Articles about "Best Practices: Leadership and Management"


BRANDthumbnail

PoynterVision: @webjournalist on how he builds his personal brand

How has Robert Hernandez created a successful persona on Twitter as @webjournalist with over 11,500 followers? He says he decided to be just who he is.

Hernandez, digital journalism professor at USC Annenberg, adjunct faculty at Poynter and music fan, told me that he talks about the many projects he has started, including #wjchat for journalists to discuss media topics via Twitter or beta testing Google Glass, and he tells jokes and quotes song lyrics.

His parting advice: “Be genuine when you engage with others,” he wrote in a Twitter direct message to me. “Be genuine in who you follow and learn from.”


//

Related: Tips for Storytellers: Your personal brand | How journalists can build their own powerful brands | As brands start building digital newsrooms, what do they need to succeed? Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Depositphotos_4097837_xs

PoynterVision: New managers can reframe conversations for success

New managers need to know what their team expects of them when they step into their new roles, says Jill Geisler, Poynter’s senior faculty in leadership and management. Geisler asks a couple of questions to help new managers reframe the conversation for success.


//

Related Training: Managing Change: Creating Strategies, Setting Priorities | Innovation at Work: Helping New Ideas Succeed Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Personality inventory

PoynterVision: Use Myers-Briggs to understand your coworkers

Poynter’s senior faculty in leadership and management Jill Geisler uses the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in her leadership seminars at Poynter. She introduces the test to new managers and experienced leaders to help them understand themselves better and better manage their staffs. Geisler, a certified practitioner of Myers-Briggs, says knowing your Myers-Briggs type can help you find harmony with your colleagues.


//

Related NewsU training: What Great Bosses Know About Leadership Styles | Advice for the Newly Named News Director | Challenging Conversations: A Step-by-Step Guide for Great Bosses | Managing Change: Creating Strategies, Setting Priorities Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
When managers fumble, they need to work at repairing their reputations. (Depositphotos)

When managers fumble: 5 tips for repairing your reputation

We customarily think of managers as the men and women who pass judgment on the performance of others.

But managers are evaluated, too. It may come in the form of annual reviews, employee surveys or union grievances. They may get feedback from conversations with colleagues and staff. 

And from those interactions, even good managers learn that they have performance gaps. That’s a nice way of saying the boss has some flaws.

Because the managers in our Poynter programs get 360-degree feedback from colleagues, I get to see a lot of compliments, along with solid, constructive critiques of bosses. Among the more common concerns:

  • Delegate more, micromanage less
  • Listen more, interrupt less
  • Keep people better informed
  • Cool that temper
  • Disconnect from digital devices during conversations and meetings
  • Distribute work equitably
  • Set clear priorities
  • Follow up on conversations and emails
  • Provide better feedback
  • Post work schedules on time
  • Don’t let underperformers cause extra work for others

The real test of a manager’s character is how he or she responds to such feedback. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
manage_small2

How managers can lead newsrooms in a digital age

Digital First Media Editor-in-Chief Jim Brady doesn’t know who Olivia Pope is, but is more than willing to find out about the central character in the TV series “Scandal.”

That openness to the interests of diverse workers can be counted among the new skills required of leaders managing today’s digital staffs, the topic of a workshop Saturday at the Online News Association conference in Atlanta.

Brady said when he first became a manager, he modeled himself after Lou Grant, the grumpy, bombastic editor in the television series of the same name who ruled his newsroom with a top-down management style. By doing so, Brady admits, he probably alienated his reporters.

“Today, you have to listen to everyone else or you will fail,” he said.

Managers further need to empower workers and encourage experimentation. Callie Schweitzer, director of digital innovation at Time magazine, recalled that when the government shutdown caused the National Zoo’s panda cam to go dark, the magazine set up its own livestream with a stuffed animal, drawing a devoted audience. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
question mark abstract

7 questions managers should ask before assuming someone is ‘lazy’

I wince when I hear managers describe an employee as “lazy.” They say it when discussing staffers who do the bare minimum (or less), require far more hand-holding than others, and rarely come up with new ideas.

