Articles about "Chicago Sun-Times"


N.Y. tabs met in secret lovenest

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories, then let’s get to the weekend.

  1. A New York Post/New York Daily News collaboration? Joe Pompeo reports the rival papers had unsuccessful discussions about “a number of potential business deals that would have made unlikely bedfellows of enemy combatants.” “Many deal points were on the table,” a source tells him. Another source tells Pompeo talks about a digital-only Daily News are “not about if, they’re about when.” (Capital)
  2. Earnings: Broadcast ad revenues way up, print ad revenues down nearly 8 percent at Meredith. (MediaPost) | McClatchy had “a rocky third quarter,” plus what it called “important events that have sealed our financial flexibility” — some substantial assets sales. “An unfriendly commentator might describe those ‘events’ as a yard sale,” Rick Edmonds writes. (Poynter)
  3. Some less-than-worshipful takes on the Dave McKinney affair: His now-former Sun-Times colleague Neil Steinberg writes: “I sincerely believe that had McKinney managed to just step around this mess and gone back to doing his job, an important life skill in journalism, instead of pouring gasoline over himself, and the paper, and striking a match, the whole thing would be over by now and he’d be back to kicking [Illinois gubernatorial candidate Bruce] Rauner’s ass, which is what this is supposedly all about.” (Every goddamn day) | Erik Wemple on the “monster ethical issue” underneath all this: “Either the Sun-Times should have bumped McKinney from the race early on, or it should have run disclaimers on his stories.” (WP)
  4. AMC buys half of BBC America: The deal may help the BBC World News channel get on U.S. cable and satellite systems, Brian Stelter reports. (CNN)
  5. Guardian’s lawyer honored: The National LGBT Bar Association will honor Gill Phillips, who runs editorial legal services at Guardian News & Media Limited. The Guardian’s Edward Snowden stories were “one of many challenges the openly lesbian Phillips has faced during her tenure at the paper, which has also included breaking the phone-hacking story, The Trafigura Super Injunction Saga and the Leveson Inquiry.” (PinkNews)
  6. The Queen sent a tweet: “It is a pleasure to open the Information Age exhibition today at the @ScienceMuseum and I hope people will enjoy visiting. Elizabeth R.” (@BritishMonarchy) | Other tweets by royals. (Twitter UK) | One used an iPad: “Here’s a photo of the man who actually typed the tweet and prepared the iPad for the Queen.” (Business Insider)
  7. National Report defends bogus news reports: “We like to think we are doing a public service by introducing readers to misinformation,” National Report publisher Allen Montgomery (whose name is also fake, but let’s move on) says. Craig Silverman: “They may say this is an educational effort, but all the education has come from the other people debunking their stuff.” (Digiday)
  8. “Sometimes the size is so overwhelming, it’s hard to find a picture”: NYT photographer Ozier Muhammad takes Deborah Acosta with him on assignment as he tries to get (and transmit) photos from last month’s People’s Climate March. He finally gets an image through by hitting a Starbucks and using its WiFi. (NYT)
  9. Front page of the day, not curated by Kristen Hare: A great photo of yesterday’s solar eclipse from The Plain Dealer’s John Kuntz, with a solid headline: “Moon takes a spectacular bite out of the sun.” (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    plain-dealer-10242014  

