Articles about "BBC"


Career Beat: Ad Age gets new editorial director

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Eli Lake is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a national security correspondent. Josh Rogin is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a senior correspondent. (Huffington Post)
  • Simon Dumenco is editorial director at Advertising Age. Previously, he was a columnist there. (Ad Age)
  • Fran Unsworth is now director of the World Service Group at the BBC. She’s deputy director of news and current affairs. (The Guardian)
  • Chris Moody will be a senior correspondent for CNN Politics Digital. Previously, he was a political correspondent for Yahoo News. (Politico)
  • Jeffrey Schneider is founding his own PR firm, Schneider Global Strategy. He’s a senior vice president and spokesperson at ABC News. (ABC)
  • Sruthijith KK is now editor at Huffington Post India. Previously, he was editor of Quartz India. (Medianama)

Job of the day: U.S. News and World Report is looking for a Congress reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Cue the outcry — more big Twitter changes on the way

Friday. Good morning (or good evening, if you’re reading this at night). Andrew Beaujon is back next week.

  1. Let’s freak out about Twitter changes: Sayeth Twitter: “in many cases, the best Tweets come from people you already know, or know of. But there are times when you might miss out on Tweets we think you’d enjoy.” Noooooooo! (Twitter) | Stuart Dredge weighs in: “The difference between the two social networks is that Facebook is taking stories out of its news feed – it prioritises around 300 a day out of a possible 1,500 for the average user – while Twitter is only adding tweets in. For now, at least.” (The Guardian) | Previously: I wrote about the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook. (Poynter)
  2. More Twitter changes: Now with audio! “Notably, Twitter is teaming up with Apple to let users listen to certain tracks and buy the music directly from the iTunes store,” Yoree Koh reports. Twitter is also partnering with Soundcloud. (Wall Street Journal) | “Throughout your listening experience, you can dock the Audio Card and keep listening as you continue to browse inside the Twitter app,” product manager Richard Slatter writes in a blog post. (Twitter)
  3. The media kinda sucks at covering Ebola: Just look at how it covered #ClipboardMan, Arielle Duhaime-Ross writes. (The Verge)
  4. Liberian media really sucks at covering Ebola: The Daily Observer newspaper “has become a feeding ground of phony conspiracy,” Terrence McCoy reports. “The top three news stories on the website all allege medical professionals purposely infected the country with Ebola, ideas that have drawn the conspiratorial from across the planet.” The bad journalism is leading to a debate over press freedom in the country. (Washington Post) | From yesterday: The BBC is using WhatsApp to spread accurate information about the virus in Africa. (Journalism.co.uk)
  5. Correction of the week: Deadspin retracted its story claiming U.S. Rep. Cory Gardner didn’t actually play high school football, as he claimed, after the primary source changed his mind. “As serial collectors of media fuck-ups, we add this self-portrait to the gallery,” editor Tommy Craggs writes. (Deadspin) | Earlier, Craggs told Erik Wemple, “If you’re looking for someone to blame here, blame me for getting way too cocky about my site’s ability to prove a negative.” (Washington Post)
  6. Whisper vs. The Guardian: A damning report in The Guardian on Thursday claimed Whisper, “the social media app that promises users anonymity and claims to be ‘the safest place on the internet’, is tracking the location of its users, including some who have specifically asked not to be followed.” (The Guardian) | Whisper editor-in-chief Neetzan Zimmerman angrily denied the report, and wrote on Twitter that the piece “is lousy with falsehoods, and we will be debunking them all.” (Washington Post) | Here’s a good explainer from Carmel DeAmicis: “The two sides disagree over what constitutes ‘personally identifiable information,’ whether rough location data tied to a user’s previous activity could expose someone.” (Gigaom) | And here’s a take from Mathew Ingram, who says Whisper’s problem is that it “wants to be both an anonymous app and a news entity at the same time.” (Gigaom)
  7. American journalists detained in Russia: Joe Bergantino, co-founder of the New England Center for Investigative Reporting, and Randy Covington, a professor at the University of South Carolina, are in Russia to teach an investigative journalism workshop. They were found guilty of “violating the visa regime” and will return to the U.S. on Saturday as scheduled. “Russian authorities have used visa issues in the past as a pretext to bar the entry for certain individuals to the country,” Nataliya Vasilyeva reports. (AP via ABC News)
  8. Good times at High Times: Subscriptions and advertising pages are growing for “the magazine about all things marijuana” as it celebrates its 40th birthday. Dan Skye, High Times’ editorial director, tells Michael Sebastian, “I think the legalization has everything to do with the boom.” (Ad Age)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Daily News (see it at the Newseum).NY_DN
  10. No job moves today: Benjamin Mullin has the day off. But be sure to visit Poynter’s jobs site. Happy weekend!

