazines “a failure” in a 2013 GigaOM article, declaring that the “app-based tablet approach to magazines leads straight to oblivion.”

When News Corp’s iPad newspaper, The Daily, was discontinued in 2012, Tech Crunch ran an article titled “Why magazine apps suck” that rattled off a list of problems plaguing tablet publications: large file sizes, lack of imagination from developers and a failure to reach the sizable audience of iPad readers.

In recent weeks, rumors of a new iPhone with a larger screen began circulating in advance of today’s Apple event, prompting industry watchers to forecast dark days ahead for the tablet. Marketwatch’s Quentin Fottrell called the new phone “a big risk for Apple,” quoting an analyst who said the larger screen might cannibalize the iPad market. The Motley Fool’s Tim Brugger agreed, writing that large-screen phones might eat into the sales of tablets and mini-tablets. Read more

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Forecast: Digital ad revenue to jump 17% this year, magazine ad revenue to fall 11%

mediawiremorningWednesday already? Here we go.

  1. Digital ad revenue to pass TV in 2017: According to Magna Global forecasts, “television revenues are expected to grow 2.2% this year,” Nathalie Tadena writes. “Newspaper and magazine ad revenue are expected to decline 8.9% and 11% respectively, while digital ad revenues are expected to jump 17% this year to $50 billion.” (The Wall Street Journal) | “The research firm declared digital ad revenue will hit $72 billion by 2017, pulling slightly ahead of television at $70.5 billion.” (The Wrap)
  2. The perils of freelance war reporting: GlobalPost went “above and beyond” in working for James Foley’s release before he was killed by Islamic State militants, according to Medill’s Ellen Shearer. “But other freelancers may not get that kind of backing or have access to the infrastructure that a staff journalist would, she said.” (AP via NYT) | Freelance journalist Austin Tice, who has been missing for two years, is believed to be held by the Syrian government, Lara Jakes reports.
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James Foley’s mother: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim’

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ISIS video appears to show James Foley’s execution: Masked executioner speaking “with what sounds like an East London accent…. says that Mr. Foley’s execution is in retaliation for the recent American airstrikes ordered by President Obama against the extremist group in Iraq.” (NYT) | Foley’s mother, Diane Foley, on Facebook: “We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people. We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world.” (Find James Foley) | “As of 7 a.m. local time on Wednesday, Foley’s family in New Hampshire had no confirmation from the US government of Jim’s death, and they acknowledged there is a small chance the video may still prove to be fake.” (GlobalPost) | Here are some links to stories published at the one-year anniversary of his disappearance, last November.
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New Yorker to introduce metered paywall; New York Times adds deputy-level digital editors

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, a world roundup):

— All articles published in The New Yorker since 2007 will be free online for three months as the magazine gets set to introduce a metered paywall. As it stands, the site’s mix of free and subscriber-only content has been “this kind of awkward, the best we could do, kind of paywall, where we held things back,” editor David Remnick tells Ravi Somaiya of The New York Times.

— The Times will add a deputy-level digital editor to each of its main news desks, according to a memo from executive editor Dean Baquet shared by Jeremy Barr at Capital New York. The role will include managing social media, audience development and long-term innovative projects.

— About 4 in 10 Americans homes have gone mobile-only, ditching their landline connections, according the National Center for Health Statistics. Read more

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The day in digital: Is ‘time on site’ metric a silver bullet? Plus iWatch news

Apple is planning to offer multiple versions of its long-rumored smartwatch when it is finally released in as early as October, Eva Dou and Lorraine Luk report in the Wall Street Journal. When it comes to watches, “one design doesn’t fill all,” an analyst said.

“The page view just won’t die,” BuzzFeed’s Myles Tanzer writes. But “time on site as an end-all, be-all metric doesn’t really work at the moment,” says Chris Thorman, who does audience development at Vox Media. (Poynter’s Rick Edmonds has argued it’s time to ditch the page view and unique visitor metrics.)

The NYT-WaPo-Mozilla plan to build a better commenting/community platform won’t vanquish trolls completely. “Try as we might, I don’t think we’re going to create magic,” said Greg Barber, the Post’s director of digital news projects. “What we’re going to do is try to take technology and apply it to the work we’re all doing as humans.”

Re/code’s Kara Swisher runs down all the job shuffling at Twitter, while pointing out the funny way she gets news about the company: She saw the job titles in Twitter bios had changes, and then confirmed the changes with Twitter. Read more

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Team podcasts disappear from iTunes after MLB complains about trademarks

NBC Sports | Awful Announcing

A number of baseball podcasts disappeared from iTunes after complaints from Major League Baseball about trademark infringement, Craig Calcaterra reports for NBC Sports. MLB says it notified Apple about “infringing uses of trademarks of Major League Baseball and certain Clubs” and “asked Apple to have these trademarks removed from the podcast titles and thumbnails.”

A bunch of podcasts vanished after that, Joe Lucia reports for Awful Announcing. Ted Price, who hosts a Texas Rangers podcast, tells Lucia iTunes accounts for almost all his downloads.

An MLB spokesperson told Calcaterra it didn’t ask for the podcasts to get 86′d: “Given our many years of experience in notifying Apple about trademark issues on the Store, we trust that removing the podcasts was an oversight, and ask that you please look into this matter as soon as possible.”

At least one professional sports team has zealously protected its trademarks when it comes to media coverage. Read more

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