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Callie Schweitzer has been named editorial director of audience strategy for Time Magazine and Time Inc. Previously, she was director of digital innovation at Time magazine. (Poynter) | Peter Lattman will be deputy business editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was media editor there. (The New York Times) | Paul Greenberg is chief executive officer at Nylon Media. Previously, he was CEO of CollegeHumor.com. (prnewswire.com) | Stefano Fusaro is now a sports anchor for WTVJ in Miami. Previously, he was sports director at KXLN in Houston. (TV Spy) | Roxane Gay is a columnist at Guardian U.S. She is the author of “An Untamed State” and “Bad Feminist”. Jeb Lund is a columnist at Guardian U.S. He has written for Rolling Stone, GQ and The New Republic. Trevor Timm is a columnist at Guardian U.S. He is executive director of the Freedom of the Press Foundation. Steven Thrasher is a columnist at Guardian U.S. He is a contributing editor at BuzzFeed. Jess Zimmerman is a columnist at Guardian U.S. She is a technology essayist. (Email) | Job of the day: Euclid Media Group is looking for an editor-in-chief for the San Antonio Current. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Could Sun-Times reporter’s resignation affect governor’s race?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Will Sun-Times reporter’s resignation shake Illinois governor’s race? Sun-Times Springfield bureau chief Dave McKinney quit publicly yesterday, saying the paper suspended him after Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner — a former investor in the Sun-Times’ parent company — tried to get a story squashed because he’s married to a Democratic consultant. (Dave McKinney’s blog) | Sun-Times EIC Jim Kirk responds: “I call the shots. While I’ve been here, our ownership and management have never quashed a story and they have always respected the journalistic integrity of this paper.” (Poynter) | To make this story even more gothic, the Sun-Times endorsed Rauner last Friday, breaking a policy it set in early 2012. | “But, at a minimum, the ongoing story certainly will give the [campaign of Rauner's Democratic opponent, Gov. Pat Quinn] an enormous platform to charge that Mr. Rauner is against not just poor people but freedom of the press,” Greg Hinz writes. (Crain’s Chicago Business)
  2. OK, it’s time to pay attention to Gamergate: The online movement, which opposes…something “has declared another victory after software maker Adobe implicitly condemned a recent series of tweets from Gawker writer Sam Biddle that made fun of the Gamergate movement.” (Re/code) | Gawker Editor-in-Chief Max Read writes: “I’ve been told that we’ve lost thousands of dollars already, and could potentially lose thousands more, if not millions.” Read says he feels like “went to sleep in the regular world and woke up in an insane new one where ‘bullying’ is something that it’s possible to be seriously and sincerely ‘for.’” Nevertheless, brands like Intel and Adobe have proven themselves “willing to distance themselves from independent publishers over the spurious claims of a limited but dedicated group of misogynists and trolls.” (Gawker) | “Adobe walks into Gamergate, staggers around confusedly” (Boing Boing)
  3. A little bit more on Ben Bradlee: He struggled with issues of race and sex in the newsroom. (Maynard Institute) | Rachel Jones remembers how Bradlee pushed her to take a Washington Post internship and basically willed her into employment as a journalist. “We have GOT to make an effort to include voices besides our own in this goddamned newspaper,” she remembers him saying. (LinkedIn) | “If there was one happy facet of the [Janet] Cooke affair, it was that the mistake of one young reporter cleared the way for the success of another,” Jon Campbell writes: The Village Voice got its first Pulitzer after the Post returned Cooke’s prize, for Teresa Carpenter‘s story about Dorothy Stratten, “Death of a Playmate.” (The Village Voice) | Bradlee’s tenure at the Post should be viewed in relation to his slimly acknowledged competition with Jim Bellows at the Washington Star. “Bellows might have gotten a bigger send off when he died at the age of 86 in 2009 had Bradlee had preceded him in death,” Jack Shafer writes. “But, no, Bradlee was the last giant standing, and according to the rules of the game, he who dies last gets the biggest funeral pyre. Bellows would understand completely.” (Reuters) | Media myths creep into Bradlee obits. (Media Myth Alert)
  4. Anderson Cooper swats reporter who asked for selfie with him: Vandon Gene requested a photo with the CNN anchor at the site where a Canadian soldier was killed yesterday. (The Blaze) | “I can’t believe any station employs you, and if you want to be a journalist, learn how to behave when covering a story.” (@andersoncooper)
  5. NYT may have lots of takers for buyouts: Guild rep Grant Glickson tells Keith J. Kelly “There were over 300 requests,” by members to look at the company’s severance packages. (NYP) | The company is looking to shed 100 jobs. (Poynter) | “‘Some people who were undecided about leaving, or just curious, didn’t want to request the paperwork because they worried (correctly or not) that it would put targets on their backs,’ Times higher education reporter Richard Pérez-Peña, a Guild vice chair, wrote Thursday in a post on Facebook. ‘To protect those people, some of my colleagues suggested that EVERYONE should ask for it. Suddenly, the number soared, but most of those people have no intention of leaving.’” (Capital)
  6. Why did Politico Magazine let a BP PR exec write a story about pollution in the Gulf? Geoff Morrell‘s story, “No, BP Didn’t Ruin the Gulf,” is “Free native advertising,” Erik Wemple writes. (WP) | “As of Wednesday afternoon, Morrell’s piece is now filed to the ‘Opinion’ section of Politico Magazine. The story was earlier filed to ‘Environment’ and not clearly marked as an Opinion piece.” (Newsweek)
  7. Roman Mars’ advice for indie radio producers: “The most fundamental thing is own your work.” (Capital)
  8. A road trip in North Korea: Eric Talmadge took a monitored trip through the Hermit Kingdom: “At the best hotels in cities such as Hamhung, Samjiyon and Chongjin, the places where we stayed as our journey proceeded through the hinterlands, the rooms, replete with doilies and cushy velvet-covered chairs, were clean, the decor retro Soviet and the food plentiful. But the vintage TVs, when they worked, offered only one channel.” (AP)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: “Attacked,” on the front of the Globe and Mail. (More Canadian front pages here.)

