Articles about "Bloomberg"


Career Beat: Joe Weisenthal heads to Bloomberg

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Joe Weisenthal will host a TV show and develop a market-focused website for Bloomberg. He is executive editor at Business Insider. (Business Insider)
  • Ashkan Soltani will be chief technologist at the Federal Trade Commission. Previously, he was an independent privacy researcher who helped The Washington Post cover the National Security Agency. (WP)
  • Mick Greenwood is head of video at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was managing editor of video at MSN. Richard Giddings is now head of mobile at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was digital editions program manager there. (Time Inc.)

Job of the day: Vice News is looking for an associate producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Here are 37 great journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For journalism students, October through January is internship application season, a pressure cooker of equal parts excitement and anxiety.

It’s our profession’s draft day. By mid-march, most of your classmates will have declared their intention to work at a journalism organization, like a prized NFL recruit putting on their team’s hat in front of a live studio audience.

Don’t get left behind. Some of the applications for the most prestigious news organizations are due in a few weeks time, so work up the courage to request that letter of recommendation, update your résumé and figure out how stamps work.

To make the process a little easier, I’ve compiled a list of some of the best journalism internships I could find on the Web, many of which I applied for myself when I was in school. If you have questions about this list or know some great internships I’ve forgotten, tweet them to #POYinternlist or send me an email: bmullin@poynter.org.

The New York Times James Reston Reporting Fellowship
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: New York City
Pay: $1,000 per week
Description: “Beginning with the second week, the Reston Fellows start work in a section that reflects their skills and area of interest to report and write stories under the guidance of editors or senior reporters. Some stories are assigned, but fellows are encouraged to come up with their own ideas. They also participate in workshops with ranking editors and reporters. The goal of the program is to provide an opportunity for the fellows to stretch their journalistic skills with the help of some of the best reporters and editors in the country.”

The Washington Post
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $750 per week
Description: “Our interns write articles, edit copy, take photographs, design pages and produce graphics. We treat them as staff members during their 12 weeks of employment.”

The Boston Globe
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Boston
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Summer interns work as full-time employees for 12 weeks, between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Interns are paid a weekly wage, and shifts vary. An intern supervisor serves as a writing coach and there are weekly meetings with editors and staff members on a range of issues and topics pertaining to journalism.”

Associated Press Global News Internship
Deadline: Not settled yet; likely the first week of January, per AP spokesman Paul Colford.
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The summer 2014 Global News Internship is a paid, highly selective, 12-week individually tailored training program for students who are aspiring cross-format journalists. Interns must have experience and/or training in video and one other format. They will contribute to AP’s text, video, photo and interactive reporting.”

Reuters Global Journalism Internships
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Major cities throughout the world
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Global Journalism Internships offer talented students and graduates an opportunity to learn and shine in our bureaus internationally. The paid internships are a crash course in hands-on business, political and general news reporting. Every intern will report to a senior editor and be assigned a journalist mentor to provide advice and guidance during the summer. They’re expected to write regularly and deliver in-depth stories during their assignment. Interns will receive several days of formal training before they start work, focused on writing skills, journalism ethics and basic financial knowledge. They may also be able to take advantage of other, regularly scheduled training opportunities during the summer, depending on where they’re based.”

Texas Tribune News Apps Internships
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $5,000 over 10 weeks
Description: “Are you a journalism student or would-be reporter in another major? Know a little bit about HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and/or Python/Django, and would like to continue to hone your skills? Are you passionate about politics, policy and open government? You should join us. You’ll work directly with news apps developers, reporters and editors in the newsroom. Interns are first-class citizens on our team – in the past, they’ve had the opportunity to not only contribute to high-profile projects but to take the lead on them. You’ll get to create data visualizations and maps, participate in an active and friendly newsroom, play a role in editorial meetings and contribute to a number of different beats. We’re looking for someone passionate about web standards and the little details. Someone willing to show their work. Someone looking to learn. If you’re interested, send your resume and links to previous projects and/or your GitHub account to rmurphy@texastribune.org.”

