Articles about "Bloomberg News"


Josh Tyrangiel will oversee all editorial content at Bloomberg Media

A memo from Bloomberg Media Group CEO Justin B. Smith says Josh Tyrangiel “is proving there is little he cannot take on” while he and Smith craft a “new direction for Bloomberg Media.”

Tyrangiel will “be the editorial lead for everything we do from magazines to TV to radio, digital and live events and continue to oversee Bloomberg News’s Projects team and the Data Viz and Rankings teams,” Smith writes. The announcement “is long overdue as Josh has unofficially been playing this role for some time.”
Full memo:

As you know, Josh Tyrangiel has been working around the clock as my partner in leading our new direction for Bloomberg Media. He has taken the helm at Bloomberg TV and led the development of our new digital-first brands, all while continuing to oversee Bloomberg Businessweek and the Projects & Investigations team at Bloomberg News (which by the way are stronger than ever).

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Bloomberg publications await launch dates, alt-weeklies get together on a story

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Where are Bloomberg’s new verticals? Its politics site will launch in October, “30 days before the 2014 Midterms,” Joe Pompeo reports. Bloomberg Business, Bloomberg Markets and Bloomberg Pursuits have “no hard launch dates,” Pompeo writes. “‘It’s still mostly chatter about strategy with no product being delivered,’ said one executive who was not authorized to speak on the record. ‘People want to see something on the table, basically.’” (Capital)
  2. Pulitzers have a new boss: Former Concord Monitor Editor Mike Pride will become the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes this September. (NYT) | Pride talks with Kristen Hare: “What the Pulitzers really have to do, like every other institution associated with journalism, they have to change with the times and the times are changing very quickly.” (Poynter)
  3. Brown Moses is launching a site for crowdsourced reporting: Bellingcat will give citizen journalists “a chance to learn what I’ve learnt over the last two years by trial and error,” Eliot Higgins, a.k.a.
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Google protesters arrested; what @SavedYouAClick won’t do

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Net neutrality protesters reportedly arrested at Google HQ: Valleywag’s Nitasha Tiku and TechCrunch’s Natasha Lomas report that members of a group called Occupy Google were arrested outside Google’s Mountain View, California, headquarters early this morning. (Valleywag; TechCrunch)
  2. Source spot: New York Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan draws a line between “serious and valid use of confidentiality” and anonymity granted for sources relaying “what is often, in essence, officially approved government communication, or for promoting their own political agenda.” (NYT)
  3. Phone-hacking stories you might actually want to read: The criminal case against several former News Corp employees “is not the final word on whether either editor, News Corp., or much of the British tabloid press has betrayed the principles of journalism,” Ken Auletta writes.
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Morning media roundup: Anonymous sources, FOIA ‘terrorism,’ Chelsea Clinton’s salary

Twice in the last two weeks, New York Times reporters got burned by anonymous sources, Jack Shafer writes. The Times and The Washington Post “tend to rely more heavily on” anonymous sources “than other print outlets” — “In the past four days, the Post cited unnamed sources in at least 18 pieces and the Times did the same in 17 stories ranging from the Iraq civil war to a smartphone app that predicts what a user will type next.”

• “I have nothing against anonymous sources who help guide reporters toward the verifiable — I just draw the line at routinely printing what they say,” Shafer writes.

10 MEDIA STORIES

  1. Jason Leopold was a sloppy journalist who realized that FOIA scoops meant “no one sharing it had to worry about whether they could trust the person who had unearthed the documents; they only had to trust the documents themselves.” Jason Fagone writes a fascinating profile of a self-described “FOIA terrorist.” (Matter)
  2. Former employees at the Salt Lake Tribune have filed suit to suspend changes to the newspaper’s joint operating agreement with the Deseret News.
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National Geographic names Susan Goldberg its new EIC

The National Geographic Society Wednesday announced it was reorganizing its media properties. Susan Goldberg is the new editor-in-chief of National Geographic magazine, the society said in a press release. Her predecessor, Chris Johns, will be chief content officer and will be charged with overseeing “the print and digital expression of National Geographic’s editorial content across platforms.”

