Articles about "BBC"


BBC News director asks staff to keep the pedophilia crisis to itself

Telegraph | Broadcast | Eyes to the right
BBC News Acting Director Fran Unsworth is drawing the scorn of the Internet Tuesday morning after asking the staff not to tweet or talk publicly about the organization's ongoing scandals.

"It would be helpful if some of our problems were not played out publically across social media and in the pages of the national press," Unsworth wrote, according to the Telegraph. "We need a collective and collegiate sense of all pulling together to restore trust in the BBC’s news output."

The full email was reprinted by Broadcast magazine. (more...)
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Entwistle announced his resignation in central London, Saturday Nov. 10, 2012. (Max Nash/AP)

BBC in ‘ghastly mess’ after resignations, as its former leader takes reins at NYT

Still reeling from the fallout of a sex abuse story it spiked, the British Broadcasting Corporation is now in even more peril because of another sex abuse story that never should have been broadcast. Director General George Entwistle resigned Saturday over a report that falsely accused a former British politician, Lord McAlpine, of child sex abuse.

Acting BBC Director General Tim Davie told staff in an email, "I am determined to give the BBC the clarity and leadership it deserves in the next few weeks."

• BBC director of news Helen Boaden and deputy director of news Steve Mitchell have temporarily "stepped aside" -- not resigned -- though neither "had anything at all to do with the failed 'Newnight' investigation into Lord McAlpine," the BBC said. Iain Overton was editor of the British Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which produced the botched McAlpine report with the BBC; he resigned Monday. (more...)
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NYT: Mark Thompson ‘missed opportunities’ to address BBC scandal

The New York Times | New York | Seeking Alpha | Guardian
Incoming New York Times Company CEO Mark Thompson "repeatedly missed opportunities" when he was director general of the BBC to learn why one of its news programs canceled an investigation into sex-abuse claims against entertainer Jimmy Savile, reports Matthew Purdy in The New York Times. Thompson "said he knew nothing of the Savile investigation before it was canceled by the editor of the BBC’s 'Newsnight' program," Purdy writes.
As for what he knew afterward, his statements have evolved: He first said he was unaware of the investigation, but then acknowledged he was subsequently told of its cancellation by a reporter at a cocktail party. He said while he “may have formed an impression” about possible areas of a Savile investigation, including his charity work, he was unaware of child-sexual-abuse accusations.
Other news organizations covered the "Newsnight" decision, and clips from coverage of the BBC were discussed in daily executive conference calls, Purdy writes. In testimony to Parliament, new DG George Entwistle explained that, in Purdy's words, "only the rarest program issue reaches the director general."
An incredulous member of Parliament’s Culture, Media and Sport committee, Damian Collins, said “if this doesn’t qualify, you wonder what the bar is.”
(more...)
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Report: Mark Thompson’s office was contacted twice about BBC killing news program

The New York Times | The Daily Mail
Incoming New York Times Co. CEO Mark Thompson's BBC office was contacted twice by journalists seeking comment after one of the network's news shows spiked a program investigating claims of rampant sexual abuse by a BBC star. Neither request made it to Thompson personally, his spokesperson told Britain's Sunday Times.

Thompson, who was the BBC's director general until September and was named the Times Co.'s CEO in August, has said he only heard about the decision in late 2011, at a party where BBC journalist Caroline Hawley asked him about the segment, which had been scheduled to run on a show called "Newsnight" and investigated a longtime BBC personality named Jimmy Savile. But in The Sunday Times this weekend, a journalist named Miles Goslett wrote that he'd filed a freedom of information request for internal BBC correspondence regarding the decision, and that Thompson's office referred him to the BBC's media relations department when he called for comment after that request was denied. (more...)
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syriaIraq

BBC mistakenly uses image of Iraq in Syrian massacre story

A 2003 photo taken in Iraq was mistakenly used by the BBC website to illustrate a report about the recent massacre in Houla, Syria.

The Daily Telegraph reports that the image of a child jumping over body bags was … Read more

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BBC launching an online corrections page

Journalism.co.uk reports today that the BBC will soon introduce an online corrections page.

The news came in an announcement from the BBC Trust that it is launching public consultation on its complaints process. The goal is to introduce changes that … Read more

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BBC News editor: We may use social media photos without permission ‘in exceptional situations’

BBC News
BBC News has been criticized recently for using, without photographers' permission, photos posted on social networks. In response to a complaint, someone from BBC News had wrongly contended that photos posted to Twitter were "in the public domain" because they are "available to most people who have a computer." Social media editor Chris Hamilton clarifies that the organization's policy is to "make every effort to contact people who've taken photos we want to use in our coverage and ask for their permission before doing so." However, Hamilton noted, "where there is a strong public interest and often time constraints," a senior editor may decide to "use a photo before we've cleared it." || Related: Why do news organizations still attribute images and video to the platforms they were hosted on?
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BBC journalists take part in second one-day strike

Guardian / Press Gazette
Unionized BBC journalists are taking part in a second, one-day strike to protest the organization's plans to cut 387 jobs due to government funding cuts. The Guardian reports that another 1,000 journalism jobs could be lost due to a planned merger of BBC News and BBC World Service. Journalists walked out for 24 hours in July, too; that stoppage stopped the BBC from airing some television and radio news programs.
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BBC reporter takes her 60,000 Twitter followers to competitor ITV

The Wall
Laura Kuenssberg built up more than 60,000 followers of her @BBCLauraK Twitter account as chief political correspondent for the BBC. Then last week, she became the business editor of ITV and renamed her account to @ITVLauraK. Tom Callow at The Wall blog questions whether the BBC should have a claim to retain control of the account:
"Many people, myself included, wanted to follow the updates of the BBC’s Chief Political Correspondent (@BBCLauraK). We might be less interested in updates from the ITV’s Business Editor."
Social media account ownership is complicated by many factors -- who created the account, was it prior to employment, does the name include the media brand, was the account use primarily professional or personal? There's rarely a clear answer unless a news organization and staffer get an agreement in writing, in advance, on what will happen to a specific account when a journalist moves on, which may be something your organization should do. || Earlier: The BBC released a new social media policy, but it doesn't address this issue
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BBC social media policy insists ‘second pair of eyes’ review news updates for Twitter or Facebook

The Next Web
The BBC's new "social media guidance" strictly requires a "second pair of eyes" to review any staff social media updates related to news reporting. The policy is far more relaxed when it comes to staffers using personal social media accounts for personal things. For those cases, it simply lists some "considerations," which it summarizes as "don't do anything stupid." But the section about social media messages carried out "in the name of BBC News" includes this paragraph (caps and bold are from the original document):
The golden rule for our core news, programme or genre activity is that whatever is published – on Twitter, Facebook or anywhere else - MUST HAVE A SECOND PAIR OF EYES PRIOR TO PUBLICATION. A second check might well avoid you saying or linking to something unwise which could land you, or the BBC, in trouble. While there's recognition that staffing levels can get in the way of this, especially small teams in overseas offices, every effort should nonetheless be made to ensure this practice is adhered to unless there are urgent live deadlines.
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