Texas Tribune reporting internship
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $2,000 over 10 weeks
Description: The Texas Tribune internship program provides aspiring journalists the opportunity to hone their reporting skills and learn a host of new ones that will prepare them for the 21st century newsroom. “This is not a teaching hospital,” in the words of our fearless leader, CEO and Editor-in-Chief Evan Smith. We expect interns who are anxious to dive into daily news coverage alongside our seasoned reporting staff. Interns at the Tribune write stories and blog posts, shoot photos and video, develop news apps and assist with our major data projects. Intern work has appeared in Texas editions of The New York Times through our partnership with the most prestigious newspaper in the country.

Reuters Journalism Program
Deadline: Dec. 15
Location: New York, London or Asia
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Reuters Journalism Program offers nine months of hands-on, real-world experience with competitive pay in New York, London and Asia. You will gain a deep grounding in all aspects of financial reporting, work on fast-paced news stories and develop skills in enterprise journalism. The program seeks rising reporters, recent graduates or business professionals who can demonstrate a clear commitment to a career in journalism and an ability to generate story ideas relevant for a Reuters audience.”

The Los Angeles Times
Deadline: Jan. 1
Location: Los Angeles, Washington D.C.
Pay: $700 per week
Description: “Interested in working with some of the best journalists around? We offer 10 weeks of intensive, hands-on experience in a region where big stories are the norm. We place interns throughout the L.A. Times: Metro/Local, Sports, Business, Features (Home, Image, Travel, Food, Mind & Body), Arts & Entertainment, Editorial Pages, Washington, D.C., bureau, Photography/Video, Data Desk, Visualization & Graphics, Design and latimes.com. These are paid internships and summer placements usually run from mid-June to late August.”

The Tampa Bay Times
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: St. Petersburg, Tampa, Clearwater, Port Richey and Brooksville
Pay: $450 per week
Description: “Florida’s largest and best newspaper, with 10 Pulitzer Prizes, is looking for energetic, talented young people for internships in all of its departments. Internships range from 12-week summer experiences to 6-month and 1-year jobs. You will be considered a full staff member and work alongside colleagues who will serve as mentors. Our internship programs are designed to give you hands-on experience to add to your academic credentials.

The South Florida Sun Sentinel
Deadline: Nov. 15
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Pay: $7.93 per hour
Description: “We offer seven paid internships throughout our digital-print newsroom. For 11 intensive weeks, from June to mid-August, you will report and write stories, shoot and edit video-photo, or design. We treat our interns as regular staffers, under the guidance of seasoned journalists. We offer internships in various newsroom departments: Metro-news, business, features, sports, video-photo, design, and our Spanish-language weekly, El Sentinel. We also offer weekly sessions with veteran journalists and senior editors on a wide range of topics, including career advice. It’s hard work and great fun.”

Google Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Around the end of January
Location: Various journalism nonprofits throughout the United States
Pay: $8,000 for 10-weeks, plus $1,000 travel stipend
Description: “The program is aimed at undergraduate, graduate and journalism students interested in using technology to tell stories in new and dynamic ways. The Fellows will get the opportunity to spend the summer contributing to a variety of organizations — from those that are steeped in investigative journalism to those working for press freedom around the world and to those that are helping the industry figure out its future in the digital age.”
Disclaimer: I was a 2014 Google fellow.

Atlantic Media Fellowship Program
Deadline: End of February 2015
Location: Washington, D.C. and New York City
Pay: $25,000 per year, with full benefits
Description: “Atlantic Media offers high-achieving recent college graduates a unique opportunity to participate in the Atlantic Media Fellowship Program. The Program is a structured, year-long paid fellowship for top-tier talent committed to editorial-side or business-side careers in media. Each year we look forward to our new class of Fellows, who add a fresh perspective and new ideas to our company initiatives. As a digital-first company, we have experienced tremendous growth as a result of emphasis on digital initiatives, and our Fellows have been key contributors.”

The Seattle Times
Deadline: Nov. 15.
Location: Seattle
Pay: $540 per week
Description: “The Seattle Times offers paid summer internships to outstanding students pursuing a career in journalism. For 10 weeks, interns work on varied assignments and attend weekly training sessions with members of a Pulitzer Prize-winning staff. Interns receive a skill-development plan and work with a staff mentor to achieve it. Internships are open to sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students attending a four-year college or university. Applicants must have a demonstrated commitment to print and online journalism. At least one previous internship at a daily news organization is preferred, and multimedia experience is a plus.”

