Articles about "BuzzFeed"


Games

Games are serious business at news organizations

Later this month, Gannett plans to debut a page on USA Today’s website with 70 free-to-play games.

The page will include brain training and arcade-style games, said John Geddes, the company’s first director of gaming, entertainment, and events.

“We feel that expanding our portfolio to include additional popular games such as solitaire, mahjong, and brain teasers is a huge opportunity to not only provide something new for that existing audience but for us to also attract waves of new users,” Geddes said.

Gannett is merely the latest media company to expand its games offerings. Several news organizations have acknowledged the increasing importance of games, whether for storytelling or diversion:

  • The Washington Post has pulled together an in-house team to develop a platform that will allow the newsroom to easily create quizzes, leaderboards and surveys, said Emilio Garcia-Ruiz, the paper’s managing editor for digital.
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Brian Kilmeade

‘Fox & Friends’: ‘We are not, we were not’ taking domestic violence lightly

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Program may feature fewer domestic violence jokes: “Fox & Friends” co-hosts Brian Kilmeade and Steve Doocy had a real laff-fest over a video, released by TMZ, that showed the football player battering his then fiancée in an elevator. “I think the message is, take the stairs,” Kilmeade quipped. The program will address the remarks today. (WP) | That address in full:

    Peter King writes about the “lapse in reporting on my part” that led to him writing NFL officials had previously seen the Rice tape. “No one from the league has ever knocked down my report to me, and so I was surprised to see the claim today that league officials have not seen the tape.” (SI) | “At the time, it was important for the NFL to establish that it was taking great pains to investigate the incident.” (Deadspin) | Sally Jenkins: “It simply defies belief that league and team officials couldn’t have seen it if they wanted to.” (WP) | AP has seen a longer version of the video.

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Career Beat: Fired BuzzFeed editor Benny Johnson joins National Review

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Benny Johnson will be social media editor for National Review. Previously, he was viral politics editor at BuzzFeed. (Politico)
  • Joe Scarborough will be a contributor to “Meet the Press.” He is the host of “Morning Joe” on MSNBC. (The Hill)
  • Shari Levine is now executive vice president of current production for Bravo Media. She was senior vice president of current production there. (NBC Universal)
  • Adam Bryant is now a deputy science editor at The New York Times. He is a business writer there. (Poynter)
  • Howard Mittman is now publisher of GQ. Previously, he was publisher of Wired. (Condé Nast)
  • Chris Mitchell is now publisher of Vanity Fair.
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politico-logo

Clash over Abramson’s style may have figured in Politico editor’s resignation

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Rick Berke leaves Politico: The publication’s executive editor resigned Sunday, citing “an acceptance by the three of us that the dynamics were just not there for us to function seamlessly.” The other two people in that “three of us” formulation, John Harris and Jim VandeHei, tell staffers “We have very big plans for expanding POLITICO here and elsewhere and need in place a leadership team that shares our vision, ambitions and full faith.” (HuffPost) | Erik Wemple passes on word of an awkward “Politico University” workshop in May, after Berke’s former boss Jill Abramson was fired: “Berke got a bit off-topic, putting forth his opinion that Abramson was an inept and insensitive manager. Some female staffers objected to that characterization, and the session blew up in awkward polemics about the internal politics of a competing outlet.” (WP) | “Rick Berke does not capitalize “Politico” in his resignation message.
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Diane Sawyer

After Sawyer’s final ABC World News broadcast, all 3 nightly anchors are now white men

Yo. Here are some media stories.

  1. Is the Yo app ridiculous or revolutionary? That’s the question Cory Blair asks. It’s definitely the former, but it has potential to be the latter, especially now that users can send links and not just notifications with no content. Robert Hernandez has an interesting idea for what news organizations like The Washington Post could use Yo for: “whenever an unarmed person dies at the hands of the police, or every time somebody is killed with a gun.” (American Journalism Review)
  2. Diane Sawyer anchors her final ABC World News broadcast: But she’s staying with the network. David Muir is her successor. “Now, all three nightly news anchors are once again white men,” Brian Stelter notes. (CNN)
  3. NPR’s Michel Martin heads to Ferguson: The former “Tell Me More” host will lead a town hall meeting today.
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Career Beat: BuzzFeed names product lead for news app

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Noah Chestnut will be the lead developer for BuzzFeed’s news app. He’s currently director of labs at The New Republic. (Capital)
  • Rob Mennie is now senior vice president of Gannett Broadcasting and general manager for WTLV/WJXX in Jacksonville, Florida. Previously, he was senior vice president of news for Gannett Broadcasting. (Gannett)
  • Ben Walsh will be a business reporter at The Huffington Post. He’s currently a writer for Reuters. (‏@BenDWalsh)
  • Kimberly Leonard will be a healthcare reporter for U.S. News and World Report. Previously, she was a health producer there. (@leonardkl)
  • Larry Abramson is now dean of the journalism school at the University of Montana. Previously, he was a correspondent for National Public Radio.
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Let's Get Weird: A BuzzFeed Event sponsored by The CW

BuzzFeed’s Ben Smith: ‘We didn’t fully think through’ the removal of old posts

Several months ago, roughly half a dozen early BuzzFeed writers were told to go back through their pre-2012 work and decide what they wanted to save. Anything they didn’t want to keep or update should be removed from the site, they were told.

“Go through your stuff and save what you care about,” is how BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith summarizes the direction.

The result was that thousands of posts were removed from BuzzFeed, without any notice or disclosure. The removal of content was revealed by Gawker’s J.K. Trotter in two posts, the most recent of which outlined the previously unknown scale of the cull.

Smith was off in the woods on vacation when Trotter’s latest piece was published last week. This morning I spoke to him by phone, and he said BuzzFeed did not handle the purge of old content as well as it should have.… Read more

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keyboard and hand

Journalists fight directive to write more stories

Good morning. You have earned the weekend before you. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. BuzzFeeed honcho talks about deleted posts: “[I]f you look at that era of BuzzFeed through the lens of newspaper or magazine journalism, you would say [deleting those posts] was a strange decision,” Jonah Peretti tells Will Oremus. “We just didn’t and don’t look at that period of BuzzFeed as being a journalistic enterprise.” (Slate) | But the posts disappeared this year, when BuzzFeed is a journalistic enterprise. Amy Rose Spiegel‘s February 2013 post “What’s the Deal With Jazz” reappeared after Oremus pointed out it had vanished, too. Editor’s note: “This post has been reinstated after it was brought to our attention that the author deleted it, against our editorial standards.” (Gawker) | Hot J.K.
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simone-camilli

AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden.
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If you must unpublish, here’s how to maintain credibility

Gawker

Gawker notes that BuzzFeed has unpublished more than 4,000 articles recently, disappearing posts on the 8-year-old company’s website. Editors at news websites usually take articles down with great reluctance, because doing so undermines public confidence in your newsroom’s work. Why would anyone trust what you say today if you routinely take down pages that you can no longer stand behind?

RELATED: Fairness and credibility guidelines for unpublishing online content

Still, there are rare occasions when taking down a post is the best option. Here are some best practices:

  • Keep a blank page up, rather than making the entire URL disappear or redirecting to a homepage without note.
  • Leave the tags and searchable information, so folks can find what’s left behind and know for certain the information is no longer valid.
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