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Jeff Bezos

Newspaper distributor to do same-day delivery for Amazon

mediawiremorningIt’s Thursday. Here’s a pop quiz: How many media stories do you think you’re about to get?

  1. UK newspaper distributor will do same-day Amazon deliveries: “Connect Group will make early morning deliveries at the same time as it delivers daily newspapers and use contractors to fulfill a second delivery in the afternoon.” Connect distributes The Guardian and The Mirror, Rory Gallivan reports. (Wall Street Journal)
  2. Longtime S.F. Chronicle editor William German dies at 95: “Mr. German began his career at the paper as a copy boy. When he retired 62 years later, he was the dean of West Coast editors. He had helped transform The Chronicle from the No.3 newspaper in a four-newspaper city to the largest paper in Northern California.” (San Francisco Chronicle)
  3. BBC battles Ebola in Africa with WhatsApp: “The service will deliver information on preventative care, health tips and breaking news bulletins specific to the region about the virus in French and English, and often in audio formats,” writes Alastair Reid. (Journalism.co.uk) | Related: 5 tips on covering Ebola from the Dallas Morning News and KERA News. (Poynter) | Related: 5 Ebola falsehoods, via PunditFact. (Poynter)
  4. Ken Doctor on Kushner’s OC Register: “Aaron Kushner, by age 40, may be setting a land-speed record for entry, meteoric rise, embarrassing fall and exit from the newspaper industry.” (Nieman Lab) | Related: A lawsuit filed by the Los Angeles Times alleges not only that Kushner has failed to pay more than $2 million owed to the Times for delivery services, but also that the Register kept tips intended for the LA Times newspaper carriers who delivered the Register. (OC Weekly) | Related: “I admired his daring approach, his insistence that investing in newspapers rather than constantly cutting them back and weakening them would give them a better chance to prevail in the digital age,” Rem Rieder writes. (USA Today)
  5. Another alt-weekly closes: The Knoxville News Sentinel, which owns the Metro Pulse, laid off all 23 staffers, including everyone at the alt-weekly. “Yes, it’s true. We don’t exist anymore. We no longer have jobs either. This week’s issue will be our last,” Metro Pulse wrote on its Facebook page. (Poynter)
  6. Indianapolis TV news crew carjacked: No one was hurt after the van was stolen by a gunman after a reporter and photographer for WXIN covered a prayer vigil. (Fox59)
  7. Ernie Pyle statue has a misspelling: The Indiana University alum who covered World War II is referred to as a “U.S. War Corespondent.” The sculptor says it could become “part of the lore of the piece.” (Indiana Daily Student)
  8. ICYMI: At the Washington Post, “what began as a simple experiment to improve the site’s author pages has evolved into the beginnings of a completely new content management platform,” explains Benjamin Mullin. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The Kansas City Star celebrates the Royals’ trip to the World Series (courtesy the Newseum).kansascitystar
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ryan Kellett is now audience and engagement editor at The Washington Post. Previously, he was national digital editor there. (The Washington Post) | Dean Haddock is a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He is director of web and information technology for StoryCorps. Melody Joy Kramer is a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is an editor and digital strategist at NPR. Donna Pierce is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is a contributing editor at Upscale Magazine. Jack Riley is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He is head of audience development for The Huffington Post UK. Freek Staps is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. He heads up business news start-up NRC Q. Amy Webb is now a visiting fellow at the Nieman Foundation. She is the founder and CEO of Webbmedia Group. (Nieman Lab) | Job of the day: BuzzFeed UK is looking for a political reporter. Get your résumés in! (BuzzFeed) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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BBC website blocked throughout China

BBC

The BBC’s website has been subjected to “deliberate censorship” across China in the wake of its coverage of Hong Kong’s Umbrella Revolution, the network reports.

Weeks ago, the BBC reported that Instagram appeared to be blocked in China, and phrases like “Occupy Central” and “Hong Kong students” were hidden on Twitter searches.

The BBC notes that it has been the subject of “intermittent blackouts” in China while reporting on the country.

Also on Wednesday, Reuters reported that a Chinese official in Hong Kong told foreign journalists to report on the ongoing Umbrella Revolutions demonstrations “objectively”.

Related: Kristen Hare’s Twitter list of journalists covering the Umbrella Revolution

The BBC’s website was most recently blocked in April 2012, during the network’s coverage of activist Chen Guangcheng’s escape, according to the BBC.

