Articles about "Baltimore Sun"


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Here are 40 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org. Read more

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Connor Schell, Bill Simmons

ESPN ‘frees’ Bill Simmons, but will he seek more freedom elsewhere?

mediawiremorningIt’s Wednesday. That means you get 10 media stories.

  1. Freed Simmons: ESPN’s Bill Simmons returns to the network today after his three-week suspension “for calling N.F.L. Commissioner Roger Goodell a ‘liar’ during a podcast, and then effectively daring ESPN to punish him.” His contract expires next fall, Jonathan Mahler and Richard Sandomir report. Will he leave? (New York Times) | Deadspin would take him. (Deadspin) | Previously: At the time of the suspension, Kelly McBride wrote, “when your biggest star declares himself above his newsroom’s standards, the boss has to respond.” (Poynter)
  2. Oops — ABC News didn’t beat NBC after all: Two weeks ago, Nielsen reported that ABC’s “World News Tonight” topped “NBC Nightly News” for the first time in 260 weeks. But it turns out NBC actually kept its streak alive thanks to revised ratings after Nielsen discovered inaccuracies, Bill Carter reports. (New York Times)
  3. How Time is getting all that traffic: “Time, together with sister site Money, published at least five different pieces” on the day the cable channel FXX began its marathon of “The Simpsons.” Joseph Lichterman takes a deep look at how Time is engaging its audience — and how it has more than doubled its unique visitors in a year.
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Tribune expands music business with Gracenote purchase

Tribune Co. | The New York Times

Tribune Co. is purchasing the music metadata firm Gracenote in an $170 million agreement with Sony Corp. of America, the company announced Monday:

Gracenote is the largest source of music data in the world, featuring metadata for more than 180 million tracks, which helps power more than a billion smart phones and tablets, as well as the world’s most popular streaming music services.

The purchase comes as Tribune continues its transition away from publishing and ends the year having cut $90 million in print division compensation costs as of the third quarter. Read more

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Petitioners ask FCC to block Gannett-Belo deal

Free Press | Variety

Gannett and Belo are trying to get around FCC cross-ownership rules by transferring broadcast licenses to shell companies, Free Press and other groups say in a petition asking the FCC to block the companies’ planned merger.

Gannett announced in June it would buy Belo, making it the fourth-largest owner of major network affiliate stations. The company already owns many newspapers. Investors have cheered the deal.

Time Warner Cable, the American Cable Association and DirecTV have also filed a petition opposing part of the deal, Ted Johnson reports. Those entities say “the deal threatens to drive up retransmission fees and risk even more station blackouts in negotiation standoffs,” Johnson writes.

“These arrangements attempt to mask the true intent and effect of the transaction: to allow Gannett to simultaneously influence and control multiple media outlets in the same local market in a way that is contrary to the public interest and otherwise prohibited by the Commission’s rules,” Free Press’ petition (embedded below) says. Read more

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Front page appears courtesy of the Newseum.

Baltimore Sun printing in New Orleans for Super Bowl weekend

The Baltimore Sun is publishing a special edition to be distributed to New Orleans-area hotels this weekend. Sun spokesperson Renee Mutchnik told Poynter the edition will comprise the front and sports pages of the daily (Sunday’s will include a special game day section). The paper is printing 3,000 copies of the paper Friday, Saturday and Sunday in Houma, La.

Plus: “When we win, not if, we will also have some on Monday,” Mutchnik said. That edition will have 1,000 extra copies; Mutchnik said the Tribune-owned paper will be available to hotel guests even if they are not Ravens fans. Read more

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Baltimore Sun celebrates anniversary with 1837-style website

The Baltimore Sun

The Baltimore Sun turns 175 on Thursday; to celebrate, Director of Interactive Design Adam Marton has reconfigured its website to present today’s news as it might have looked in the 19th century (one big difference: You’d be using Internet Explore to view it) and to show the news from May 17, 1837, Web-style: Read more

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The Baltimore Sun recounts some of its most famous errors

John McIntyre, longtime copy editor and current night content production manager for the Baltimore Sun, dove into the paper’s archives for a story that shares some of the Sun’s notable mishaps and corrections.

It is, of course, delightful.

Here are two of my favorite items from the piece, which you should go read now:

When the Republican Party nominated Abraham Lincoln for the presidency in 1860, The Sun headline identified him as “Abram Lincoln.”

And:

An Evening Sun food page article on home canning and preserving produced a legendary headline, “You Can Put Pickles Up Yourself.” There’s no writing a correction for that.

When my archives are back online after being transferred to Poynter.org, I promise to do a post of my favorite Sun corrections since 2004. Read more

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Baltimore Sun columnist confesses to recycling passages from old columns

A recent column from longtime Baltimore Sun columnist Jacques Kelly includes a surprising admission in the third paragraph:

… it’s time for a confession. In many of my columns, I repeated sentences and entire passages from past columns that I considered my old standbys. My motivation was to give my readers what I thought they wanted. But it was disingenuous to include parts of previous columns word for word without telling the reader they had been published before, which is against Baltimore Sun policy.

Kelly’s column doesn’t explain why he confessed now, or if he faced any disciplinary action for his recycling. The column bears the innocuous headline, “Longtime columnist embarks on new writing path.” I personally think “Longtime columnist self-plagiarizes, gets to keep writing” is catchier, and more accurate.

I emailed Kelly early yesterday morning to ask him to elaborate on the column and explain how his violation of Sun policy came to light. Read more

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Foundation could ‘re-open the question’ of buying Baltimore Sun

The Baltimore Sun
Robert Embry Jr., who was reportedly part of an investors group thinking about buying the Sun in 2006, tells Gus Sentementes that the investors “would re-open the question” once the Tribune Co. exits bankruptcy. Embry also says people have approached his Abell Foundation with proposals to fund journalism startups, but none have appeared to be self-sustaining. || Related: Judge approves Lee Enterprises plan to exit bankruptcy (The Wall Street Journal) Read more

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How CNBC corrected its incorrect correction about Bain & Company

Last Thursday, CNBC Washington correspondent Eamon Javers published a report stating Bain & Company (of Mitt Romney fame) was consulted by Obama administration officials working on the auto bailout.

Javers’ source was a reference to “Bain Consulting” made in a report from the inspector general of the TARP program. He also contacted the PR department at Bain for confirmation, but didn’t hear back before publishing his story. (The report has since been taken offline.)

Not long after the story was published, Bain’s public relations team contacted CNBC to demand a retraction. Here’s how Javers describes the company’s reaction to his story:

In an email to CNBC late Thursday night, Bain & Company Global Public Relations Manager Dan Pinkney demanded an “immediate retraction” of the story. Pinkney said it was “factually incorrect” to say that Bain & Company had advised the Obama Administration on the auto bailout. He added that he believed CNBC had confused his firm with another consulting firm, Boston Consulting Group.

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