Articles about "Austin Tice"


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James Foley family’s new fund will ‘honor what he stood for’

mediawiremorningGood morning. We’re nearly there. Here are 10 media stories, plus a fact that made me sigh and quietly review my life choices: The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Ready to Die” came out 20 years ago Saturday.

  1. Foley, Tice parents speak: “I really feel that our country let Jim down,” James Foley‘s mother Diane Foley tells Anderson Cooper. She says her son “was sacrificed because of just a lack of coordination, lack of communication, lack of prioritization.” (CNN) | Earlier this week, Austin Tice‘s parents told Clarissa Ward, “If an American citizen is held hostage overseas, you are discouraged and disparaged if you even consider paying a reward for a precious human child, because you don’t know where that reward money’s gonna go. …You know, we’re just a mom and dad. We just want our child back, and we wanna do whatever it takes.” (CBS News) | A message from the Foley family Twitter account: “please follow our new Twitter account @JamesFoleyFund.” (@freejamesfoley) | The fund will “honor what he stood for,” the family writes, with plans to build “a resource center for families of American hostages and [foster] a global dialog on governmental policies in hostage crises,” among other goals. (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  2. Networks say they won’t show Rice video anymore: ESPN made that call Tuesday morning, David Bauder reports. “It was obviously quite disturbing and we felt the audience had seen it enough,” ESPN spox Josh Krulewitz said. (AP) | Meredith Clark: “Using the video without consent violates our ethical obligation to treat Janay Rice and other survivors of intimate partner violence as people rather than vehicles for social change.” (Poynter) | Related: How “did Goodell pick the Rice case to appear insufficiently authoritarian?” Jack Shafer asks. (Reuters)
  3. What a watch-based media landscape may look like: “The Apple Watch also makes a solid case for a more algorithmically curated, condensed Twitter timeline,” Dan Frommer writes. “One thing we noticed is the text in Twitter’s app that describes your Timeline: ‘New and interesting.’” (Quartz) | “We are about to enter the era of ‘glance journalism.’” (Nieman) | Yahoo News Digest already works on Apple Watch, and Circa is looking into it. (BuzzFeed) | Very related: Research from Irene Costera Meijer and Tim Groot Kormelink looks into news consumption, including “Checking and scanning vs snacking and monitoring.” (Online Journalism Blog)
  4. Speaking of Yahoo News Digest: Its new iPad app hit the App Store last night. (Yahoo’s Tumblr) | Nick D’Aloisio, who heads the Yahoo News Digest team, tells Leo Kelion he is “weighing up university and Yahoo” for next year. (He’s 18.) (BBC News)
  5. Attn: NYC tourism folks: Humans of New York blogger Brandon Stanton: “Out of all the countries that I’ve been to, Ukraine reminded me the most of home.” (Kyiv Post)
  6. You know how we keep talking about the revenue potential of video ads? Almost 20 percent of that market belongs to YouTube, but that may be as high as it gets. (WSJ)
  7. Intern apologizes: Mallory Musallam wrote a letter to former internship host David Letterman saying she’d withdrawn from a class action suit and had been “approached by a beguiling legion of lawsuit-hungry attorneys.” (NYDN)
  8. Vook has bought the ashes of Byliner: “The deal may be good news for Byliner authors who wondered how they were going to get paid,” Laura Hazard Owen reports. “Vook said Thursday that it would be paying them 85 percent royalties on works that were already for sale at digital retailers like Amazon and Apple.” (Gigaom)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: A moving photo on The New York Times. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Kate Lanphear is now editor-in-chief of Maxim. Previously, she was style editor at T Magazine. (WWD) | Kerry Diamond is now editor-in-chief of Yahoo Food. She is the co-founder and editorial director of Cherry Bombe. Kristen Baldwin is editor-in-chief of Yahoo TV. Previously, she was deputy editor at Entertainment Weekly. (Email) | Alice Gabriner will be international photo editor for Time magazine. She was a senior photo editor at National Geographic. Mandy Oaklander will be a staff writer for Time magazine. Previously, she was a senior writer for Prevention.com. Jack Linshi is a breaking news reporter and homepage editor at Time magazine. He was a weekend arts and living editor at the Yale Daily News. Lily Rothman will be an archive editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was a reporter there. Reno Ong will be an audience engagement editor at Time magazine. Previously she was a copy editor there. (Fishbowl DC) | Emma Fitzsimmons is a transit reporter for The New York Times. Previously, she was a reporter there. (NYT Metro desk) | Pamela Henson is now president and publisher of the Appleton (Wisconsin) Post-Crescent. She was senior vice president of advertising, marketing and digital sales at the Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Journal-Sentinel. (Gannett) | Tim Tebow is now a contributor at “Good Morning America.” He’s a college football analyst for ESPN. (ABC News) | Job of the day: Mashable is looking for a San Francisco-based social media reporter. Get your résumés in! (Mashable) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Forecast: Digital ad revenue to jump 17% this year, magazine ad revenue to fall 11%

mediawiremorningWednesday already? Here we go.