Austin American-Statesman
Deadline: Nov. 7
Location: Austin, Texas
Pay: $450 per week, plus free housing.
Description: “Our objective is to help interns grow with challenging assignments. In other words, you won’t spend your time writing police briefs, taking mug shots and running errands. Last summer, one intern finished with three dozen bylines, three-quarters of which were on the front page or the Metro cover.”

The Chicago Tribune
Deadline: Dec. 1
Location: Chicago
Pay: Not listed
Description: “The Chicago Tribune’s newsroom internship program seeks college juniors, seniors and graduate students for 12-week paid internships. Opportunities will be considered in all newsroom departments: metro, sports, business, graphics, copy editing, design, photo/video, entertainment, events, social media and lifestyle.”

The Dallas Morning News
Deadline: Oct. 31
Location: Dallas
Pay: $15 per hour
Description: “We offer several 12-week college internships for news reporting, copy editing, business news, features, sports, photography and our website, dallasnews.com. Interns are treated as full-time staffers and typically, at least one is hired for a full-time position at the conclusion of the internship.”

Student Press Law Center
Deadline: Jan. 31
Location: Washington, D.C.
Pay: $3,500 stipend
Description: “Journalism interns research, write and help edit the Report, the Center’s magazine that chronicles student press law cases and controversies from around the country. Interns also write breaking news and analysis pieces for the Center’s website. Those with an interest in video and multimedia are especially encouraged to apply, and help us create the images that will bring students’ censorship experiences to life.”

The Oregonian
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Portland, Oregon
Pay: $440 per week
Description: “Oregonian Media Group offers a 10-week summer intern program for college students who wish to work as multimedia journalists in The Oregonian newsroom. We’re looking for primarily upperclassmen with previous internship experience who want to work in a digital-first environment doing smart stories for readers of OREGONLIVE.COM online and The Oregonian in print. We want critical thinkers, students who have a portfolio that shows ambition and skill across platforms, reporters and photographers who want to make a difference with readers – however those readers find us.
If selected, you will be assigned to a team for the summer, paired with a staff mentor and provided opportunities to learn from experienced journalists through group discussions with other interns.”

NPR’s Kroc Fellowship:
Deadline: Dec. 31
Location: NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., and member station.
Pay:: $40,000 per year
Description: “The Fellowship is designed to offer exposure to various units at NPR, in both the News and Digital Divisions, and at an NPR Member Station. NPR Kroc Fellows work alongside some of the nation’s most respected reporters, producers and editors and receive regular instruction in writing for radio and on-air performance. The Fellowship begins in August and lasts one year. Fellows receive a stipend of more than $40,000 and benefits, including paid vacation. NPR will provide Kroc Fellows with professional guidance and assist in job placement.”

Pulliam Journalism Fellowship
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Indianapolis and Phoenix
Pay: $650 per week
Description: “You’ll be a member of our newsroom, work hard and gain valuable journalism experience. You get paid, too. Our Pulliam Fellows earn $650/week for the 10-week program. You’ll also get to participate in writing workshops and learn over lunch from some of the best minds in journalism.”

Minneapolis Star Tribune
Deadline: Nov. 1
Location: Minneapolis
Pay:: $706 per week
Description: “The Star Tribune newsroom offers one of the best summer internship programs available in our industry. We select at least 10 candidates for paid 10-week internships each summer. The program targets college and graduate students interested in pursuing careers as reporters, copy editors/multiplatform editors, designers, photographers and multimedia producers.”

Chronicle of Higher Education
Deadline: Jan. Read more

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Career Beat: Naomi Zeichner named editor-in-chief of The Fader

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community.

