BBC

Armed Thai soldiers and local officials inspect the Patong beach during a clean up operation Wednesday, July 9, 2014, in Phuket, southern Thailand. Thailand's new military junta sent soldiers to one of the country's best known beaches Wednesday to evict food hawkers, massage huts and other illegal vendors as part of a campaign to clean-up the country's image and enforce laws that have long been ignored. (AP Photo/Krissada Mueanhawong)

BBC plans to expand past Facebook in Thailand

Armed Thai soldiers

Armed Thai soldiers and local officials inspect the Patong beach during a cleanup operation in Phuket, southern Thailand. (AP Photo/Krissada Mueanhawong)

On Thursday, the BBC launched a Thai news feed through Facebook to help get news in and out of a country with a military that has tightly controlled information since it took over in a coup in May.

And they’re planning to expand to other social media platforms, Charlotte Morgan, head of International Communications for BBC News, told Poynter in an e-mail. Facebook will be the BBC’s content management system using the Notes feature, she said, and the BBC is focusing on publishing short stories with four to five paragraphs.

“The content will be around international news, international reactions to the situation in Thailand, news from Thailand – through the BBC and also content from agencies, Thai media, stringers and social newsgathering,” Morgan said. Read more

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BBC uses Facebook to get around Thai military censors

BBC | The Telegraph

The BBC launched a Facebook news stream in Thailand on Thursday. The initiative “follows the military coup in May after which international channels, including BBC World News TV, were taken off air temporarily,” the Beeb reports.

The news org says it plans to run the “pop-up” service for three months. Stories will be in Thai and English.

The news stream “is targeting Thailand’s 24 million Facebook users, among a population of 67 million Thais,” Damien McElroy writes for The Telegraph. “There are over 13 million in Bangkok alone, a figure that has quadrupled in just 12 months.”

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

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Google removes Guardian, BBC search results; Facebook drives 25% of Hearst’s traffic

— Google has notified The Guardian and BBC that certain articles will no longer appear in European searches, Mark Scott writes at The New York Times Bits blog. A European court ruling allows people “to ask for links to information about themselves to be removed from search results.”

— As news organizations fail to take advantage of the surge in mobile ad spending, Poynter’s Rick Edmonds says his hunch “is that getting video right and getting stronger mobile ad performance will go hand in hand for news sites.”

— Facebook drives 25 percent of traffic to Hearst magazines, up from 4 percent last year. Lucia Moses explains the publisher’s new focus on Facebook at Digiday.

— Vice Media will move to a larger Brooklyn headquarters, Laura Kusisto reports in The Wall Street Journal. Read more

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BBC journalists will hold strike ballot

The Guardian

Journalists with the BBC will vote on whether or not to strike, Mark Sweney reported Tuesday in The Guardian.

Members of the National Union of Journalists are to be balloted over industrial action after passing a motion calling for an overhaul of the pay gap with programme-makers and senior management.

BBC Radio also announced today that 65 jobs will be cut, Jason Deans reported in The Guardian. Last week, Neil Midgley reported in Forbes that the BBC would cut 500 jobs from the news division. Meanwhile, members of the National Union of Journalists cite a 1 percent pay raise granted to some employees this year and perks and pay for those at the top.

The motion also called for a “radical overhaul of executive pay and perks”, such as the “generous” expense accounts and car allowances that senior managers enjoy.

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Newspapers in Myanmar print black front pages

A vender sits by local weekly news journals with their front pages printed black with letters saying “By opposing recent arrest and sentencing of journalists including a video journalist of DVB (Democratic Voice of Burma)” at a roadside shop Friday, April.11, 2014, in Yangon, Myanmar. Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country’s media climate is worsening. (AP Photo/Khin Maung Win)

BBC | Associated Press

Newspapers in Myanmar ran blacked-out front pages on Friday, the BBC and the Associated Press reported.

Several private newspapers in Myanmar printed black front pages on Friday to protest the recent arrests and sentencing of journalists, in the latest sign the country’s media climate is worsening.

