Articles about "Associated Press"


BuzzFeed will look to Twitter users to help call elections tonight

BuzzFeed

The “decision desks” assembled by the Associated Press, TV networks and other mainstream news organizations have been “outcompeted in the marketplace of fast, accurate, sophisticated, and transparent information,” BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith writes.

So tonight as it covers returns, he says, BuzzFeed “will be looking first to the players in the vibrant, transparent twitter conversation to make our own calls and to power our election night graphic, and to make our own election night calls.”

AP and the nets will be among the participants in that conversation, but so will Nate Silver, Daily Kos and the Ace of Spades HQ Decision Desk, whose honcho, Brandon Finnigan, Smith profiled in September. (Finnigan will work from BuzzFeed’s L.A. office Tuesday night.)

In 2012 Brian Stelter wrote about how news organizations planned caution when making election-night calls — CNN and Fox’s goofs when reporting the Supreme Court’s Obamacare decision, NBC News’ star-crossed George Zimmerman 911 call still loomed large. Read more

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AP: Don’t use ‘horse race’ and other election cliches

Associated Press

The Associated Press published a mid-term election style guide on Friday, and it includes a list of election cliches with suggested alternatives.

For instance, instead of messaging, use “candidate’s pitch to voters.” Instead of horse race, use “a closely contested political contest.” And instead of war chest or coffers use “campaign bank account or stockpile of money.”

There are more cliches to avoid, plus style tips on common terms you may be using next week. Conservative and liberal, for instance, don’t get capped unless you’re talking about a formal name.

Here are a few things we’ve done on cliches at Poynter:

Why newspaper photo cliches make for great Tumblrs

And now for some really bad ledes

Avoid Cliches Like the Plague Read more

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Former AP editor sues over dismissal that followed retracted story

Style Weekly

Dena Potter has filed suit against the Associated Press, saying “she was unjustly fired for an error in a story edited by another staffer,” Ned Oliver reports for Style Weekly.

Potter was Bob Lewis’ editor in Richmond, Virginia, but says in the suit she did not work on the story that led to his dismissal, which claimed that then gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe lied during a federal investigation.

AP retracted the story. AP fired Potter, Lewis and another editor, Norm Gomlak.

Potter’s suit says Gomlak and Lewis worked on the story, and that she was “busy working with a reporter on another story, a shooting at a courthouse in West Virginia,” Oliver reports. She is seeking damages of $950,000 plus court costs, he writes.

Reached via email, AP spokesperson Paul Colford had no comment. Read more

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Connor Schell, Bill Simmons

ESPN ‘frees’ Bill Simmons, but will he seek more freedom elsewhere?

mediawiremorningIt’s Wednesday. That means you get 10 media stories.

  1. Freed Simmons: ESPN’s Bill Simmons returns to the network today after his three-week suspension “for calling N.F.L. Commissioner Roger Goodell a ‘liar’ during a podcast, and then effectively daring ESPN to punish him.” His contract expires next fall, Jonathan Mahler and Richard Sandomir report. Will he leave? (New York Times) | Deadspin would take him. (Deadspin) | Previously: At the time of the suspension, Kelly McBride wrote, “when your biggest star declares himself above his newsroom’s standards, the boss has to respond.” (Poynter)
  2. Oops — ABC News didn’t beat NBC after all: Two weeks ago, Nielsen reported that ABC’s “World News Tonight” topped “NBC Nightly News” for the first time in 260 weeks. But it turns out NBC actually kept its streak alive thanks to revised ratings after Nielsen discovered inaccuracies, Bill Carter reports. (New York Times)
  3. How Time is getting all that traffic: “Time, together with sister site Money, published at least five different pieces” on the day the cable channel FXX began its marathon of “The Simpsons.” Joseph Lichterman takes a deep look at how Time is engaging its audience — and how it has more than doubled its unique visitors in a year.
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AP’s Kathy Gannon: ‘I know neither Anja or I would have done anything differently’

In this Oct. 9, 2014 photo, Associated Press reporter Kathy Gannon answers questions during an interview in New York. This was Gannon's first interview since she and AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus were attacked on April 4, by a gunman in Khost Province in eastern Afghanistan as they prepared to cover the presidential election the next day. Niedringhaus was killed in the attack and Gannon is recovering from multiple gunshot wounds. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

In this Oct. 9, 2014 photo, Associated Press reporter Kathy Gannon answers questions during an interview in New York. This was Gannon’s first interview since she and AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus were attacked on April 4, by a gunman in Khost Province in eastern Afghanistan as they prepared to cover the presidential election the next day. Niedringhaus was killed in the attack and Gannon is recovering from multiple gunshot wounds. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

Associated Press

In her first interview since being wounded in Afghanistan in April, Associated Press correspondent Kathy Gannon spoke with David Crary about the shooting, the death of photographer Anja Niedringhaus and the choices they made before that. “Honestly, I’ve thought it through so many times — I know neither Anja or I would have done anything differently,” she said.