  1. Digital ad revenue to pass TV in 2017: According to Magna Global forecasts, “television revenues are expected to grow 2.2% this year,” Nathalie Tadena writes. “Newspaper and magazine ad revenue are expected to decline 8.9% and 11% respectively, while digital ad revenues are expected to jump 17% this year to $50 billion.” (The Wall Street Journal) | “The research firm declared digital ad revenue will hit $72 billion by 2017, pulling slightly ahead of television at $70.5 billion.” (The Wrap)
  2. The perils of freelance war reporting: GlobalPost went “above and beyond” in working for James Foley’s release before he was killed by Islamic State militants, according to Medill’s Ellen Shearer. “But other freelancers may not get that kind of backing or have access to the infrastructure that a staff journalist would, she said.” (AP via NYT) | Freelance journalist Austin Tice, who has been missing for two years, is believed to be held by the Syrian government, Lara Jakes reports. (AP) | Previously: Tice “disappeared on Aug. 14, 2012, while reporting on Syria for The Washington Post and McClatchy, among other outlets.” (Poynter) | Related: Peter Theo Curtis, who was freed in Syria by extremist group al-Nusra Front on Sunday, has returned home to Boston and reunited with his mother. (AP)
  3. Online “spiral of silence”: In a Pew study, researchers found that 86 percent of U.S. adults were willing to talk about surveillance issues in-person, while just 42 percent of Twitter and Facebook users were willing to post about them on those social networks. “Overall, the findings indicate that in the Snowden case, social media did not provide new forums for those who might otherwise remain silent to express their opinions and debate issues.” (Pew Research Center) | Another interpretation, from Chris Ip: “A hesitancy to share online could actually be a valuable restraint for someone who would otherwise have shot an unthinking opinion into the digital ether, safe in the knowledge their network of followers would agree with their views.” (Columbia Journalism Review)
  4. “You could teach a whole course on Ferguson”: “We’ve seen it in other cities,” Amber Hinsley, assistant professor at St. Louis University, tells Kristen Hare. “But for St. Louis, this is really our first big story that broke on Twitter. You saw it unfold on Twitter.” (Poynter)
  5. Did you know: The domain .TV is owned by Tuvalu, a South Pacific nation, and it’s becoming a big deal for branding as sites look to capitalize on appetite for online video, Noam Cohen reports. (The New York Times)
  6. New Quartz homepage aimed at loyal visitors: It’s modeled after the site’s newsletter, Zach Seward tells Joseph Lichterman: “It’s so new, and there aren’t enough analogous products out there to really tell if we should be expecting people to just be twitchy and checking it all the time, or if they have one time in their day when they check it and it’s just that once a day.” (Nieman Lab)
  7. Nationwide Time Warner Cable outage: The Internet was down between 4:30 a.m. and 6 a.m. during “routine network maintenance,” Brian Stelter reports. Many of the homes served by TWC are in Los Angeles and New York: “That made Wednesday’s outage more noticeable, because it affected journalists and the people who employ them.” Good point. (CNN)
  8. Bigger iPad on the way? iPhones are getting bigger this year, and soon there will be a 12.9-inch version of the iPad, too. Sales of the tablet have fallen for two straight quarters. (Bloomberg) | It sounds awkward and way too big for a tablet, but Steve Kovach writes it could be a “dream device” by basically being a less “clunky and confusing” Surface Pro 3. (Business Insider) | Related: Walt Mossberg still loves tablets. (Re/code)
  9. Newspaper front page of the day: The Virginian-Pilot, selected by Kristen Hare. (Newseum)
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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Mignon Fogarty is now the Donald W. Reynolds Chair in Media Entrepreneurship at the University of Nevada, Reno. She is the founder of the Quick and Dirty Tips network. (Poynter) | Tom Cibrowski is now senior vice president of news programs, newsgathering and special events at ABC News. He was a senior executive producer at “Good Morning America.” (ABC News) | Michael Corn will be senior executive producer at “Good Morning America.” Previously, he was executive producer of “World News.” Almin Karamehmedovic will be executive producer at “World News.” Previously, he was executive producer at “Nightline.” (ABC News) | Kylie Dixon is now co-anchor for “2une In” at WBRZ in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Previously, she was an anchor at KXII in Sherman, Texas. (businessreport.com) | Les Vann is now general manager of WISH in Indianapolis. Previously, he was general manager of WJCL in Savannah, Georgia. Steve Doerr will be acting general manager for WJCL. Previously, he was northeast region vice president for Smith Media. (Lin Media) | Job of the Day: The Associated Press is looking for a news editor in Nashville, Tennessee. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Swedish journalists missing in Syria are freed

GlobalPost | Associated Press

Wednesday morning, GlobalPost reported that two Swedish journalists who were missing in Syria have been freed. According to Agence France-Presse, the news was confirmed by a source with the International Committee of the Red Cross.

In November, Poynter wrote about Magnus Falkehed and Niclas Hammarström,  who may not have had the right papers and were abducted in November when trying to leave the country.

