Articles about "BBC"


Newspapers in Myanmar print black front pages

A vender sits by local weekly news journals with their front pages printed black with letters saying "By opposing recent arrest and sentencing of journalists including a video journalist of DVB (Democratic Voice of Burma)" at a roadside shop Friday, April.11, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

BBC | Associated Press

Newspapers in Myanmar ran blacked-out front pages on Friday, the BBC and the Associated Press reported.
Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country's media climate is worsening. The black front pages — which included a protest message — in the influential Daily Eleven newspaper, its Sports journal and other papers follow a court decision Monday in which a video journalist for Democratic Voice of Burma was sentenced to one year imprisonment for trespassing and obstructing a civil servant while doing a story on education.
According to the BBC, several journalists have been arrested in recent months. (more...)
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Happy april fools' day stamp

Hoax earthquake letter rings in April Fools’ Day

Los Angeles Times | The Guardian | BBC No, California, the U.S. Geological Survey is not warning people that a large quake is on its way. It's early yet in the U.S., but by now, April Fools' jokes are pretty much all played out in the UK. The Guardian collected the best jokes of the day, including their own, reporting that Scotland might switch to driving on the right, (which I did see on my Twitter feed this morning and remember thinking, hmmm, wonder how that's gonna work.)
"It sends out an explicit signal: we are part of Europe," said one of the brains behind the scheme. "The little Englanders who want out of Europe are the only ones driving on the left-hand side. We've been the smaller relative dominated and having to copy their ridiculous ways for too long. No more. Just think, this will be an indignity for little England – isolated in Europe and pootling along in the slow lane on the left," he added. They are concerned, however, that opponents of the move to the right might mobilise under the emotive slogan: "Proud to be left." Some fear that when the plans go public, the charismatic MP George Galloway would not be prepared to stand on the sidelines but would launch his own appeal: "Stay left, hard left."
The BBC took the day to remember their best April Fools' prank ever -- the annual spaghetti harvest. (more...)
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Why TV journalists ‘test the system’ with stunt reporting: It sometimes works

New York Post | BBC | The New York Times
On Tuesday, two CNN producers tried to sneak into the World Trade Center site. Several times. They were arrested, Larry Celona, Kevin Fasick and Bruce Golding reported for the New York Post.
Connor Boals, 26, and Yon Pomrenze, 35, made multiple attempts to get onto Ground Zero before being arrested shortly after 2 p.m., law enforcement sources said. The pair initially tried to get through a gate at Vesey and Washington streets, with a source saying they told the cop who stopped them that “if a 16-year-old could get on the site, they should be able to get in.”
Yon Pomrenze, left, and Connor Fieldman Boals, are shown after their arrests on Tuesday, March 25. Both men were been charged with criminal trespass, obstruction of governmental administration and disorderly conduct after trying to forcibly push their way through a controlled gate at the World Trade Center Construction site in New York City. A spokeswoman for CNN said the men were in the area to do a story about the recent security breaches and were not asked to sneak onto the site. (AP Photo/Port Authority of New York and New Jersey)
They weren't, and both have been charged with trespassing, Celona, Fasick and Golding reported, as well as disorderly conduct and obstructing governmental administration. (more...)
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You can use Getty Images for free, sort of

The Wall Street Journal | The Verge | BBC | Nieman Lab The "sort of" is you're using Twitter, Tumblr or "non-commercial WordPress blogs," Georgia Wells reported in The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday after Getty Images announced they'd make a whole lot of images available for free.
On Wednesday, the company unveiled the embed tool, which will allow users to include images on websites, such as non-commercial WordPress blogs. The eligible images also come with buttons for Tumblr and Twitter, where a link to the image can be shared. (The image itself doesn’t appear on Twitter, however.)
Poynter is a nonprofit, and we do use WordPress. But we do sell ads against our content. So I think it's OK that I pulled this shot this morning, because, well, look at that guy. (more...)
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In a lecture at the British Library Monday, BBC Director of News and Current Affairs James Harding said journalists upset by the changes to their industry are “missing the point.” Not only is Harding “extremely optimistic about the future of journalism,” he said, “I think this is the most exciting time to be a journalist since the advent of television.”