    globeandmail-10232014  

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Rachel Zarrell is now news editor at BuzzFeed News. Previously, she was a weekend editor there. (‏@rachelzarrell) | Ben Calhoun is now director of content and programming at WBEZ in Chicago. Previously, he was a producer for “This American Life.” (Robert Feder) | Ada Guerin is now creative director at The Wrap. Previously, she was design director and associate art director at The Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap) | Jose Zamora is now on the board of directors of the Online News Association. He is director of strategic communications at Univision Network. (ONA) | Carla Zanoni will be global audience development director at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was director of social media and engagement at DNAinfo.com. (Carla Zanoni) | Tara Adiseshan is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post. Previously, she worked on search design at Autodesk and conducted research focused on harvesting rainwater in India. Juan Elosua is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at La Nacion. He is a telecommunications engineer and data journalist. Livia Labate is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at NPR. Previously, she led Marriott’s digital standards and practices group. Linda Sandvik is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The Guardian. Previously, she worked in local government. Julia Smith is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at the Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, she was a designer and developer on news sites and mobile applications. Francis Tseng is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post He currently teaches at the New School’s Design + Journalism program. (dansinker.com) | Jon Garinn is now medical editor of the radiology administration department at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Previously, he was managing editor of CURE Magazine. (email) | Job of the day: Politico is looking for a lobbying reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Reporter quits Sun-Times, cites ‘chilling effect in the newsroom’

Dave McKinney’s blog | Crain’s Chicago Business

Chicago Sun-Times reporter Dave McKinney has resigned from the newspaper, saying, “I’m convinced this newspaper no longer has the backs of reporters like me” in a letter to Michael Ferro, chairman of Sun-Times owner Wrapports LLC.

McKinney was the paper’s Springfield bureau chief and was suspended for five days last week after a Republican gubernatorial candidate, Bruce Rauner, complained about a story on which he co-bylined, because he’s married to a Democratic consultant.

In his post, McKinney calls that suspension “a kind of house arrest that lasted almost a week” and says “It was pure hell.” The Sun-Times later broke with its recent tradition of not endorsing candidates and endorsed Rauner, who is a former investor in Wrapports.

“Readers of the Sun-Times need to be able to trust the paper,” McKinney writes. He continues:

They need to know a wall exists between owners and the newsroom to preserve the integrity of what is published. A breach in that wall exists at the Sun-Times.

