Articles about "BBC"


‘It’s been a tough month for factchecking.’

Good morning. Here are eight media stories.

  1. Who wants to be a teenage millionaire?

    New York high school senior Mohammed Islam didn't make $72 million on the stock market. He lied. If it's any consolation, his parents are really mad. "My mom basically said she’d never talk to me." One more line from that story, which is possibly the lead that captures 2014: "It’s been a tough month for factchecking." (New York Observer) | Here's New York's original story, with another non-correction correction. (New York) | New York Post also ran it. (New York Post) | RELATED: Craig Silverman's best and worst corrections of the year piece will be out soon. Here's last year's. (Poynter) | Journalists remember their first fact checking jobs. (Poynter)

  2. Journalists arrested in Turkey

    In Turkey on Sunday, police raided newsrooms and detained journalists, including Ekrem Dumanlı, editor-in-chief of Zaman, a daily newspaper.

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Career Beat: Ad Age gets new editorial director

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Eli Lake is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a national security correspondent. Josh Rogin is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a senior correspondent. (Huffington Post)
  • Simon Dumenco is editorial director at Advertising Age. Previously, he was a columnist there. (Ad Age)
  • Fran Unsworth is now director of the World Service Group at the BBC. She’s deputy director of news and current affairs. (The Guardian)
  • Chris Moody will be a senior correspondent for CNN Politics Digital. Previously, he was a political correspondent for Yahoo News. (Politico)
  • Jeffrey Schneider is founding his own PR firm, Schneider Global Strategy. He’s a senior vice president and spokesperson at ABC News. (ABC)
  • Sruthijith KK is now editor at Huffington Post India. Previously, he was editor of Quartz India. (Medianama)

Job of the day: U.S. Read more

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Cue the outcry — more big Twitter changes on the way

Friday. Good morning (or good evening, if you’re reading this at night). Andrew Beaujon is back next week.

  1. Let’s freak out about Twitter changes: Sayeth Twitter: “in many cases, the best Tweets come from people you already know, or know of. But there are times when you might miss out on Tweets we think you’d enjoy.” Noooooooo! (Twitter) | Stuart Dredge weighs in: “The difference between the two social networks is that Facebook is taking stories out of its news feed – it prioritises around 300 a day out of a possible 1,500 for the average user – while Twitter is only adding tweets in. For now, at least.” (The Guardian) | Previously: I wrote about the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook. (Poynter)
  2. More Twitter changes: Now with audio! “Notably, Twitter is teaming up with Apple to let users listen to certain tracks and buy the music directly from the iTunes store,” Yoree Koh reports.
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Jeff Bezos

Newspaper distributor to do same-day delivery for Amazon

mediawiremorningIt’s Thursday. Here’s a pop quiz: How many media stories do you think you’re about to get?

  1. UK newspaper distributor will do same-day Amazon deliveries: “Connect Group will make early morning deliveries at the same time as it delivers daily newspapers and use contractors to fulfill a second delivery in the afternoon.” Connect distributes The Guardian and The Mirror, Rory Gallivan reports. (Wall Street Journal)
  2. Longtime S.F. Chronicle editor William German dies at 95: “Mr. German began his career at the paper as a copy boy. When he retired 62 years later, he was the dean of West Coast editors. He had helped transform The Chronicle from the No.3 newspaper in a four-newspaper city to the largest paper in Northern California.” (San Francisco Chronicle)
  3. BBC battles Ebola in Africa with WhatsApp: “The service will deliver information on preventative care, health tips and breaking news bulletins specific to the region about the virus in French and English, and often in audio formats,” writes Alastair Reid.
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BBC website blocked throughout China

BBC

The BBC’s website has been subjected to “deliberate censorship” across China in the wake of its coverage of Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution, the network reports.

Weeks ago, the BBC reported that Instagram appeared to be blocked in China, and phrases like “Occupy Central” and “Hong Kong students” were hidden on Twitter searches.

The BBC notes that it has been the subject of “intermittent blackouts” in China while reporting on the country.

Also on Wednesday, Reuters reported that a Chinese official in Hong Kong told foreign journalists to report on the ongoing Umbrella Revolutions demonstrations “objectively”.

Related: Kristen Hare’s Twitter list of journalists covering the Umbrella Revolution

The BBC’s website was most recently blocked in April 2012, during the network’s coverage of activist Chen Guangcheng’s escape, according to the BBC.

China has given other news organizations the same treatment in the past. Late last year, the government blocked websites for both The Wall Street Journal and Reuters; they were unblocked in early 2014. Read more

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Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog.
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BBC must get more women on air, oversight group says

The Guardian | BBC

In an annual report, the BBC Trust wrote about the need for “improvements in the representation of women on air.” The report came out Monday. John Plunkett wrote about the report for The Guardian.

The BBC has been told to tackle a continued “gender imbalance” among its presenters and talent following sustained criticism that it is failing to put enough women on air.

The BBC Trust called on management to come up with a co-ordinated plan to tackle the shortcomings, despite various initiatives announced by director general Tony Hall since he took on the job last year.

According to the report from BBC Trust, “we want the BBC to make measurable progress in reflecting better the diversity of the UK population in the BBC’s workforce and its output, in particular increasing the number of women on air.”

Gender imbalance is also a problem for newspapers in the U.K. Read more

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Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch is not giving up, the BBC cuts hundreds of jobs

mediawiremorningGood morning. Let’s do this. Read more

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Armed Thai soldiers and local officials inspect the Patong beach during a clean up operation Wednesday, July 9, 2014, in Phuket, southern Thailand. Thailand's new military junta sent soldiers to one of the country's best known beaches Wednesday to evict food hawkers, massage huts and other illegal vendors as part of a campaign to clean-up the country's image and enforce laws that have long been ignored. (AP Photo/Krissada Mueanhawong)

BBC plans to expand past Facebook in Thailand

Armed Thai soldiers

Armed Thai soldiers and local officials inspect the Patong beach during a cleanup operation in Phuket, southern Thailand. (AP Photo/Krissada Mueanhawong)

On Thursday, the BBC launched a Thai news feed through Facebook to help get news in and out of a country with a military that has tightly controlled information since it took over in a coup in May.

And they’re planning to expand to other social media platforms, Charlotte Morgan, head of International Communications for BBC News, told Poynter in an e-mail. Facebook will be the BBC’s content management system using the Notes feature, she said, and the BBC is focusing on publishing short stories with four to five paragraphs.

“The content will be around international news, international reactions to the situation in Thailand, news from Thailand – through the BBC and also content from agencies, Thai media, stringers and social newsgathering,” Morgan said.

That news will be multimedia, Morgan said, with audio and video when possible. Read more

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BBC uses Facebook to get around Thai military censors

BBC | The Telegraph

The BBC launched a Facebook news stream in Thailand on Thursday. The initiative “follows the military coup in May after which international channels, including BBC World News TV, were taken off air temporarily,” the Beeb reports.

The news org says it plans to run the “pop-up” service for three months. Stories will be in Thai and English.

The news stream “is targeting Thailand’s 24 million Facebook users, among a population of 67 million Thais,” Damien McElroy writes for The Telegraph. “There are over 13 million in Bangkok alone, a figure that has quadrupled in just 12 months.”

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

In June, Poynter wrote about police in Thailand posing as journalists. In May, Poynter wrote about news outlets getting shut down after the military took over. Read more

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