Articles about "Associated Press"


Journalist whose own mother died in Afghanistan maintains connection with AP’s Kathy Gannon

The Washington Post
On Friday, freelance writer Tracee Herbaugh wrote about the death of her mother for The Washington Post. Sharon Herbaugh, an Associated Press bureau chief, died in a helicopter crash in Afghanistan in 1993. Herbaugh wrote about learning of the April 4 shooting of two AP staff in Afghanistan. Photographer Anja Niedringhaus died in that shooting, and reporter Kathy Gannon was injured.
Hearing of the attack on Kathy, who was seriously wounded and remains hospitalized in Germany, felt like my life had come full circle in a single moment. In 1993, my mother, Sharon Herbaugh, was the first woman bureau chief for the Associated Press to die while on assignment. In the days following the crash, the phone at my grandparents’ home in Colorado rang nonstop with calls from State Department officials, friends and journalists from all over the world. Kathy took charge of maintaining communication between my family and the AP. She also oversaw the return of Sharon’s body back home, to a farming town on the dusty plains of southeast Colorado.
Gannon has been hospitalized in Germany since the shooting.

"Kathy continues to undergo hospital treatment as part of her recovery," Paul Colford, director of AP Media Relations, told Poynter in an e-mail.

In her story, Herbaugh wrote about her own complicated relationship with her mother, becoming a journalist herself, and her continuing relationship with Gannon.
In the two decades that have followed Sharon’s death, Kathy has maintained a regular presence in my life. I exchanged e-mails with her only two days before she was attacked on the eve of Afghanistan’s elections. Much of what I know about my mother I’ve learned from Kathy. And she was often a source of support as my grandmother and I navigated the grieving process.
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Anja Niedringhaus_AP

AP honors photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus at funeral: ‘She found the quiet human moments’

The Associated Press

Photographer Anja Niedringhaus was remembered for "her ability to show compassion in the face of tragedy and her talent in offering direction to young photographers" at her funeral in Germany on Saturday. Niedringhaus was killed April 4 on assignment covering elections in Afghanistan. (more...)
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Newspapers in Myanmar print black front pages

A vender sits by local weekly news journals with their front pages printed black with letters saying "By opposing recent arrest and sentencing of journalists including a video journalist of DVB (Democratic Voice of Burma)" at a roadside shop Friday, April.11, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

BBC | Associated Press

Newspapers in Myanmar ran blacked-out front pages on Friday, the BBC and the Associated Press reported.
Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening. The black front pages — which included a protest message — in the influential Daily Eleven newspaper, its Sports journal and other papers follow a court decision Monday in which a video journalist for Democratic Voice of Burma was sentenced to one year imprisonment for trespassing and obstructing a civil servant while doing a story on education.
According to the BBC, several journalists have been arrested in recent months. (more...)
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AP will livestream Anja Niedringhaus’ funeral

In this Saturday, April 5, 2014 file photo, roses lay in front of a picture of the Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus, 48, who was killed April 4, 2014 in Afghanistan, in Paris. Fellow officers say the Afghan police commander who killed Niedringhaus and wounded reporter Kathy Gannon seemed a calm, pious man who may have come under the influence of Islamic fundamentalists calling for vengeance against foreigners over drone strikes. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
Associated Press
The Associated Press will livestream the funeral of photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus on Saturday. The service will take place near Hoexter, Germany, where she was born.
President and CEO Gary Pruitt, Senior Vice President and Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll and Vice President and Director of Photography Santiago Lyon are among those attending from the AP. Carroll and Lyon are scheduled to offer remarks. A livestream of the service will be available on AP.org starting at 5 a.m. ET / 0900 GMT. At the request of Niedringhaus' family, AP will cover and distribute both video and photos for pool, with no restriction. Satellite coordinates and contact information have been made available to AP customers in a media advisory.
Niedringhaus was shot and killed Friday, April 4, in the Khost Province of Afghanistan while covering election preparations. AP reporter Kathy Gannon was shot and the AP reports that she's being treated in Frankfurt, Germany.

Since Niedringhaus' death, her life and images have been remembered by journalists. (more...)
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Investigation launches into AP photographer’s death

Associated Press | San Jose Mercury News
The Afghanistan government has begun questioning the police commander who shot and killed AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus and wounded correspondent Kathy Gannon on Friday, AP reported.

The wire service said on Thursday:
Local security officials who spoke with the suspect after he was first detained said he seemed a calm, pious man who may have come under the influence of Islamic extremists calling for vengeance against foreigners over drone strikes. Witness and official accounts so far have suggested the shooting was not planned.
Gannon remains in stable condition at a Frankfurt, Germany, medical facility, said Paul Colford, AP director of media relations. "We are heartened by her progress," he said by email.

A funeral service for Niedringhaus is planned for Saturday at Corvey Abbey, a Benedictine monastery near where she was born in Hoxter, Germany.

On Wednesday, the San Jose Mercury News and other publications in the Bay Area News Group ran a frontpage tribute to Niedringhaus, an award-winning photographer whose work ranged from the violence of foreign wars to tranquil photos of a woman taking a dip in Lake Geneva.

In an editorial on Niedringhaus' career, the Mercury News wrote:
Her calling was to capture the humanity of the moment: joyous, tragic or that vast space of life in between. How much better might we appreciate our own culture had she turned her lens on us? But her work for the Associated Press was in Bosnia, Iraq, Afghanistan -- the places where the most violent history of our age has unfolded. Her work in Iraq won a Pulitzer Prize.