China has given other news organizations the same treatment in the past. Late last year, the government blocked websites for both The Wall Street Journal and Reuters; they were unblocked in early 2014. Read more

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Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog. (New York Post) | Bentley “is being held in isolation and watched closely, but it is unlikely that he will have to be euthanized, Dallas city officials said.” (Mashable)
     


     

  3. Christie and Clinton overkill? Since Jan. 1, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was been the most-mentioned potential Republican presidential contender, according to a LexisNexis search of 15 top newspapers, with Mitt Romney, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul not far behind. Hillary Clinton, of course, is the most-referenced Democrat — and it’s not close at all. “Overall, more stories have talked about potential GOP candidates (202) than Democratic ones (115).” (Pew Research Center)
  4. Kushner no longer OC Register’s publisher: New publisher and CEO Richard Mirman takes over for the beleaguered Aaron Kushner, who remains CEO of Freedom Communications, which owns the newspaper. Mirman is an investor in the Register. (Orange County Register) | Previously: The Los Angeles Register closed last month after just five months of operation (Poynter), and the Register reportedly owes the Los Angeles Times $3.5 million in distribution fees. (OC Weekly)
  5. Rift between Guardian and NYT? When The Guardian’s hard drives were being smashed by British authorities in 2013, the newspaper arranged for The New York Times to share and protect some of its Snowden documents. But now, Lloyd Grove reports, some Times editors are frustrated with The Guardian’s “total control over the Snowden cache, including how and when it can be used to develop, pursue and publish investigations.” Counters Times executive editor Dean Baquet: “I don’t feel held captive by The Guardian, because I wouldn’t have access to these particular documents without The Guardian.” (The Daily Beast)
  6. White House’s Secret Service spin: “White House reporters are often too swamped to fully check out every assertion made by the White House’s press operation, and in this case officials seized on a phrase that is in the report. The report is rather complicated and someone reading quickly might not catch the nuance that this was not actually a finding, but merely a claim made by, among others, by the very person whose credibility is questioned throughout the report.” (Washington Post)
  7. BBC looks at “hybrid” broadcast-Internet radio on phones: “Nearly two thirds of the mobile phone owners surveyed found the idea of hybrid radio appealing and said it could be a deciding factor when faced with a choice between phones with similar specs.” (BBC)
  8. Not front page of the day: A story on A1 of some editions of The New York Times today is missing a byline and lede.
     


     

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Times-Journal of Fort Payne, Alabama, with a very not-lifesize picture of Ebola (Courtesy the Newseum).
     
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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Betsy Woodruff will be a politics writer for Slate. She’s currently a politics writer at the Washington Examiner. ‏(@woodruffbets) | Carlos Lozada will be a nonfiction book critic at The Washington Post. Previously, he edited Outlook there. (Washington Post) | Josef Federman is now Jerusalem bureau chief for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a news editor at the AP. (AP) | Chris Carter is now digital services sales director for The Alliance for Audited Media. Previously, he was director of business development for DG Interactive. (AAM) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for a photo editor. Get your résumés in! (AP) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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BBC must get more women on air, oversight group says

The Guardian | BBC

In an annual report, the BBC Trust wrote about the need for “improvements in the representation of women on air.” The report came out Monday. John Plunkett wrote about the report for The Guardian.

The BBC has been told to tackle a continued “gender imbalance” among its presenters and talent following sustained criticism that it is failing to put enough women on air.

The BBC Trust called on management to come up with a co-ordinated plan to tackle the shortcomings, despite various initiatives announced by director general Tony Hall since he took on the job last year.

According to the report from BBC Trust, “we want the BBC to make measurable progress in reflecting better the diversity of the UK population in the BBC’s workforce and its output, in particular increasing the number of women on air.”

Gender imbalance is also a problem for newspapers in the U.K. Last November, Suzanne Franks wrote about women’s bylines for Nieman Journalism Lab.

This is an issue in the U.S., too, in many forms. In February, Sara Morrison wrote for Poynter about the Women’s Media Center annual Status of Women in the U.S. Media report.

The report compiles recent studies from several sources — Media Matters, the American Society of News Editors, even Gawker — all of which show that despite efforts (or at least talk of efforts) to achieve parity in media organizations, from CEOs to copy editors, we haven’t come close.

And in their annual examination of literary outlets, VIDA found that many publications still have more male bylines.

In June of this year, Poynter hosted a national forum to discuss women in leadership. Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon covered the event.

National Geographic Editor-in-Chief Susan Goldberg said that when she edited the Plain Dealer and hired two women for top spots, a man at a community forum asked, “Are y’all running a henhouse over there?” Referring to advice Sheryl Sandberg gave in “Lean In,” Goldberg said, “Many of us have spent 30 years leaning in so far we fell on our face.”

There have some big changes, though, over a longer period of time. In May, I wrote about some early guidelines on how to manage women, (“What ego is to a man, security is to a woman, make her feel safe and needed and she’ll make you feel 10 feet tall,”) and what journalists who started their careers in that environment remember.

During her senior year in college, 1971 and 1972, (Jill) Geisler was approached by the general manager at the TV station where she worked part-time about being part of the noon-hour show, “The Farm Hour.” She mapped out plans to expand coverage of both news and cultural events for the show and presented it to him.