  • Missy Ryan will be a Pentagon correspondent for The Washington Post. Previously, she was a reporter at Reuters. (The Washington Post)
  • Yumiko Ono is now Asia audience engagement editor at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was managing editor of Wall Street Journal Japan. (@raju)
  • Trip Gabriel is now a political correspondent for The New York Times. He was a national correspondent there. Jennifer Steinhauer is now mid-atlantic bureau chief for The New York Times. Previously, she was a congressional reporter there. (Politico)
  • Amy Keller Laird is now editor-in-chief of Women’s Health. Previously, she was executive editor there. (Women’s Wear Daily)
  • Naomi Zeichner is now editor-in-chief of The Fader. Previously, she was music editor at BuzzFeed. (@nomizeichner)
  • Megan Sowder-Staley is now vice president for product strategy at Roll Call. Previously, she was director of product strategy there. Todd Ruger is a legal affairs staff writer for Roll Call. Previously, he covered legal issues for the National Law Journal. Rachel Oswald is a defense reporter for Roll Call. Previously, she was a reporter for Global Security Newswire. Connor O’Brien is a defense policy reporter for Roll Call. Previously, he was a congressional news reporter there. Gillian Roberts is now breaking news editor at Roll Call. Previously, she was a White House stringer at Bloomberg. Jamisha Ford is now special products editor at CQ Now. Previously, she was deputy editor at CQ Now. Bridget Bowman will cover the Capitol for Roll Call’s Hill Blotter blog. She was an intern there. Chris Williams is a multimedia and online developer for Roll Call. Previously, he was web director for Personal Selling Power. (Roll Call)

Job of the Day: Eagle-Tribune Publishing is looking for page designers. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Bloomberg Politics debuts trailer for new show ‘With All Due Respect’

Bloomberg Politics

Bloomberg Politics’ forthcoming show “With All Due Respect” aims to fuse “popular culture, the political world and TV,” according to a teaser trailer released Monday.

The trailer opens with clips of several prominent politicians (Barack Obama, Chris Christie and Hillary Clinton) prefacing statements with the phrase “with all due respect,” accompanied by a voiceover.

“In a world,” intones a stentorian, movie theater-ish voice, “where people say ‘with all due respect’ when that is not at all what they mean, comes a new show that fuses popular culture, the political world and TV.”

Clips from movies and TV shows, news programs and C-Span footage play throughout:

The show, which will be hosted by “Game Change” authors Mark Halperin and John Heilemann, is set to debut Oct. 6. Read more

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Clash over Abramson’s style may have figured in Politico editor’s resignation

