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Boston Marathon

NEWS

At the marathon, AP's Bill Kole made lousy time and great tweets

When he runs, Bill Kole usually pulls back from what's happening around him and focuses on his pace. On Monday, he did the opposite for the Boston Marathon. "I needed to think about what was going on with the many souls around me," he said in a phone interview with Poynter. Kole, who's the New England bureau chief for the Associated Press, stopped at each mile to tweet. In each of those tweets was a small story, a scene, a few seconds of what was happening at the Boston Marathon one year after the bombings that killed three people and left more than 260 injured. Mile 1: Huge choruses of "Hell, yeah, we're back!" from the crowd. #26Tweets2Boston — Bill Kole (@billkole) April 21, 2014 Mile 19: Just when I was about to complain about a blister, I passed a man with a carbon fiber blade. There are no words. #26Tweets2Boston — Bill Kole (@billkole) April 21, 2014 Finish: Everyone's screaming on Boylston Street. For all the right reasons. 36,000 sweaty, tearful, exuberant reasons. #26Tweets2Boston — Bill Kole (@billkole) April 21, 2014 Read More
NEWS

Boston Magazine publishes new photos of Tsarnaev arrest in response to Rolling Stone cover

Boston Magazine | Boston Globe | CNN Boston Magazine released dramatic photos of alleged Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev Thursday night after state police tactical photographer Sergeant Sean P. Murphy gave them to the magazine. Murphy did so in response to Rolling Stone's controversial cover of Tsarnaev, which some say gave him rockstar treatment. Murphy, who distributed photos without permission from Massachusetts State Police, told Boston Magazine the photos show “the real Boston bomber. Not someone fluffed and buffed for the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.” He called the cover an "insult" to anyone who has worn a uniform and to those who have lost a loved one in the line of duty: As a professional law-enforcement officer of 25 years, I believe that the image that was portrayed by Rolling Stone magazine was an insult to any person who has every worn a uniform of any color or any police organization or military branch, and the family members who have ever lost a loved one serving in the line of duty. The truth is that glamorizing the face of terror is not just insulting to the family members of those killed in the line of duty, it also could be an incentive to those who may be unstable to do something to get their face on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. Read More
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