Articles about "Bloomberg BusinessWeek"


Scott Olson shot both Businessweek’s and Time’s covers this week

The work of Getty Images photographer Scott Olson is featured on both Bloomberg Businessweek’s and Time’s covers this week:

bw-cover-ferguson

time-cover-ferguson

Olson was arrested and released in Ferguson, Missouri, on Monday. He also took this iconic shot of the unrest there:

On his HBO show Sunday, John Oliver noted that CNN used the shot extensively, despite the fact that it shows a mailbox that says “Fuck the Police.” (Fast-forward to 6:25.)

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Businessweek gives Piketty the Tiger Beat treatment

Megan McArdle’s Bloomberg Businessweek story on French economist Thomas Piketty gets a cover that reflects the unusual interest that’s greeted his book “Capital in the Twenty-First Century.”

Yep, that’s Justin Bieber up top.


Related: Businessweek explains how it made the cover | Businessweek names Rob Vargas its new creative director Read more

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Businessweek names Rob Vargas its new creative director

Rob Vargas will replace Richard Turley as Bloomberg Businessweek’s creative director, Editor Josh Tyrangiel told staffers Tuesday. Tracy Ma will be be deputy creative director.

Turley announced he was leaving last month.

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Businessweek’s creative director leaves

Richard Turley | FishbowlNY

Richard Turley, the creative director of Bloomberg Businessweek, is leaving the publication for MTV. “[I]t’s time for me to learn something new and work with different content for a different audience,” he writes on his Tumblr.

Turley says Businessweek Editor Josh Tyrangiel is “Hands down the best boss and editor I have ever worked for, but also and more importantly – my partner in crime, and someone who deserves far more credit for the design of the magazine than he ever allows himself to receive.” Asked by email about a replacement, Bloomberg Businessweek spokesperson Rachel Nagler said, “Richard is amazing. We wish him nothing but the best, and we hope to make an announcement in the near future.”

Turley came to Businessweek from The Guardian. Under him, the magazine reinvented itself as a visual powerhouse, running bold and often cheeky covers like this one from last summer about hedge-fund managers:

In an interview with Katie Myrick last year, Turley noted the magazine produces 50 covers every year: “Out of those fifty, one or two might be considered provocative, and naturally those are the ones that get zero’d in on.” He continued:

I hope though, that almost all our covers are considered at least ‘good’. Because that is the primary aim, despite what you may read or think about me.

Earlier this year, Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin B. Smith said the company planned to follow Businessweek’s design innovations and apply “a similar design standard to all of our media platforms.” Read more

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Bloomberg plans Businessweek-style ‘design innovation’ across all platforms

Medium

In a memo to staffers, Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin B. Smith lays out marching orders for the company amid standard media-CEO pronouncements (“Technology is disrupting every distribution platform. Consumers are redefining decades-old consumption habits”).

The company plans to shift “our focus to global business in order to attract and engage an even broader audience of business decision makers.” It wants to build “a portfolio of new digital assets that better align our content offerings to global business audience segments.” It’s going to put more money into print and radio, and “compete vigorously with a strong and expanding global television product.”

Smith says “Bloomberg Businessweek’s sensibility and range — witty, visual, forward-looking and global — will power our march into the larger global business audience across all platforms, while maintaining weekly print editions.” And it will use Businessweek’s approach to design in particular:

In an increasingly commoditized media landscape, great design can be a powerful differentiator. Bloomberg Businessweek’s revival has been in large part due to the brand’s success with design innovation. Our strategy calls for applying a similar design standard to all of our media platforms.

Herewith, some of Bloomberg Businessweek’s covers over the past year.

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Bloomberg Businessweek changes logo for Twitter IPO cover

The cover originally looked like the New Yorker’s Eustace Tilley mascot, but with a bird for a head, the magazine explains in a “cover trail” feature. But lawyers were “not into it,” and the next step was to “pretend it’s 1920, when people were full of class and sophistication, and we imagine we’re Henry Luce doing a cover about bird fancying or something.”

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Businessweek’s provocative hedge-fund cover

The cover of Bloomberg Businessweek’s July 15 cover tackles the gap between hedge-funds’ reputation and their performance in a memorable manner:

Asked about whether the placement of the arrows was intentional, Bloomberg Businessweek spokesperson Rachel Nagler said via email “Could be up to the reader to decide…but we do take great care to be very precise when creating our covers.” Read more

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Rupert Murdoch is on Bloomberg Businessweek’s cover

Two years later, Murdoch has dodged much more than the pie,” Felix Gillette writes of the News Corp honcho.

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Bloomberg Businessweek expands non-postal delivery

Bloomberg Businessweek is expanding its alternate delivery program via a partnership with Gannett, the magazine will announce Monday. Subscribers in Cincinnati, Asheville, N.C., and 13 other markets will by July be able to receive their magazines via Gannett’s newspaper-delivery apparatus.

Alternate delivery systems will become more important for many weekly magazines and community newspapers if the the United States Postal Service goes through with its proposal to eliminate Saturday delivery. In February, Businessweek’s head of manufacturing and distribution, Bernie Schraml, told Poynter that one issue with alternate delivery is that the USPS prohibits private services from delivering to customers’ mailboxes. Read more

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Businessweek features ‘erasable’ cover about Snapchat

Businessweek. Underwear. Two words that previously were strangers. Until this week’s cover story about the photo app Snapchat, which lets people send one another disappearing photos. Guess what it’s mostly used for.

Felix Gillette’s story about Snapchat is illustrated with an animated GIF of the cover photos disappearing. Read more

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