It’s had a chilling effect in the newsroom. While I don’t speak for my colleagues, I’m aware that many share my concern.

“It is with reluctance that I accept Dave McKinney’s resignation,” Sun-Times Editor-in-Chief Jim Kirk said in an email to Poynter. He continued:

As recently as this Monday on our Op/Ed page, I stated that Dave is among the best in our profession. I meant it then and I mean it now. The pause we took last week was to ensure there were no conflicts of interest and was taken simply to protect Dave McKinney, the Sun Times and its readers as we were under attack in a heated political campaign. We came to the right result, found the political attacks against us to be false and we stand by our reporting, our journalists and this great newspaper.

I disagree with Dave’s questioning the integrity of this newspaper and my role as editor and publisher. I call the shots. While I’ve been here, our ownership and management have never quashed a story and they have always respected the journalistic integrity of this paper.

Read more
Tools:
1 Comment

Tribune Publishing will reportedly buy Sun-Times’ suburban papers

Robert Feder

Tribune Publishing will buy 38 suburban papers owned by Chicago Sun-Times parent Wrapports LLC, Robert Feder reports.

“We do not comment on speculation,” Matthew Hutchison, a spokesperson for Tribune Publishing, told Poynter.

Tribune Publishing CEO Jack Griffin said in July that purchasing “smaller newspapers in or near his existing markets” would be part of the recently spun-off company’s strategy. Since the year began, Tribune’s Baltimore Sun Media Group bought the Baltimore City Paper as well as two other Maryland papers, The Capital in Annapolis and the Carroll County Times.

Last year Wrapports launched a hyperlocal service called Aggrego, which it said at the time could provide content that would back in to the Sun-Times Media Group’s papers. The Sun-Times has not replied for a request for comment about the sale report and what that might mean for Aggrego. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Sun-Times, attacked by both sides in governor’s race, defends coverage

Chicago Sun-Times | Crain’s Chicago Business

Bruce Rauner, a candidate for governor in Illinois, tried to squelch a critical Sun-Times story, Editor-in-Chief and Publisher Jim Kirk writes. The Sun-Times also endorsed Rauner, who used to be an investor in the Sun-Times’ ownership group. That move brought criticism from Rauner’s opponent, Gov. Pat Quinn.

“Those former ties mean nothing when it comes to the Sun-Times’ ability and determination to report on him and his campaign fairly and accurately,” Kirk writes, saying the paper “has been fearless in its reporting.”

The paper’s endorsement of Rauner was its first since it announced in 2012 that it would no longer make endorsements.

Sun-Times reporter Dave McKinney co-bylined on the story that angered Rauner, which reported on a lawsuit that claimed he’d threatened Christine Kirk, an executive at another company who is no relation to Jim Kirk. “There’s no ‘there’ there,” Rauner told the Sun-Times.

McKinney has hired an attorney “to investigate whether the campaign of Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner tried to interfere with his employment,” Lynne Marek reports in Crain’s Chicago Business. Rauner, a Republican, complained to the Sun-Times that McKinney is married to a Democratic consultant. “Recently, Mr. McKinney was inexplicably absent from his statehouse beat for five days despite one of the hottest gubernatorial races in recent memory,” Marek writes.

Kirk tells Marek that “Out of an abundance of caution, we did review this matter and we are convinced Dave’s wife, Ann Liston, receives no financial benefit from any Illinois political campaign because of the extraordinary steps they’ve taken to establish business safeguards.”