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Happy april fools' day stamp

Hoax earthquake letter rings in April Fools’ Day

Los Angeles Times | The Guardian | BBC

No, California, the U.S. Geological Survey is not warning people that a large quake is on its way.

It’s early yet in the U.S., but by now, April Fools’ jokes are pretty much all played out in the UK. The Guardian collected the best jokes of the day, including their own, reporting that Scotland might switch to driving on the right, (which I did see on my Twitter feed this morning and remember thinking, hmmm, wonder how that’s gonna work.)

“It sends out an explicit signal: we are part of Europe,” said one of the brains behind the scheme. “The little Englanders who want out of Europe are the only ones driving on the left-hand side.

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Why TV journalists ‘test the system’ with stunt reporting: It sometimes works

New York Post | BBC | The New York Times

On Tuesday, two CNN producers tried to sneak into the World Trade Center site. Several times. They were arrested, Larry Celona, Kevin Fasick and Bruce Golding reported for the New York Post.

Connor Boals, 26, and Yon Pomrenze, 35, made multiple attempts to get onto Ground Zero before being arrested shortly after 2 p.m., law enforcement sources said.

The pair initially tried to get through a gate at Vesey and Washington streets, with a source saying they told the cop who stopped them that “if a 16-year-old could get on the site, they should be able to get in.”

Yon Pomrenze, left, and Connor Fieldman Boals, are shown after their arrests on Tuesday, March 25.
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You can use Getty Images for free, sort of

The Wall Street Journal | The Verge | BBC | Nieman Lab

The “sort of” is you’re using Twitter, Tumblr or “non-commercial WordPress blogs,” Georgia Wells reported in The Wall Street Journal on Wednesday after Getty Images announced they’d make a whole lot of images available for free.

On Wednesday, the company unveiled the embed tool, which will allow users to include images on websites, such as non-commercial WordPress blogs. The eligible images also come with buttons for Tumblr and Twitter, where a link to the image can be shared. (The image itself doesn’t appear on Twitter, however.)

Poynter is a nonprofit, and we do use WordPress. But we do sell ads against our content. So I think it’s OK that I pulled this shot this morning, because, well, look at that guy. Read more

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In a lecture at the British Library Monday, BBC Director of News and Current Affairs James Harding said journalists upset by the changes to their industry are “missing the point.” Not only is Harding “extremely optimistic about the future of journalism,” he said, “I think this is the most exciting time to be a journalist since the advent of television.”

Professional journalists cannot expect to have the influence we once did, but, if we’re clever, if we’re innovative and if we’re trustworthy, we can earn it. This is because we live at a time when there is an unprecedented hunger for information and ideas, because the proliferation of new news providers means the number of working journalists is, actually, rising, because the tools available for story telling and story getting are more powerful than ever and because, as I hope to make clear, the new technologies have unexpectedly revealed the enduring value of some old principles in journalism.

The tools of technology also make it an exceptionally exciting time to be going after a story. Of course, a journalist is a fool to rely solely on Google or Wikipedia for information. But they are just as stupid to ignore them: the modern search engine has given us all a running start at any story. Citizen journalism is not just a competitor to established news media, but a streaming source of information and ideas for it. And the internet has turned our audience into a giant fact-checking machine: journalists are more directly and immediately accountable; our viewers, listeners and readers do not need simply to throw a shoe at the TV or put their foot through the paper, they can promptly e-mail or tweet us to point out our mistakes. This can be embarrassing, no doubt, but surely makes it more likely we will get it right.

BBC

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BBC Global News will produce original videos for Twitter followers

AdAge

BBC Global News will produce original short videos to be carried in paid tweets starting this fall, Jeanine Poggi reports in AdAge. The videos, called “#BBCTrending,” will cover “trending news on social media that day” and go out to the followers of the @BBCWorld account.

Twitter in May announced a program called Amplify that lets partners put preroll ads in videos they share. “Twitter’s media partners in the Amplify program have typically tweeted clips from existing TV programming thus far, not original content created with the platform in mind,” Poggi writes.

Here’s a sample #BBCTrending video. It features a controversial talking goat.
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