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Rick Berke leaves Politico: The publication’s executive editor resigned Sunday, citing “an acceptance by the three of us that the dynamics were just not there for us to function seamlessly.” The other two people in that “three of us” formulation, John Harris and Jim VandeHei, tell staffers “We have very big plans for expanding POLITICO here and elsewhere and need in place a leadership team that shares our vision, ambitions and full faith.” (HuffPost) | Erik Wemple passes on word of an awkward “Politico University” workshop in May, after Berke’s former boss Jill Abramson was fired: “Berke got a bit off-topic, putting forth his opinion that Abramson was an inept and insensitive manager. Some female staffers objected to that characterization, and the session blew up in awkward polemics about the internal politics of a competing outlet.” (WP) | “Rick Berke does not capitalize “Politico” in his resignation message. That’s a strategic difference right there” (@johnmcquaid)
  2. Benny Johnson gets a second chance: The former BuzzFeed reporter, fired for plagiarism in July, will be social media director at National Review. “Benny made a terrible mistake,” National Review Editor Rich Lowry tells Mike Allen. “But he has owned up to it and learned from it.” (Politico) | “#FF @RichLowry” (@bennyjohnson) | “‘God and Man at #YOLO’” (@sissenberg)
  3. Wealthy owners sought for DFM papers: “Newspaper Guild-represented staff at major newspapers including the Denver Post, San Jose Mercury News and St. Paul Pioneer Press are publishing ads online and in print seeking local, community-minded buyers for their newsrooms.” (Newspaper Guild) | Do you know anyone who’d like to mix a little ink into their blue blood? Contact TNG-CWA President Bernie Lunzer (bernie@newsguild.org) or TNG-CWA Acting Secretary-Treasurer Sara Steffens (sara@newsguild.org)
  4. Ben Smith on the death of the newspaper “bundle”: “[T]here are signs that the unbundling may be followed by a rebundling. … And so editors like me are wrestling with two questions: can we put the bundle back together? And should we?” (The Guardian) | FREEKY FLASHBACK: “If anything, BuzzFeed, with its massive traffic and fat wallet, has reengineered the ‘bundle’ so it can actually add news coverage in an advertising climate that’s caused other publications to get really good at subtraction.” (Poynter)
  5. Why won’t Bloomberg report on itself? The news organization’s “decision to not write about Mr. Bloomberg’s return to his company, and Mr. Bloomberg’s decision to speak with a rival news organization, displeased a number of Bloomberg’s journalists,” Ravi Somaiya writes. “To retreat on a newsworthy story in deference to your owners is bad policy,” Ann Marie Lipinski tells him. (NYT)
  6. Remembering Steven Sotloff: About 1,000 people gathered in Pinecrest, Florida, to remember the slain journalist. Sotloff “went to places we only read about in the headlines, sought out people, became their voice,” Rabbi Terry Bookman said in a eulogy. “And what a beautiful voice it was.” (Miami Herald) | Clips from his work at Central Florida Future (Central Florida Future) | Related: David Carr on the “mastery of medium and message” Sotloff’s murderers show in their video. “ISIS seems to understand that the same forces that carried the Ice Bucket Challenge’s message of uplift — the desire to be part of something, to be in the know — can be used to spread fear and terror as well.” (NYT)
  7. Chuck Todd debuts as “Meet the Press” host: “It will take more than a former bouncer with awesome tats to save ‘Meet the Press,’” Manuel Roig-Franzia writes. “But in a genre that sometimes has the feel of a wax museum, it’s a start.” (WP) | The show “isn’t going to be turned around in six days or six weeks,” Todd tells Brian Stelter. (CNN)
  8. Why did The Plain Dealer pull three top reporters from courts beat? “The reason bandied about the Plain Dealer newsroom in the wake of the announcements is that the stories written by [Rachel] Dissell, [John] Caniglia, and [Jim] McCarty were generating some of the highest traffic online. Since these three reporters still work for the union-employed Plain Dealer, NEOMG and NEOMG boss Chris Quinn could not take credit for the Internet traffic. By replacing his award-winning journos, Quinn can now claim the clicks for future court stories.” (Cleveland Scene)
  9. Ferguson Fellowship funded: $40,319 was pledged by 8:19 a.m. Monday, two days before the deadline. Two people took the $5,000 package, which includes a lunch at the Ferguson McDonald’s with Ryan J. Reilly and Ferguson Fellow Mariah Stewart. (Beacon Reader)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Benny Johnson will be social media editor for National Review. Previously, he was viral politics editor at BuzzFeed. (Politico) | Joe Scarborough will be a contributor to “Meet the Press.” He is the host of “Morning Joe” on MSNBC. (The Hill) | Rebecca Adams is now a staff writer at The Huffington Post covering family and relationships. She was lifestyle editor there. (The Huffington Post) | Anna Orso is now a reporter and curator for Billy Penn. She was a reporter for the (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania) Patriot-News. (Billy Penn) | Shari Levine is now executive vice president of current production for Bravo Media. She was senior vice president of current production there. (NBC Universal) | Adam Bryant is now a deputy science editor at The New York Times. He is a business writer there. (Poynter) | Howard Mittman is now publisher of GQ. Previously, he was publisher of Wired. (Condé Nast) | Chris Mitchell is now publisher of Vanity Fair. Previously, he was publisher at GQ. (Condé Nast) | Daniella Diaz is a web producer at Politico. Previously, she was a staff writer at The Monitor. (Politico) | Job of the day: The Center for Public Integrity is looking for a fellow. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Jill Abramson would like a magazine job