Now one fewer set of eyes is watching.
Related: Anja Niedringhaus: Covering war ‘is the essence of journalism’ | AP photographer killed in Afghanistan | War zone photographers a breed apart
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Yellow What the Barrier Tape

AP: ‘Damn’ and ‘hell’ OK, but not most other profanity

Associated Press | The Economist "I’m not sure everyone’s OK with news media keeping up with the latest vulgarities," AP standards editor Tom Kent writes in a post on the suddenly kind of hot topic of whether news organizations should publish profanity. "For instance, if our stories were as laced with things 'sucking' as common speech is, readers might find it very tedious very fast." AP now prints "damn" and "hell" without occasioning any pearl-clutching, Kent notes. And it will usually hyphenate or bleep newsworthy profanity, like when Vice President Biden called the health-care law "a big fucking deal" (a word Kent reproduces in all its glory). So why worry so much, AP?
We believe most AP subscribers — web and mobile news sites, broadcasters and newspapers — still want certain obscenities obscured. It’s also our own opinion that loading up our services with gratuitous obscenities cheapens our work and is of service to no one.
A "newspaper’s job is not to report tasteful news," The Economist's language blog, Johnson, writes in a call for The New York Times to loosen its standards.
True slurs, such as those concerning race, sex and disability, can sear the victim. Yet reporting on the damage done no more repeats the damage than publishing a photograph of a victim of physical harm repeats that harm. It’s called journalism, and it is the New York Times’s sole reason for existence.
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Al-Jazeera journalists mark 100 days in Egyptian jail amid calls for their release

Despite international calls for their release, three journalists who work for Al-Jazeera marked 100 days held in captivity by the Egyptian government joining a fourth who has been detained for nearly eight months.

The Qatar-based network held a press conference Monday in New York to call for support to win the release of Mohamed Fahmy, Peter Greste, Baher Mohamed who work for Al-Jazeera English, and Abdulla al-Shami, a correspondent for Al-Jazeera Arabic. Each was arrested and taken into custody amid the turmoil in Egypt which has resulted in the upheaval from a democratically elected government to the current regime.

Fahmy, Greste and Mohamed were detained Dec. 29 under charges of spreading false news and aiding a terrorist organization. Al-Shami was taken Aug. 14 and has been held without trial. Egypt accuses the journalists of supporting the deposed Muslim Brotherhood, which is deemed to be a terrorist group by the militarist government. The regime came into power after the ouster of former President Mohamed Morsi. (more...)
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PoynterVision: War zone photographers a breed apart

Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus’ death in Afghanistan serves as another reminder of the deadly calling that war photography can be. Recently, Afghanistan has become a dangerous assignment “on par with the height of the Iraq war or the current … Read more

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Afghanistan Photographer Killed

Afghanistan gets more dangerous for journalists as elections approach

Losing three colleagues in a month has been a shock, The Washington Post's Kevin Sieff told Poynter in an e-mail. "Reporting here has always come with risks, but there have never been so many brutal attacks on journalists in quick succession," wrote Sieff, the Post's Kabul bureau chief.

"The attacks have come at a time when on-the-ground reporting, the kind that Anja and Kathy were doing, is most essential. The country's elections and the U.S. military withdrawal have enormous implications for the future of Afghanistan, and those stories can't be covered solely from Washington or New York."

On Friday, Associated Press photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus was killed while reporting in Afghanistan. AP reporter Kathy Gannon was shot and is being treated nearby. Earlier this month, Afghan journalist Sardar Ahmad, a senior reporter for Agence France-Presse’s Kabul bureau, and British-Swedish journalist Nils Horner, who was based in Hong Kong, were also killed in Afghanistan.
Afghan men pass an election poster showing presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani Ahmadza in the center of Kandahar, Afghanistan, Monday, March 31, 2014. Eight Afghan presidential candidates are campaigning for the third presidential election. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Allauddin Khan)
In the 2014 press freedom index, Reporters Without Borders ranked Afghanistan 128 out of 180 countries.

Bob Dietz, Asia program coordinator for the Committee to Protect Journalists, chose not to visit Afghanistan on a recent trip to the region, he told Poynter in a phone interview.

"We looked at the situation, and we could see it disintegrating," he said. (more...)
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APTOPIX Afghanistan Election

Anja Niedringhaus: Covering war ‘is the essence of journalism’

AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed Friday in Afghanistan. In her 2012 book "At War," she wrote about her work, and Nieman Reports shared some of her words: "For me, covering conflict and war is the essence of journalism," Niedringhaus wrote.
My assignment, regardless of the era, is about people—civilians and soldiers. The legacy of any photographer is her or his ability to capture the moment, to record history. For me it is about showing the struggle and survival of the individual. Conflict is not all that I cover. I like the Olympics and the World Cup. In sports, there is a start and a finish. With war, the story never ends. It keeps me coming back.
Here are some of Niedringhaus' photos from Afghanistan from the last week.
An Afghan girl helps her brother down from a security barrier set up outside the Independent Election Commission (IEC) office in the eastern Afghan city of Khost, Thursday, April 3, 2014. Afghans go to the polls to elect a new President on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
A child pulls a rope which keeps Afghan women in line queuing to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man shouts in support for presidential candidate Ashraf Ghani Ahmadza as he arrives with others for an election campaign rally to the stadium in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan man waits to have his picture taken for his registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan soldier, left, and a policeman peek through a window as they queue with others to get their registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
An Afghan woman sits on destroyed school benches as she waits to get her registration card on the last day of voter registration for the upcoming presidential elections outside a school in Kabul, Afghanistan, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Elections will take place on April 5, 2014. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)
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