“Our efforts need to be organized around our purpose, not our platforms,” National Geographic Society President and CEO Gary Knell said in a press release. Knell left NPR in 2013 to run NatGeo; when he was at NPR he said one of his first orders of business was to “smash together the digital and so-called audio journalists.”

Speaking at the Nieman Foundation last week, the NPR CEO said “we should eliminate these distinctions.

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Another Bloomberg News journalist resigns over company’s handling of China story

Jim Romenesko | The New York Times | NPR

A Bloomberg News editor resigned from the company Monday citing the mishandling of an investigative story from China, Jim Romenesko reports.

Ben Richardson, an Asia editor at large, told Romenesko by email that he also left because of what he termed Bloomberg’s misleading statements to the global press that disparaged the journalists who had worked on the story, an investigation into the financial ties between one of China’s wealthiest men and top officials:

Throughout the process, the threat of legal action has hung over our heads if we talked — and still does. That has meant that senior management have had an open field to spin their own version of events.

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China Citizens Movement Trial

Covering China: for foreign and domestic press, self-censorship’s the threat

A plainclothes policeman, center, tries to block a foreign journalist filming while police detain the supporters of Xu Zhiyong near the No. 1 Intermediate People’s Court in Beijing Wednesday. Xu, a legal scholar and founder of the New Citizens movement, is on trial facing a charge organzing a crowd to disrupt public order. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

It’s not easy being a journalist in China these days.

Chinese reporters are facing new government restrictions, including forced training in Marxism and a new written “ideology” exam. Some, pushing the investigative envelope, have been detained, demoted and fired. Bloggers have been arrested under a new law that forbids rumor-mongering.

Meanwhile, foreign journalists have had visa renewals held up by the government, with the threat of expulsion. The standoff grew so contentious that Vice President Joe Biden had to make a personal appeal to China’s president before last-minute visas were issued earlier this month.… Read more

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The New York Times hires Michael Forsythe

The New York Times

Former Bloomberg News reporter Michael Forsythe now works for The New York Times, according to a Times story on Sunday by Christine Haughney.

Forsythe, based in Hong Kong, left Bloomberg News in November after Bloomberg held an investigative story “because of fears that Bloomberg would be expelled from China,” Haughney wrote.

After Bloomberg News published an article in June 2012 on the family wealth of Xi Jinping, at that time the incoming Communist Party chief, sales of Bloomberg terminals in China slowed, as officials ordered state enterprises not to subscribe. Officials also blocked Bloomberg’s website on Chinese servers, and the company has been unable to get residency visas for new journalists.

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China grants press cards to several U.S. journalists

Reuters | The Washington Post | The Guardian

Journalists at Bloomberg News and The New York Times received press cards from China, according to a Thursday report from Reuters. China held up granting the visas to journalists from the Times and Bloomberg after both published stories about Chinese leaders and their families.

William Wan reported Thursday in The Washington Post that one journalist for the Post has been granted a visa, and another got a press pass Thursday as well.

China has long denied or held up visas to retaliate for coverage critical of Communist Party officials, but U.S. reporters say the practice has grown more intense under President Xi Jinping, who took office in March. But this year, entire news organizations, rather than individual reporters, faced threats that they would be kicked out of the country, the journalists said.

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Bloomberg News pays extra if stories ‘move markets’

Business Insider

Breaking a story that moves the market is among several factors considered in bonuses for reporters at Bloomberg News. On Wednesday, Julia La Roche reported on the story for Business Insider.

La Roche writes that the practice isn’t used at other news outlets, and that most people in the industry hadn’t heard of it.

Most of the people we spoke to, especially traders, were startled to hear about this practice, worrying that it might create an incentive for Bloomberg reporters to “push” or stretch stories with the specific aim of moving markets. Traders react instantly to headlines and news stories, and the decisions they make often make or lose significant amounts of money.

La Roche quotes an unnamed person familiar with the Bloomberg incentives as saying that the concerns are overblown.… Read more

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