mediawiremorningGood morning. We’re almost there. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Area man to appear on television: Chuck Todd will interview President Obama for his first episode of “Meet the Press” on Sunday. (Politico)
  2. HuffPost won’t talk about Jimmy Soni: HuffPost parent AOL was investigating allegations of sexual harrassment by its former managing editor, J.K. Trotter reports. (Gawker) | “Rumors have been swirling inside the company for the past couple of months about Soni’s alleged inappropriate behavior with female Huffington Post fellows.” (Capital)
  3. ONA bends to pressure on its Ferguson panel: “We did not intend to overlook great work at the local level,” Trevor Knoblich writes. “We began today looking for a local person to add to our session.” (ONA) | Earlier: “Why are no local outlets represented in ONA’s Ferguson keynote?” (Poynter) | Related: Kristen Hare is still curating her Twitter list of people reporting from Ferguson.
  4. L.A. Times reporter shared drafts of stories with CIA: Ken Dilanian tells Ken Silverstein he “shouldn’t have” sent stories to CIA spokespeople before he ran them, and he “wouldn’t do it now.” He’s now an AP reporter. AP spokesperson Paul Colford told Silverstein AP is “satisfied that any pre-publication exchanges that Ken had with the CIA before joining AP were in pursuit of accuracy in his reporting on intelligence matters,” and that “we do not coordinate with government agencies on the phrasing of material.” (The Intercept) | Remember quote approval? Jeremy W. Peters reported in 2012 about the practice. (NYT) Many news orgs distanced themselves from it. (Poynter) | Former Washington Post reporter Daniel de Vise got in hot water later that month when Texas Observer revealed he had shared drafts with sources. (Texas Observer) | Then Post Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli clamped down on the practice. (Poynter) | In August of that year, NYT reporter Mark Mazzetti sent an advance copy of a Maureen Dowd column to a CIA spokesperson. (Politico)
  5. Stock of Politico article on Glenn Greenwald drops: An intensely weird Politico Magazine piece that claims “Greenwald Inc. has already peaked,” offering evidence like this: “‘I think there’s a bit of Snowden fatigue out there right now,’ said former NSA director Michael Hayden.” (Politico) | The story “is terrible, in precisely seven ways.” (WP) | “So Glenn Greenwald, having been up—on the strength of Edward Snowden’s decision to trust him with a collection of leaked classified documentation of the NSA’s immense and all but unchecked mass surveillance program—is due to be down. Because the NSA has stopped spying on everyone, hasn’t it?” (Gawker) | Dylan Byers: “I’m of the opinion, and was of the opinion, that [Greenwald] peaked more than a year ago.” (Politico)
  6. Time Inc. chief hints at a plan: CEO Joe Ripp “said he is taking cues from National Geographic’s transformation from a sleepy not-for-profit print publication into a ‘multimedia powerhouse’ in cable television and online.” (Re/code) | Related: At the same conference, Jill Abramson said, “I would like to be working at the highest quality kind of magazine.” (Re/code) | “As she took the stage, seated across from her interviewer, Re/code cofounder Kara Swisher, some in the audience could see she was wearing a piece of statement jewelry: a necklace shaped to spell the word ‘pushy.’” (Capital)
  7. Why Mike came back to Bloomberg: “The goal of increasing the company’s visibility is not about satisfying the former mayor’s ego, Mr. Doctoroff and others say, but rather increasing the demand for terminals,” Jonathan Mahler writes. “The logic is that the more visible Bloomberg becomes, the more likely newsmakers will be to give its reporters news that moves markets.” (NYT) | “Mr. Bloomberg is returning to a more competitive marketplace than the one he left in 2002 and to increasingly strained relations with the financial institutions that make up the company’s core customer base.” (WSJ)
  8. Adieu, Twitpic: “Unfortunately we do not have the resources to fend off a large company like Twitter to maintain our mark which we believe whole heartedly is rightfully ours.” (Twitpic Blog)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The New York Daily News remembers Joan Rivers. (Courtesy Newseum)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin. Robert Lopez will be communications director for California State University, Los Angeles. Previously, he was an investigative reporter for the Los Angeles Times. (LA Observed) | Robin Sproul will be vice president of public affairs for ABC News. Previously, she was Washington bureau chief there. Jonathan Greenberger will be ABC’s Washington bureau chief. He is executive producer of “This Week.” (ABC News) | Rebecca Nelson will be a staff correspondent at the National Journal. Previously, she was an assistant editor at The Washingtonian. (Fishbowl DC) | Dennis Rodkin will run a nursery in California. Previously, he was a reporter at Crain’s Chicago Business. (Crain’s) | Michael Wright will be CEO of DreamWorks Studios. Previously, he was head of programming for TBS, TNT and Turner Classic Movies. (New York Times) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for an administrative correspondent in Austin, Texas. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Career Beat: Former NFL wide receiver Donte Stallworth joins HuffPost