McKinney “has been and remains our Springfield bureau chief for all the right reasons: because he continues to do great work covering both sides of the aisle,” Kirk writes in his editorial. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Janelle Nanos is editor of Beta Boston

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Holly Gauntt is now news director for KDVR/KWGN in Denver. Previously, she was news director for KOMO in Seattle. Sarah Garza is interim news director for KOMO. Previously, she was assistant news director there. Nick McDermott is now executive producer at KTVA in Anchorage, Alaska. He has been a producer there. James Doughty is now communications director for a San Antonio city councilman. Previously, he was a reporter for KENS in San Antonio. (Rick Geevers)
  • Stacy-Marie Ishmael will head up editorial operations for BuzzFeed’s news app. Previously, she was vice president of communities at the Financial Times. (Nieman Lab)
  • Lindsey Bahr is now a film writer for The Associated Press. Previously, she was a correspondent for Entertainment Weekly. (AP)
  • Janelle Nanos is now editor of Beta Boston. Previously, she was a senior editor at Boston Magazine. (Muck Rack)
  • Matthew Schnipper is now a senior editor at GQ. Previously, he was editor-in-chief at Fader. (email)
  • Terry Savage is now a contributor at Tribune Content Agency. Previously, she was a columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times. (Robert Feder)

Job of the day: the AP is looking for a news research manager in New York. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Truth&Trust

Crime coverage in Chicago may be too good

Chicago is widely known as “Chiraq” or the “murder capital” even though its murder rate is much lower than in past years and in many other cities. Ironically this may be a function of local media’s attempts to do a better job reporting on homicides and crime

There was a time when reporters just didn’t cover many crime – or other — stories in the city’s low income, Black and Latino neighborhoods, noted veteran reporters at Poynter’s “Truth & Trust in the 21st Century” forum in Chicago Thursday. Now the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, DNAinfo and other media outlets make it a point to cover every murder in the city. But that means a lot of negative coverage about the city’s South and West sides, even as there are still relatively few other stories being reported on in these neighborhoods.

TruthTrust

When you have 10 crime stories for every uplifting story like the Jackie Robinson West Little League team, noted DNAinfo reporter Darryl Holliday, “that’s not a good ratio.” “It says that’s all that’s happening, when that’s not the case,” continued Holliday, who is also co-founder of The Illustrated Press, which does journalism through comics.

But there are not necessarily bright lines between “good” and “bad” stories, countered author Alex Kotlowitz, pointing to the “This American Life” documentary on Chicago’s Harper High as an example.

The “centrifugal force of journalism,” as Kotlowitz described it, is to “understand why kids make the decisions they make … to understand what pushes and pulls people.”

Asiaha Butler  (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

Asiaha Butler (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

But panelist Asiaha Butler told Kotlowitz she was unable to listen the Harper High documentary all the way through, since she felt it portrayed an unrealistically negative and “dramatic” view of the neighborhood where she has lived most of her life and leads the Residents Association of Greater Englewood (R.A.G.E.). She said the many untold stories in Englewood include the role of grandparents and great grandparents and the strong intergenerational structure that underpins the neighborhood.

“I’m not dodging bullets all the time,” said Butler, who with R.A.G.E. airs news on a website and a public access TV program. “You tell your own narrative, you don’t wait until the media comes.”

Like Butler, audience members at the Truth & Trust event implored reporters to do more to find and tell a wider range of stories.

“There are people who help people take out their garbage, who clean up the community … who help elders cross the street,” said Rondayle Sanders, a fifth-grader at the Bradwell School of Excellence whose class wrote an op-ed published in The Chicago Tribune presenting a fuller view of their neighborhood. “We want you to know more positive things about the South Side.”

When Sanders asked for advice in reporting, Butler suggested he start at his school “talking to the janitor, the lunch lady, hear their stories and highlight them.

In some ways it should be easier than ever for journalists to find and report a wide range of stories in different neighborhoods, since social media and new media have turned journalism from a specialized profession into an act practiced by the masses, as Kelly McBride, Poynter’s vice president of academic programs, put it.

McBride noted that these days rather than acting as gatekeepers of information and finding stories on their own, mainstream journalists are more often picking up on the stories being reported in blogs, community outlets and social media, “sorting through and magnifying” them.

