Associated Press

The AP uploaded a lot of history to YouTube

The Associated Press

The Associated Press announced Wednesday that it’s “bringing more than 1 million minutes of digitized film footage to YouTube” in partnership with British Movietone. The videos, from AP Archive channel and British Movietone’s channel, stretch back to 1895.

Showcasing the moments, people and events that have shaped the world, it will be the largest upload of historical news content on the video-sharing platform to date.

Some highlights include a 1936 assasination attempt on King Edward VIII:

Nelson Mandela’s release from prison:

And of course, an old cat video:

Correction: A previous version of this story said the AP announced the partnership on Tuesday. It was announced on Wednesday.


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In this May 16, 2015, photo, former slave fisherman Myint Naing, left, is embraced by his mother Khin Than, second left, as his sister Mawli Than, right, is overcome with emotion after they were reunited after 22 years in their village in Mon State, Myanmar. Myint, 40, is among hundreds of former slave fishermen who returned to Myanmar following an Associated Press investigation into the use of forced labor in Southeast Asia’s seafood industry. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

AP editor: ‘It’s not every day that we help get hundreds of slaves freed.’

In this May 16, 2015, photo, former slave fisherman Myint Naing, left, is embraced by his mother Khin Than, second left, as his sister Mawli Than, right, is overcome with emotion after they were reunited after 22 years in their village in Mon State, Myanmar. Myint, 40, is among hundreds of former slave fishermen who returned to Myanmar following an Associated Press investigation into the use of forced labor in Southeast Asia’s seafood industry. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

In this May 16, 2015, photo, former slave fisherman Myint Naing, left, is embraced by his mother Khin Than, second left, as his sister Mawli Than, right, is overcome with emotion after they were reunited after 22 years in their village in Mon State, Myanmar. Myint, 40, is among hundreds of former slave fishermen who returned to Myanmar following an Associated Press investigation into the use of forced labor in Southeast Asia’s seafood industry. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Last week, Associated Press reporter Margie Mason told the next chapter in a dramatic story the AP started telling in March. Mason wrote about a Burmese man who had once been enslaved on a fishing ship in Indonesia.

One day in April, a friend came to him with news: An AP report linking slavery in the seafood industry to some of the biggest American grocery stores and pet food companies had spurred the Indonesian government to start rescuing current and former slaves on the islands.

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15 political clichés journalists should avoid

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The New York Times | The Associated Press | The Washington Post

Politico’s Mike Allen, founder of the influential Beltway tipsheet “Playbook,” once wrote that those who write in clichés are probably thinking in clichés, too. As news organizations prepare to cover the 2016 election, here are some hackneyed words and phrases they should consider leaving off the campaign bus:

New York Times standards editor Philip Corbett weighed in Tuesday with a list of well-worn words that sneak into The Times’ coverage:
“I can project with confidence that we will see far too many uses of “optics,” “narrative,” “pivot,” “war chest” and “coffers” in the months between now and November 2016.”

A 2012 election style guide from The Associated Press offers a litany of stale verbiage. Read more

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Covering the Oscars can feel glamorous, but it’s still work

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Major news organizations to reveal new freelancer safety guidelines

Freelance journalist James Foley in 2011.  Photograph by Jonathan Pedneault

Freelance journalist James Foley in 2011. Photograph by Jonathan Pedneault

A coalition of prominent news outlets and journalism advocacy groups Thursday will release a set of guidelines at Columbia Journalism School for the protection of freelancers.

The recommendations, which will have the support of several prominent wire service organizations including The Associated Press and the Agence France-Presse, set forth best practices for both freelancers and the news organizations that employ them.

The new directives come amid a perilous time for freelance journalists, said Robert Mahoney, deputy director for the Committee to Protect Journalists. Widespread access to publishing tools has enabled terrorists to spread their messages widely without media organizations, making journalists more valuable to these groups as gruesome spectacles than bearers of witness. And financial setbacks have prompted many news organizations to shutter their foreign bureaus, leaving freelancers to pick up the slack in dangerous regions. Read more

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AP style tips for the Super Bowl: Avoid ‘Hail Mary’

The Lombardi Trophy at a news conference for NFL Super Bowl XLIX football game Friday, Jan. 30, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

The Lombardi Trophy at a news conference for NFL Super Bowl XLIX football game Friday, Jan. 30, 2015, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

If you’re covering the Super Bowl on Sunday instead of watching it (or just watching the commercials), you probably know the correct style to use for every player and play. In case you’re not a sports reporter and may end up writing about the game, the fans or the players anyway, here’s a quick look at some common football terms from the Associated Press Stylebook.

Some football positions:

Cornerback, defensive end, defensive tackle, fullback, halfback, left guard, linebacker, lineman, running back, quarterback, tailback, tight end and wide receiver.

In a 2012 Super Bowl style guide, the AP advises:

Spell out a player’s position on first reference.

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Eric Holder

The attorney general has released updated guidelines for investigating journalists

Reuters | Associated Press | Department of Justice

Changes in the Department of Justice’s guidelines for investigating journalists include approval in each case by the attorney general, Julia Edwards reported for Reuters. The changes were announced Wednesday.

The new guidelines dictate that the attorney general, not simply a member of the Justice Department staff, must authorize probes into all “newsgathering activities,” striking old language that applied only to “ordinary newsgathering activities,” a Justice Department official said.

News organizations objected to that language, Eric Tucker reported for the Associated Press.

The updated policy revises protocols announced last year amid outrage among news organizations over Obama administration tactics. It was released just as the Justice Department abandoned its yearslong efforts to compel a New York Times reporter to testify in the trial of a former CIA officer accused of disclosing classified information.

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AP Stylebook, parenting edition: ‘It’s baby-sit, baby-sitting, baby-sat and baby sitter.’

On Tuesday, the Associated Press’ monthly style chat focused on parenting with Leanne Italie. As you’ll see from the collection of tweets below, we quickly move through the stages of life, from baby sitter to teens to elder care in three tweets. Enjoy.

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New AP exhibit has images from every Super Bowl since 1967

Associated Press

The Associated Press has a free photo exhibit in Glendale, Arizona, open weekends through the Super Bowl. “Super Moments, Superstars, Super Game—An Associated Press Exhibit” features 50 images that go back to the first Super Bowl in 1967, according to the AP.

“AP photojournalists have been documenting the Super Bowl since it began,” said Santiago Lyon, AP vice president and director of photography. “We’re thrilled to offer some of their best work ahead of this year’s game.”

In this Feb. 7, 2010 file photo, New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (9) holds his son Baylen after the NFL Super Bowl XLIV football game against the Indianapolis Colts in Miami. The Saints won 31-17. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

In this Feb. 7, 2010 file photo, New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees (9) holds his son Baylen after the NFL Super Bowl XLIV football game against the Indianapolis Colts in Miami. The Saints won 31-17. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

More Super Bowl looks back: One time, Elvis Presto performed at the halftime show. Read more

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AP’s year of freaking out language geeks

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In March, the editors of the AP Stylebook changed a rule that may seem obscure to non-journalists: No longer would it enforce a distinction between “over” and “more than.”

The news of this change was Poynter’s most popular post of 2014, and reactions from journalists, many of whom had treasured the rule, were sometimes sad and often hilarious.

But AP’s reign of terror wasn’t more than yet (OK, I’ll stop now). Read more

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