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Michael Bloomberg will replace Daniel Doctoroff as chief executive officer of Bloomberg LP. Previously, Bloomberg was mayor of New York City. (New York Times)
  • Gina Sanders is now president of Condé Nast Global Development. She was president and CEO of Fairchild Fashion Media. (Condé Nast)
  • Brian Olsavsky will be chief financial officer for Amazon.com, Inc. He is the company’s vice president of finance. (Amazon)
  • Donte Stallworth is a politics fellow at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was a coaching intern with the Baltimore Ravens. Before that, he was an NFL wide receiver. (HuffPost Politics)
  • Chris Meighan is now design director of The Washington Post’s mobile initiative. Previously, he was The Post’s deputy design director. (The Washington Post)
  • Doris Truong will be weekend editor for The Washington Post’s universal desk. She is the homepage editor for The Post. (The Washington Post)
  • Joe Vardon will cover LeBron James for the Northeast Ohio Media Group. He was a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch. (Romenesko)
  • Tom Gara will be deputy editor for BuzzFeed Business. He is the corporate news editor for The Wall Street Journal. (Recode)
  • David Gehring will be vice president of partnerships for Guardian News & Media. He was the head of global alliances and strategic partnerships for Google. (Release)

Job of the day: The Dallas Morning News is looking for a photographer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Bloomberg makes exception to policy about employees who left

mediawiremorningGood morning after a day of never-ending media news. Here are at least 10 media stories.