Professional journalists cannot expect to have the influence we once did, but, if we’re clever, if we’re innovative and if we’re trustworthy, we can earn it. This is because we live at a time when there is an unprecedented hunger for information and ideas, because the proliferation of new news providers means the number of working journalists is, actually, rising, because the tools available for story telling and story getting are more powerful than ever and because, as I hope to make clear, the new technologies have unexpectedly revealed the enduring value of some old principles in journalism.

The tools of technology also make it an exceptionally exciting time to be going after a story. Of course, a journalist is a fool to rely solely on Google or Wikipedia for information. But they are just as stupid to ignore them: the modern search engine has given us all a running start at any story. Citizen journalism is not just a competitor to established news media, but a streaming source of information and ideas for it. And the internet has turned our audience into a giant fact-checking machine: journalists are more directly and immediately accountable; our viewers, listeners and readers do not need simply to throw a shoe at the TV or put their foot through the paper, they can promptly e-mail or tweet us to point out our mistakes. This can be embarrassing, no doubt, but surely makes it more likely we will get it right.

BBC

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BBC Global News will produce original videos for Twitter followers

AdAge
BBC Global News will produce original short videos to be carried in paid tweets starting this fall, Jeanine Poggi reports in AdAge. The videos, called "#BBCTrending," will cover "trending news on social media that day" and go out to the followers of the @BBCWorld account.

Twitter in May announced a program called Amplify that lets partners put preroll ads in videos they share. "Twitter's media partners in the Amplify program have typically tweeted clips from existing TV programming thus far, not original content created with the platform in mind," Poggi writes.

Here's a sample #BBCTrending video. It features a controversial talking goat.
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Screen Shot 2013-08-30 at 8.05.51 AM

How taxonomies help news organizations understand and categorize their content

News organizations such as the Associated Press, The New York Times and Thomson Reuters are teaching computers to categorize text and images by building robust taxonomies that their systems use to tag news content.

Adding digital information under the … Read more

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New CEO Mark Thompson ends first week with memo to New York Times staff

At the end of his first week as CEO of The New York Times, Mark Thompson was the subject of yet another story in his new paper about his tenure at the BBC. The latest story revealed that a letter sent in his name detailed sex abuse allegations against former host Jimmy Savile, allegations Thompson denies having known at the time. On Friday, Thompson sent this memo to staff, which does not mention the BBC scandal:
As I finish my first week at The New York Times Company, I would like to thank the many people I've already met. As you'd expect, Times employees come across as super-smart and totally committed to maintaining the values and quality that the company and its newspapers have always stood for. But I've also been struck by how friendly and welcoming you've been to me. (more...)
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Mark Thompson says he didn’t see letter about BBC allegations sent on his behalf

The New York Times
Mark Thompson says he was not aware of the details in a letter he authorized threatening London paper The Sunday Times with "defamation proceedings" over an article it was preparing about BBC program "Newsnight"'s decision to drop an investigation into sex-abuse charges against one of its stars, Jimmy Savile, reports Matthew Purdy.

The letter was prepared in September by a law firm and "included a summary of the alleged abuse, including the allegation that some abuse might have occurred at the BBC," Purdy writes. It "appears to have been the last in a string of opportunities for Mr. Thompson, while director general, to have gotten a fuller picture of Mr. Savile and the 'Newsnight' program," he writes.

Thompson is now the CEO of the New York Times Co. He declined to comment for the Times' article, but a former aide told Purdy, “It’s not clear if he was shown it, but he doesn’t remember reading it." (more...)
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BBC reaches a settlement with politician it called a sex abuser

Sky News | The New York Times | "The Daily Show" | Time
The BBC has reached a settlement with Lord McAlpine, the politician it erroneously fingered as a sexual predator in a report on its "Newsnight" program.

But how did the BBC botch that report so soundly -- especially after after it killed a "Newsnight" story about a BBC presenter credibly accused of pedophilia?

It's not for lack of editorial process, Sarah Lyall and Nicholas Kulish write: After a 2004 scandal,

The corporation also appointed a deputy director general in charge of news operations; established a “journalism board” to monitor editorial policy; issued numerous new guidelines on journalistic procedures; and put an increasing emphasis on “compliance” — a system in which managers are required to file cumbersome forms flagging dozens of potential trouble spots, from bad language to “disturbing content” like exorcism or beheadings, in every program taped for broadcast.
(more...)
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