Articles about "Blogging"


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Tips for Storytellers: How to make photos better

As a designer and editor, my projects have been made infinitely better because I’ve worked with stellar photojournalists. They’ve patiently schooled me on the importance of capturing the moment, finding the best light and thinking about composition. Here are a … Read more

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A journalist’s guide to using Tumblr

This morning I wrote about how some newsrooms use Tumblr, but getting to know the site can take awhile. So here’s a quick guide to using Tumblr, with Poynter’s Tumblr page as a reference.

This is the Tumblr Dashboard, … Read more

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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer and Tumblr Chief Executive David Karp.  (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

How some news orgs use Tumblr

What do you do with a blog service full of cat GIFs and memes? If you’re Yahoo, you buy it for $1.1 billion. If you’re a media outlet, you use Tumblr as an extension of your brand.

Yahoo CEO
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Ann Coulter makes reference to killing blogger Meghan McCain in controversial column

Fox News | Huffington Post | AnnCoulter.com | New York

Fox News has apparently taken down a column written by Ann Coulter that made a reference to killing blogger Meghan McCain in order to push Republicans to vote for gun-control laws.

The column in question, published on Fox Nation Wednesday, made the apparent joke to point out what it would take for Republicans to join Democrats in passing gun-control legislation. The post, which is still available on Coulter's own blog, began:

Obama has been draping himself in families of the children murdered in Newtown.

MSNBC's Martin Bashir suggested that Republican senators need to have a member of their families killed for them to support the Democrats' gun proposals. (Let's start with Meghan McCain!)

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N.J. judge revives blogger vs. journalist debate

Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press Union County, N.J., prosecutors demanded Tina Renna give them "the names of 16 government officials who she accused online of misusing county generators after Hurricane Sandy," Lilly Chapa reports. Renna claimed privilege, and Superior Court Judge Karen Cassidy has ordered a hearing "to further discuss whether Renna is a journalist as defined under the state shield law," Chapa writes.

Renna's blog The County Watchers chronicles county employees who make six-figure incomes, challenges the county's finances and posts videos from meetings. Prosecutors, Chapa writes, "have argued that Renna cannot be defined as a journalist because she was involved in politics in the past and the blog is biased and often critical of the Union County government."

“I’m a journalist," Renna told Chapa. "If I can’t protect my sources I’m out of business. I wouldn’t want people to give me information that would put them in danger, and I don’t see why they’d want to do that either.”

The (Newark) Star-Ledger editorial board supported Renna, writing:
New Jersey applies its shield law liberally, and it shouldn’t hinge on whether someone is a professional, nonpartisan or even reliable journalist. It’s a functional test: Does Renna gather information that’s in the public interest and publish it? Yes. What’s at issue here is whether she’s connected to the news media. That’s the challenge: If we let any blogger be covered by the shield law, so many people will claim the privilege that the exception could swallow up the rule. A line must be drawn, but the courts haven’t identified one. So it depends on the facts of each case.
In this case, they conclude, "Yes, she can be a little wild, she’s not the same as a professional reporter and she drives local officials crazy. But part of democracy is putting up with Tina Renna." Related: Crystal Cox was a recent focus of blogger-vs.-journalist scuffles: "most journalists will not want to include Cox in their camp," Kashmir Hill wrote in 2011 (Forbes) | Debate about Crystal Cox blogging case misses a key legal point (Poynter)
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Andrew Sullivan announces shift to independent, reader-funded blog

Daily Beast
After six years of affiliating his popular blog with major media companies Time, The Atlantic and most recently the Daily Beast, Andrew Sullivan announced he's returning to independence.

As of Feb. 1, the blog will live at andrewsullivan.com without any ads, sponsors or investment backing. Just Sullivan and a couple of colleagues blogging -- and hopefully, readers paying. Sullivan is asking for $19.99 a year to subscribe ("around a nickel a day").

Sullivan calls it "the purest, simplest model for online journalism: you, us, and a meter. Period. No corporate ownership, no advertising demands, no pressure for pageviews ... just a concept designed to make your reading experience as good as possible, and to lead us not into temptation." (more...)
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Most journalists now get story ideas from social media sources, survey says

Oriella | Journalism.co.uk
An annual global survey of journalists by public relations firm Oriella finds that more than half now use social media as a source of story ideas, and nearly half use blogs to find angles and ideas.

Among journalists in North America, the rates were even higher -- 62 percent said they draw news from trusted sources on Twitter or Facebook, while 64 percent rely on well-known blogs as a source of story ideas. However, journalists said they were much less inclined to use information from an unfamiliar social media user or blog.

The study's findings are significant, but so is its margin of error: It's based on an online survey of 613 journalists in 16 countries, with likely fewer than 100 respondents in the U.S. and Canada. (more...)
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Journalism professor accepts challenge to blog for Business Insider

College Media Matters | Business Insider
When University of Tampa journalism professor Dan Reimold criticized Business Insider financial blogger Joe Weisenthal, Henry Blodget responded that Reimold "would fail miserably" if he tried to keep up with Weisenthal's around-the-clock blogging and tweeting. Reimold responds, "Sir, just name the day.  I’ll pay for my own plane ticket."  Blodget writes:
Let us know when you'll be here (we can help with the place to stay). We'll give you a desk right near Joe Weisenthal and you can crank for as long as you like. And we'll also document the whole thing--our readers will love it. Can't wait!
It looks like this thing is on. (more...)
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Elizabeth Flock will blog for U.S. News & World Report

Elizabeth Flock, who resigned from The Washington Post in April after a misattributed blog post drew a gnarly editor's note, has a new gig. She'll be lead writer on U.S. News & World Report's Washington Whispers blog, which was written by Paul Bedard before he decamped for The Washington Examiner.

Reached by phone, Flock mostly referred me to her tweet announcing her new job. She said the social issues piece would mean writing about race, gender and immigration.

Post Ombudsman Patrick Pexton weighed in on Flock's departure in April, saying the paper had failed her. He wrote that he had spoken to other bloggers there.
They said that they felt as if they were out there alone in digital land, under high pressure to get Web hits, with no training, little guidance or mentoring and sparse editing. Guidelines for aggregating stories are almost nonexistent, they said. And they believe that, even if they do a good job, there is no path forward. Will they one day graduate to a beat, covering a crime scene, a city council or a school board? They didn’t know. So some left; others are thinking of quitting.
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Business Insider’s Joe Weisenthal is more prolific than you’ll ever be

“In the intensely competitive world of financial blogging, dominated by young men who work long hours and comment on every new development, Weisenthal stands apart by starting earlier, writing more, publishing faster.

“During the course of an average 16-hour day, Weisenthal writes 15 posts, ranging from charts with a few lines of explanatory text to several hundred words of closely reasoned analysis. He manages nearly a dozen reporters, demanding and redirecting story ideas. He fiddles incessantly with the look and contents of the site. And all the while he holds a running conversation with the roughly 19,000 people who follow his Twitter alter ego, the Stalwart. He spars, jokes, asks and answers questions, advertises his work and, in the spirit of our time, reports on his meals, his whereabouts and whatever else is on his mind….

“Some of what he writes is air and sugar. Some of it is wrong or incomplete or misleading. But he delivers jolts of sharp, original insight often enough to hold the attention of a high-powered audience that includes economists like The Times columnist Paul Krugman and Wall Street heavies like the hedge-fund manager Douglas Kass and the bond investor Jeff Gundlach.”

Binyamin Appelbaum, The New York Times Magazine

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