  1. Hizzoner is back: Mike Bloomberg will return to run Bloomberg L.P., Andrew Ross Sorkin reports. Current Bloomberg honcho Daniel L. Doctoroff will depart by the end of the year. “If it was up to me, he would have stayed,” Bloomberg tells Sorkin. (NYT) | “Wait I thought when you leave Bloomberg you can’t ever come back?” (@kleinmatic) | Some context for that jape. (Inc.) | “With great pride and gratitude I’ll be turning the @Bloomberg reins back over to @MikeBloomberg at year’s end.” (@dandoctoroff) | Doctoroff explains why he’s leaving: “I have always viewed myself as Mike’s steward at the company. It is and has always been his company, and given his renewed interest, it is natural for him to reassume leadership of the company.” (Bloomberg) | The company “is facing competition from the financial firms that are its clients in areas like messaging.” (WSJ)
  2. USA Today lays off staff: Between 60 and 70 people lost their jobs yesterday. About half those cuts hit the newsroom. People I spoke with described seeing reporters pack up boxes and leave. One person told me she’d been dismissed in a five-minute phone call that stressed her layoff was a business decision. (Poynter) | Film critic Scott Bowles‘ mother canceled her subscription after her son got laid off. (@abeaujon)
  3. Donte Stallworth will cover national security for HuffPost: “There’s been a national security wonk lurking underneath Donte’s helmet for quite some time, as anyone who follows him on Twitter knows,” HuffPost’s Amanda Terkel says in a press release. | Gail Sullivan: “It’s true: Stallworth’s resume doesn’t look much like the average journalist’s. But his Twitter feed sure does.” (WP) | “[I]t turns out Stallworth has a 9/11 truther past.” (The Daily Caller)
  4. 20 Canadian newspapers will close: Transcontinental was not able to find buyers for most of the Quebec weeklies. The Canadian government ordered the company to sell 33 newspapers after it bought 74 newspapers from Sun Media Corp. About 80 people will lose their jobs. (Canadian Press/HuffPost Canada)
  5. New York Daily News will no longer use the term “Redskins” when writing about the D.C. football team: “Here’s a simple test of whether Redskin passes muster: Would you use the term in referring to Native Americans in anything other than a derogatory way?” The paper has also designed a new burgundy-and-gold logo to run in place of the Skins’ actual logo. (NYDN) | The Washington Post’s editorial board made a similar decision recently, but the newsroom will continue to use the name. (WP) | “Yeah, because the Washington Post editorial page is always writing about Redskins….” (@jackshafer) | My list of journalists and outlets that spurn the term. (Poynter) | Related: Web traffic from outside New York City is way, way up at the Daily News since it relaunched its website. (Digiday)
  6. Vice attracts more investment: A&E and Technology Crossover Ventures have each put $250 million into the company, which is now valued at $2.5 billion. (The Guardian) | Vice CEO Shane Smith in February: “Woodward and Bernstein are now the old men, but once they were the punks.” (Poynter)
  7. Social media companies kept video of Steven Sotloff’s execution from spreading: “‘It’s been very interesting, with this second beheading, how very little of those images have been passed around,’ said Family Online Safety Institute CEO Stephen Balkam, who serves on Facebook’s safety advisory board. ‘It’s very difficult to find them unless you know of some darker places on the web.’” (AP) | Margaret Sullivan on NYT’s use of image from video: “not using anything at all from this despicable video would have been even better.” (NYT)
  8. New York City has 309 newsstands left: Sales of lottery tickets and sundries keep most of those going. “Newsstands that used to sell 1,000 papers a day now sell 100,” NYC Newsstand Operators Association President Robert Bookman tells Gary M. Stern. (NYO)
  9. Ferguson is not over: The Justice Department “will launch a broad civil rights investigation into the Ferguson, Mo., Police Department.” (WP) | AN ABSOLUTE MUST-READ: Radley Balko on how tiny St. Louis-area towns use their justice systems to soak poor people. If you want to understand some of the context of the unrest that followed Mike Brown’s death, you won’t want to miss this story. (WP)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Michael Bloomberg will replace Daniel Doctoroff as chief executive officer of Bloomberg LP. Previously, Bloomberg was mayor of New York City. (New York Times) | Gina Sanders is now president of Condé Nast Global Development. She was president and CEO of Fairchild Fashion Media. (Condé Nast) | Brian Olsavsky will be chief financial officer for Amazon.com, Inc. He is the company’s vice president of finance. (Amazon) | Donte Stallworth is a politics fellow at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was a coaching intern with the Baltimore Ravens (HuffPost Politics) | Chris Meighan is now design director of The Washington Post’s mobile initiative. Previously, he was The Post’s deputy design director. (The Washington Post) | Doris Truong will be weekend editor for The Washington Post’s universal desk. She is the homepage editor for The Post. (The Washington Post) | Joe Vardon will cover LeBron James for the Northeast Ohio Media Group. He was a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch. (Romenesko) | Tom Gara will be deputy editor for BuzzFeed Business. He is the corporate news editor for The Wall Street Journal. (Recode) | David Gehring will be vice president of partnerships for Guardian News & Media. He was the head of global alliances and strategic partnerships for Google. (Release) | Job of the day: The Dallas Morning News is looking for a photographer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Michael Bloomberg returns to his media empire

New York Times

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is returning to run Bloomberg LP, a financial data and media company, according to a report in the New York Times.

Chief Executive Dan Doctoroff will step down at the end of the year to make room for Bloomberg.

Bloomberg’s term as mayor ended eight months ago and he was expected to dedicate his energy to philanthropic issues, specifically gun control. But he apparently couldn’t stay away from the company he founded, coming in for a few meetings and then staying for longer, according to the Times article. Eventually, he wanted to call the shots at the company that he owns 88 percent of and Doctoroff agreed to step aside. Read more

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Wiegel, Bazelon leave Slate

Huffington Post | Capital | Slate

Emily Bazelon and Dave Weigel will leave Slate, continuing a shakeup that began after former editor David Plotz stepped down as top editor in July.

Bazelon, a senior editor for Slate since 2005, will be a staff writer for New York Times Magazine, where she has been a contributor, according to a release from The Times.

In a statement, New York Times Magazine editor Jake Silverstein said he was “giddy” about the hire.

Weigel will join Bloomberg’s as-yet unnamed politics vertical, Michael Calderone reports for The Huffington Post.

Wiegel wrote about his departure from Slate, saying that his move was inspired by his appreciation for the team at Bloomberg:

This is still my favorite magazine and I’m only leaving it because Bloomberg’s putting together — I will try to avoid corporate-speak — an ambitious political magazine run by the sort of geniuses who made Bloomberg Businessweek into a great print mag, and New York’s political coverage a daily must-read.

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