Articles about "Associated Press"


Lede of the day (it involves Rob Ford, deadmau5 and espresso)

Associated Press

Associated Press reporter Rob Gillies wrote a story about Toronto Mayor Rob Ford ordering five espressos, and its lede is phenomenal:

TORONTO (AP) – Famed DJ deadmau5 asked Rob Ford to go for a coffee run in his Ferrari and was jolted by the Toronto mayor’s order: five espressos in one cup.

But the last three lines of the story are remarkable as well.

Ford asks the teller twice if there’s five shots and later says he throws the “espressos back. I do.”

Ford admitted last year that he had smoked crack in a “drunken stupor.”

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
webat25-100

8 digital media lessons from Poynter’s ‘Journalism and the Web@25′ panel

Journalists shared personal stories about a “Goosebumps” fan site, a three-year-old riding an elevator, and dropping computer science classes in college to illustrate how journalism has changed since 1989 — and needs to change more quickly today — at Poynter’s “Journalism and the Web@25″ event Tuesday night.

The panelists at the Ford Foundation in New York represented both new and old media, and television, print, and mobile:

  • Rob King, ESPN‘s senior vice president, SportsCenter and News
  • Brian Stelter, host of CNN’s “Reliable Sources” and senior media correspondent for CNN Worldwide
  • Melissa Bell, co-founder, senior product manager and executive editor at Vox.com
  • Kathleen Carroll, executive editor and senior vice president of The Associated Press
  • Jeff Jarvis, founder of BuzzMachine.com and professor and director of the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism

Here’s a replay of the lively discussion (the event begins around the 8:50 mark) and some digital journalism lessons shared by panelists as they reflected on the past 25 years of the Web:

The time for urgency was then — and now

When it comes to digital transformation, “I think we probably all wish we had been faster, sooner,” said the AP’s Carroll.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

AP is reviewing its procedures after third revised tweet in a week

What’s going on with the AP Twitter account lately? After this masterpiece Wednesday:

The AP revised. … Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

NYT says its Gaza photos are real

BagNews

The New York Times says Atlantic senior editor David Frum is incorrect to claim that some photos taken in Gaza last week were faked or staged. “David Frum’s claims are false,” Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy told Poynter. Frum sent several tweets last week claiming the photos were faked.

“We have a complete account from the photographer, Sergey Ponomarev, who arrived with two other photographers to a local hospital as ambulances began arriving with dead and wounded civilians following an Israeli military strike on the outskirts of Khan Younis,” Murphy writes in an email.

Ponomarev “witnessed the man covered in blood in this photo arrive in an ambulance with a badly wounded elderly man (who ultimately died),” Murphy writes.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-07-25 at 9.17.58 AM

The history of TMZ, FT’s mobile revenue rises

Good morning. Almost there! Here are 10 or so stories.

  1. The problem with making a graphic about diversity in top newsroom positions over the years: “there isn’t really any racial diversity at all,” Manjula Martin writes. “Any way you click it, of the 183 top editors of mainstream English-language media outlets [Vijith] Assar counted here, one is a black man. Nine are white women (and two of them are Tina Brown).” (Scratch)
  2. Digital subscriptions up 33 percent at FT: Total circulation (677,000 across platforms) is up 13 percent over the first half of last year, FT parent Pearson reports in its half-year results. Mobile “now generates almost 50% of total traffic and 20% of new digital subscriptions,” and mobile ad revenue was up 9 percent.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments
C-3PO, R2-D2

AP’s robot-written stories have arrived

AP earnings-report stories written with automation technology have begun to appear. Earnings reports for Hasbro Inc., Honeywell International Inc. and GE, among others, bear the legend “This story was generated automatically by Automated Insights (http://automatedinsights.com/ap) using data from Zacks Investment Research.”

AP announced at the end of June that it would start using the technology to produce significantly more earnings report stories.

Reached by phone, AP Managing Editor Lou Ferrara said the stories began to appear around the middle of July, and all the ones you’re seeing right now have been checked by human eyes, as was the plan. “The tap isn’t fully open yet,” he said. Some stories were published just as Automated Insights filed them, others have had a few “bugs here and there,” Ferrara said.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

How Jim Brady plans to make money in local

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Was SI’s LeBron James scoop legit? Sam Kirkland rounds up some thinkination from thinkinators and notes that SND’s Rob Schneider said the NYT’s celebrated sports section front on Saturday was inaccurate — James hadn’t signed at the time. (Poynter) | The “item did move on the sports AP wire, exactly as presented,” Margaret Sullivan writes. “I guess I can see his point, but it’s too literal,” Benjamin Hoffman, who designed the page, told her. (NYT) | James decided to go to SI rather than ESPN because 2010′s “The Decision” “upset America’s collective stomach and spoiled his reputation as a basketball god,” Robert Weintraub writes. “The average fan could read his moving, sincere announcement on SI.com and subconsciously think, Maybe it was ESPN’s fault, not LeBron’s, all along.” (CJR) | The “trade rumor — shorthand here for any offseason transaction news — has become the dominant form of NBA journalism.” (Grantland)
  2. How Jim Brady plans to make money in local: His Philly news startup Brother.ly will use a “mix of advertising, events and memberships,” Joe Pompeo reports.
Read more
Tools:
1 Comment
Britain NSA Surveillance

Obama administration knew in advance about destruction of Guardian’s hard drives

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. Want more roundups? We got ‘em! From Sam Kirkland: “Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?” From Kristen Hare: “Chinese journalists get a warning; press freedoms halt in South Sudan.”

  1. Obama administration knew British government planned to force Guardian to destroy hard drives with Snowden docs: AP scores emails with a FOIA request. “‘Good news, at least on this front,’ the current NSA deputy director, Richard Ledgett, said at the end of a short, censored email to then-NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander and others. The subject of that July 19, 2013, email was: ‘Guardian data being destroyed.’” (AP) | FLASHBACK: Video of Guardian editors destroying hard drives while technicians from the Brtitish intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) watched.
Read more
Tools:
0 Comments

Retweets are endorsements at NPR and AP, but not at NYT

NPR is still worried that retweets can easily be misconstrued as endorsements, according to a memo from standards and practices supervising editor Mark Memmott obtained by Jim Romenesko.

According to Memmott, “despite what many say, retweets should be viewed AS endorsements.” He quoted from NPR’s ethics handbook:

“Tweet and retweet as if what you’re saying or passing along is information that you would put on the air or in a ‘traditional’ NPR.org news story. If it needs context, attribution, clarification or ‘knocking down,’ provide it.”

The reiterated policy of treating every retweet as a message that could be dangerously misconstrued comes in light of an education blogger lamenting on an official NPR account that “only the white guys get back to me” on deadline.… Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

AP on robot reporters: ‘I can’t have journalists spending a ton of time data processing’

AP’s plan to automate stories about earnings reports is designed to make life easier for human journalists, not to replace them, AP Managing Editor Lou Ferrara said.

Twitter jokes about our new robot journalist overlords notwithstanding, automation technology isn’t coming for the stories most reporters are writing; in fact, the majority of AP’s software-generated business stories will be stories that wouldn’t have existed otherwise. AP anticipates moving 4,400 stories per quarter with the new technology, up from 300 per quarter before.

Ferrara, a member of Poynter’s National Advisory Board, said “several dozen reporters” will be impacted by automation because covering most business beats — retail, energy, airlines, you name it — requires covering quarterly earning statements throughout the year. But the new technology doesn’t mean humans won’t still participate in the process.… Read more

Tools:
2 Comments