The two were shot at by an Afghan police officer.

Niedringhaus, 48, died instantly of her wounds. Gannon, 61, was hit with six bullets that ripped through her left arm, right hand and left shoulder, shattering her shoulder blade.

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AP to staff: Exercise caution over reports of suspected Ebola cases

Associated Press

The AP has issued guidance to its staff on how to report on and refer to two viruses in the news: Ebola and enterovirus.

Regarding Ebola, the AP explains:

Often the fact of an unconfirmed case isn’t worth a story at all. On several occasions already, in the U.S. and abroad, we have decided not to report suspected cases. We’ve just stayed in touch with authorities to monitor the situation.

Many news outlets today are reporting on a patient in Washington, D.C., who is “presenting symptoms that could be associated with Ebola.” But the AP notes:

In the United States, the CDC has — as of now — received about 100 inquiries from states about illnesses that initially were suspected to be Ebola, but after taking travel histories and doing some other work, were determined not to be. Of 15 people who actually underwent testing, only one — the Dallas patient — has tested positive.

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AP shifts style on Islamic State again

Associated Press

Here’s yet another style change related to the terrorist group that has been known as ISIS, ISIL and the Islamic State: the Associated Press now refers to it mostly as “the Islamic State group.”

Previously, the AP told Poynter its approach was “to refer to them on first reference simply as ‘Islamic militants,’ ‘jihadi fighters,’ ‘the leading Islamic militant group fighting in Iraq (Syria), etc.’”

Vivian Salama reports on the latest change:

The AP now uses phrases like “the Islamic State group,” or “fighters from the Islamic State group,” to avoid phrasing that sounds like they could be fighting for an internationally recognized state.

“The word ‘state’ implies a system of administration and governance,” said David L. Phillips, the director of Peace-Building and Rights Program at Columbia University. “It’s not a term that would be used to characterize a terrorist group or militia that is merely rolling up territory.”

On Monday, New York Times standards editor Philip Corbett wrote that the newspaper would begin referring to the group as the Islamic State, not ISIS, which stands for the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Read more

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Times of India publisher to staffers: Give us your social media passwords if you’re posting news

mediawiremorningHey, it’s Tuesday. Media stories coming your way!

  1. Strict, strange social-media policy at Times of India: Bennett, Coleman and Company Ltd staffers have been told not to post news stories from their personal social media accounts; instead, they must create company-authorized accounts, according to Quartz India. Even weirder: the company — which publishes The Times of India and The Economic Times — “will possess log-in credentials to such accounts and will be free to post any material to the account without journalists’ knowledge,” Sruthijith KK reports. (Quartz India) | Quartz-related: How often should a site launch a redesign, like Quartz just did? Mario Garcia: “The answer varies, and there is a basic principle I follow: redesign (and/or rethink) when you need it.” (Garcia Media)
  2. NYT’s controversial Michael Brown profile: New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan writes that calling Michael Brown “no angel” in a profile of the 18-year-old killed by police in Ferguson, Missouri, was “a blunder.” (Public Editor’s Journal) | Times national editor Alison Mitchell told Erik Wemple that the phrase derived from the story’s lead, which told an anecdote about Brown seeing a vision of an angel.
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AP will livestream Simone Camilli’s funeral

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Associated Press

The Associated Press will livestream the funeral for AP video journalist Simone Camilli, who became the first foreign journalist killed covering the Gaza conflict Wednesday:

The funeral service is scheduled to begin 6 p.m. (12 p.m. ET / 1600 GMT), in the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul. It will be celebrated by the bishop of Pitigliano-Sovana-Orbetello, the Rev. Guglielmo Borghetti.

AP President and CEO Gary Pruitt and other AP staff will attend.

Live coverage will also be available to all AP Direct clients from 1530 GMT, as well as AP Video Hub clients.

The funeral of Abu Afash, a Gaza resident, was held Wednesday in keeping with Muslim tradition.

Camilli and his Palestinian translator, Ali Shehda Abu Afash, died after unexploded ordnance detonated in a disposal site in the town of Beit Lahiya, according to the AP. Police engineers were trying to defuse the ordnance when it exploded, killing six people and seriously injuring three others. Read more

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Why AP style doesn’t use ISIL or ISIS anymore

Just two weeks after the Associated Press explained why it referred to the Islamic militant group laying siege to Iraq as “ISIL” rather than “ISIS,” the rebels complicated matters by declaring a new “Islamic caliphate” and changing their name to “the Islamic State.”

The English translation for the group’s former name previously used by the AP was the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL. News organizations like The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times, meanwhile, referred to it as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS.

Now the question for news organizations is whether to go along with the group’s rebranding efforts and potentially grant it undeserved legitimacy, or to keep using an acronym that’s familiar to readers but is arguably out-of-date. Read more

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