That’s underperformance, to be sure, and managers need to address it. But declaring people “lazy” brands them with an innate character flaw rather than bad habits that can be turned around. Before I agree that someone has the selfish soul of a slacker, I need to know more.

I want to know what it is they do, or choose not to do. What do they do well? What are their best skills? I want to learn what’s expected of them — and of everyone else on the team — and how it’s been communicated. I ask about what’s been going on in the workplace recently — what changes and challenges.

Most of all, I want to know more about how they’ve been managed. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Question Wall Puzzle Piece Answer Complete Understanding

One simple question that can change a manager’s relationship with staff

When I was a little boy, I remember grown-ups had a favorite question:

“And what do you want to be when you grow up?”

With each year, my answers changed: Cowboy, firefighter, priest, Perry Mason. (Not sure I ever wanted to be an astronaut, probably because I didn’t like roller coasters.)

In college, people kept asking me the same question, and with more urgency; after all, I needed to get a job someday. And over four years, my answer still kept changing: lawyer, teacher, writer.

I finally settled on the writer idea, and the search for a paycheck led me to the rewrite desk of the News American in Baltimore, my hometown. There I faced a new challenge: figuring out how my daily output of crime briefs, obituaries, dictated staff stories and occasional news features would get me to the cover of the Rolling Stone.

In a way, almost 40 years later, I still have that same question:

What do I want to be when I grow up? Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
Leadership8

To change your leadership style, rewrite your leadership story

Have you ever been at a funeral and, as the clergy or relatives or friends offer tribute to the deceased, found yourself wondering:

What will they say about me?

While the Irish Catholic in me winces at thinking about myself during another’s tribute, I must admit the moment of introspection can get me thinking, both personally and professionally.

Now I’ll stop short of recommending that managers attend more funerals. But I’m thinking that those of us who take responsibility for leading others would do well to pause on a regular basis and ask, “What will they say about me?” Especially when we’re still in a position to influence the answer — and we are, every day.

Think about it. Leaders are the authors of their own leadership stories. We write them with every decision we make, every conversation we have, every promotion we award, every meeting we lead. We’ve been writing our story since the day we accepted the job. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Success

How managers can put themselves in a position to succeed

Anyone out there recognize my conundrum?

With each passing year I became more aware that I wasn’t getting enough exercise. Sure, I walked a lot: to and from work, to the supermarket, pretty much everywhere. But nothing that broke much of a sweat.

I even knew what exercise I wanted to do. While I’ve never been a runner, I enjoy fast-walking. The problem was finding the time to do it.

On many a night, I’d go to bed planning to get up early and start the day by walking several miles. Then come morning, I’d wake up and check my email. Or decide to get to the office a little early to get organized. Or just sleep an extra half hour.

So much for good intentions.

One afternoon I was sharing my frustration over this with my colleague, Kelly McBride.

“As soon as you wake up,” Kelly said, “put on your running shoes.”

“That’s it?” I asked. Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
Jeff Bezos

How Bezos, in his first memo to Washington Post staff, achieved believable optimism

Imagine this:

You’re a reporter at The Washington Post and you’ve just heard your company has been bought by, of all people, the guy who created Amazon.

Graham. Bradlee. Woodward. Bernstein.

Bezos?

Think you’re nervous?

Now imagine this:

You’re Jeff Bezos and you know that you’re about to own a building filled with thousands of employees as nervous as that reporter. And you also know that the first thing you say to them will be remembered as vividly as their first kiss, first car or, maybe, the first time they bought a CD on Amazon.

If you’re really good, you’ll say something that leaves them as optimistic about the future of their company as you are.

If you’re really good, you’ll say something they really believe.

Well, I don’t work for the Post, and so I won’t speak for the staff there. But I think the memo that Jeff Bezos released shortly after the purchase was announced is one fine piece of work. Read more

Tools:
4 Comments