The GlobalPost story does not name the two journalists who have been freed, but the Associated Press reported Wednesday that Sweden’s Foreign Ministry confirmed the two freed journalists were Falkehed and Hammarström. Read more

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Photographer kidnapped in Syria is released

Associated Press

Bunyamin Aygun, a Turkish photographer who was kidnapped in Syria in November, has been released, the Associated Press reports.

The photographer for Turkey’s Milliyet newspaper — who recently won awards for his photographs of Syria’s civil war — was kidnapped in northern Syria in November by groups believed to be linked to al-Qaida.

Two American journalists who were working in Syria remain missing. Austin Tice, a freelance journalist who wrote for The Washington Post, McClatchy and other news outlets, went missing in August 2012. James Foley, a freelance journalist working for GlobalPost, who went missing in November 2012.

In December, Poynter wrote about a Reporters Without Borders report, which tallied journalist kidnappings in 2013 at 87, up 129% from the year before, with 49 alone in Syria. Read more

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Journalist Austin Tice has been missing for over a year. (AP Photo/Family of Austin Tice)

In 2013, 87 journalists were kidnapped around the world

The Daily Star | The Huffington Post | RWB | CPJ

Bunyamin Aygun, a Turkish photographer working in Syria, has been missing for two weeks, according to a report in The Daily Star, a Lebanese publication. Aygun’s newspaper, The Milliyet, said Tuesday they hadn’t heard from him at all in that time, but The Daily Star reports that “some media outlets said he had been kidnapped by Al-Qaeda affiliates in Syria.”

For 2013, 87 journalists have been kidnapped around the world, according to a report Wednesday from Reporters Without Borders. That number marks a 129% rise from the year before.

In November, RWB declared Syria “the world’s most dangerous country for journalists.” Read more

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Swedish journalists abducted in Syria may have lacked proper visas

The Local | Associated Press

Swedish journalists Magnus Falkehed and Niclas Hammarström “are experienced journalists and they know that they cannot move about in a regime-controlled area without a visa,” Kassem Hamadé, a reporter for the Swedish newspaper Expressen, tells The Local. Falkehed and Hammarström were abducted Saturday as they tried to leave Syria. Read more

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Journalist James Foley in 2011 (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

James Foley has been missing for a year

GlobalPost | Committee to Protect Journalists | Associated Press | The Daily Northwestern | The Atlantic

Friday marked one year since American freelance journalist James Foley went missing in Syria.

“In order to preserve the security of our investigation, we’ve been unable to share much detailed information with the public or even with the GlobalPost family,” writes Philip Balboni, GlobalPost’s CEO and president. “But please know that our search for Jim has not slowed and that there are important leads being actively pursued even at this moment.”

Foley in 2011 (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
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Austin Tice

Austin Tice has now been missing for a year

The Family of Austin Tice | McClatchy

The journalist Austin Tice has been missing in Syria since Aug. 14, 2012. Writing on the anniversary of his disappearance, his family says “None of us want to place special significance on this date because we know that every one of those days has been unimaginably challenging for Austin.” Read more

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Mideast Lebanon Syria Journalist

Austin Tice’s parents struggle to find answers about their missing son

Agence France-Presse

The parents of journalist Austin Tice are currently in Beirut, where they’re hoping to find information about their 31-year-old son. Tice, a McClatchy and Washington Post freelancer, has been missing for 11 months in Syria — a country that’s been ranked the most dangerous place in the world for journalists.

Marc and Debra Tice. (AP Photo from November 2012/Bilal Hussein)

In a July 4 interview with Agence France-Presse, Debra and Marc Tice explain how difficult it’s been waiting for answers and say they continue to hold onto hope.

“I just wake up and think, I woke up again and nothing has changed, it wasn’t a dream,” Debra told AFP. “I put my feet on the floor and I build a wall around my emotions and I just think about what strength I need for today.”

Marc added: “Honestly, we’re not that interested in who or why, we’re interested in how do we get him back, what is needed to return him to us safely.” Read more

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Senators urge State Department to ramp up efforts to find Tice, Foley

Associated Press

Senators in New Hampshire and Texas are urging the State Department to increase its efforts to find missing journalists James Foley and Austin Tice.

‘‘As the months continue with no further information regarding Mr. Tice’s or Mr. Foley’s whereabouts or welfare, we ask for your continued personal attention to these cases,” New Hampshire senators Jeanne Shaheen and Kelly Ayotte and Texas senators John Cornyn and Ted Cruz wrote in a letter Thursday.

They also asked Secretary of State John Kerry to raise awareness about U.S. citizens being held in Syria and to address it during peace talks in Geneva, the Associated Press reports.

Foley, a freelance journalist for Agence France-Presse and GlobalPost who’s from New Hampshire, has been missing in Syria since November. Tice, a McClatchy and Washington Post freelancer from Texas, has been missing in Syria since last August. Tice’s family recently returned to Beirut to, as they put it, “reach more deeply into the region on behalf of our son.” Read more

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