“He said, ‘I think I’ve made a mistake. You don’t want this job. You want to be one of the boys,’” Geisler remembers. “And I said, ‘No, sir, I want to be one of the reporters.’”

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Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch is not giving up, the BBC cuts hundreds of jobs

mediawiremorningGood morning. Let’s do this. Read more

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Armed Thai soldiers and local officials inspect the Patong beach during a clean up operation Wednesday, July 9, 2014, in Phuket, southern Thailand. Thailand's new military junta sent soldiers to one of the country's best known beaches Wednesday to evict food hawkers, massage huts and other illegal vendors as part of a campaign to clean-up the country's image and enforce laws that have long been ignored. (AP Photo/Krissada Mueanhawong)

BBC plans to expand past Facebook in Thailand

Armed Thai soldiers

Armed Thai soldiers and local officials inspect the Patong beach during a cleanup operation in Phuket, southern Thailand. (AP Photo/Krissada Mueanhawong)

On Thursday, the BBC launched a Thai news feed through Facebook to help get news in and out of a country with a military that has tightly controlled information since it took over in a coup in May.

And they’re planning to expand to other social media platforms, Charlotte Morgan, head of International Communications for BBC News, told Poynter in an e-mail. Facebook will be the BBC’s content management system using the Notes feature, she said, and the BBC is focusing on publishing short stories with four to five paragraphs.

“The content will be around international news, international reactions to the situation in Thailand, news from Thailand – through the BBC and also content from agencies, Thai media, stringers and social newsgathering,” Morgan said.

That news will be multimedia, Morgan said, with audio and video when possible.

“It’s similar to the approach we’ve taken with BBC Turkish which is now a ‘social first’ service, but Thai is the first to be launched exclusively on social media,” she said, adding that the BBC is increasing social media for all the languages it produces news for.

When asked if the network fears Facebook getting blocked in Thailand, Morgan said: “We know that social media is a key source of news in Thailand at the moment and we call on all countries to provide free and open access to media.”

On Wednesday, Damien McElroy reported for The Telegraph about the new service and the popularity of Facebook in Thailand, noting that in a population with 67 million, 24 million are Facebook users. BBC Thai had more than 26,000 likes by 3 p.m. Eastern.

Earlier on Thursday, Poynter wrote about the new feed and the coup that led to many media outlets getting shut out of Thailand.

On Wednesday, Reporters Without Borders wrote that Thai military are monitoring Facebook and “a political message there can put a journalist behind bars.” Thanapol Eawsakul, a magazine editor, was arrested and jailed for four days after posting comments on Facebook.

Upon his release, authorities had demanded that the journalist promise in writing to abstain from political activities that could generate social unrest. Precisely what Eawsakul wrote in the Facebook post that led to his subsequent arrest is not known. But the authorities are engaging in a widespread crackdown on social media, especially Facebook.

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BBC uses Facebook to get around Thai military censors

BBC | The Telegraph

The BBC launched a Facebook news stream in Thailand on Thursday. The initiative “follows the military coup in May after which international channels, including BBC World News TV, were taken off air temporarily,” the Beeb reports.

The news org says it plans to run the “pop-up” service for three months. Stories will be in Thai and English.

The news stream “is targeting Thailand’s 24 million Facebook users, among a population of 67 million Thais,” Damien McElroy writes for The Telegraph. “There are over 13 million in Bangkok alone, a figure that has quadrupled in just 12 months.”

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In June, Poynter wrote about police in Thailand posing as journalists. In May, Poynter wrote about news outlets getting shut down after the military took over. Also in May, Poynter wrote about the military taking BBC, CNN and other networks off the air. Read more

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Google removes Guardian, BBC search results; Facebook drives 25% of Hearst’s traffic

— Google has notified The Guardian and BBC that certain articles will no longer appear in European searches, Mark Scott writes at The New York Times Bits blog. A European court ruling allows people “to ask for links to information about themselves to be removed from search results.”

— As news organizations fail to take advantage of the surge in mobile ad spending, Poynter’s Rick Edmonds says his hunch “is that getting video right and getting stronger mobile ad performance will go hand in hand for news sites.”

— Facebook drives 25 percent of traffic to Hearst magazines, up from 4 percent last year. Lucia Moses explains the publisher’s new focus on Facebook at Digiday.

— Vice Media will move to a larger Brooklyn headquarters, Laura Kusisto reports in The Wall Street Journal. The company’s $6.5 million in state tax credits will be tied to the creation of 525 new jobs in the next five years.

— Slate’s Will Oremus takes Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg to task for a “non-apology apology” that’s “as incoherent as it is disingenuous.” Sandberg said the company’s emotion-manipulation study was “poorly communicated.”


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