But the financial crisis and budget cuts that have rocked the journalism world mean that even reporters with the best intentions struggle to get the time and space to tell the rich, multi-layered stories that do justice to a neighborhood.

“There’s no lack of these really great groups,” said Holliday. “But there are only so many journalists who can only do so many things.”

Linda Lutton (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

Linda Lutton (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

Kotlowitz noted that WBEZ reporter Linda Lutton, who was in the audience, was lucky to get substantial time to work on the Harper High story, a luxury relatively few full-time journalists are granted. Meanwhile from the audience veteran reporter Sally Duros pointed out that “good news stories are not news” or are viewed as “P.R.” by many.

Panelist Lolly Bowean, a Chicago Tribune reporter, noted that media outlets are financially and otherwise obligated to cover stories that draw readership and hence revenue. She said people often complain about the paper’s extensive coverage of rapper Chief Keef, but those are the stories that draw high numbers of views and comments.

“There has to be an appetite from the audience, from the public saying we need these stories,” said Bowean. “If there is no one paying 50 cents for that paper or going online to get it, then there is no us!”

Meanwhile panelists and audience members stressed that even as technology opens up possibilities for new and innovative ways to tell stories, there is still a crucial role for old-fashioned watchdog, accountability journalism. Reporters noted that police officers are often reticent with information about cases, and that in Chicago only about a quarter of murders are ever officially solved. The “triangle” of relationships between police, community members and journalists — as audience member David Schaper of NPR put it — is typically tense and fraught.

Reporters need to scrutinize official statistics and reports, the journalists noted, applying the old adage “if your mother says she loves you, check it out” to information from the police.

There is clearly no easy answer to the myriad of challenges and contradictions discussed at the Truth & Trust gathering, which was hosted by CBS 2 Chicago anchor Jim Williams and also featured Tracy Swartz, reporter for the Chicago Tribune’s RedEye tabloid edition and Michael Lansu, an editor of the Chicago Sun-Times’ Homicide Watch project.

But the bottom line is that in order to achieve nuanced, rich coverage of neighborhoods that goes beyond the latest crime statistics, key factors are just that — truth and trust. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— At Reuters, Jack Shafer picks up on my piece yesterday about how so many news organizations — with The New York Times being a notable exception — still seem afraid of reporters’ retweets coming across as endorsements: “Are NPR, the AP, and Reuters’s editorial reputations really so fragile that a 140-character tweet or retweet by a staffer can blow the whole thing down?”

— Three months into the “temporary” Chicago Sun-Times comments ban, publisher and editor-in-chief Jim Kirk tells Robert Feder “he’s heard no complaints lately and he’s seen no drop-off in online traffic.” Comments should return with a new CMS “sometime around the fourth quarter.”

— BuzzFeed’s director of editorial products, Alice DuBois, on the photo “slide things” in popular posts lately: “I do think there’s a part of the editorial mission to keep pushing and experimenting,” she tells Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon.

— The Dallas Morning News has abandoned its “premium” website, which was ad-free and aimed to be more nicely designed. “But you could see this result coming a Texas mile away,” writes Joshua Benton at Nieman Lab. “The premium site was not some beautiful, immersive experience — it was aggressively ugly and a pain to navigate.”

— “It used to be that there was an ever-more alarming growth in the hours people spent in front of the TV,” Michael Wolff writes at USA Today. “Now the greater concern is the limits of human attention.”


!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Rob Hart

One year after 28 Sun-Times photojournalists were laid off, where are they now?

One year ago today, the Chicago Sun-Times eliminated its photo staff, laying off 28 full-time employees.

Most of them have landed on their feet, according to email and phone interviews with many of the photographers. While they were sometimes hesitant to dwell on the layoffs, the former Sun-Times staffers filled me in on how their lives — and those of the photographers I couldn’t reach — have changed since May 30, 2013. Read more

Tools:
8 Comments
Chicago Sun-Times homepage

Sun-Times kills comments until it can fix ‘morass of negativity, racism, and hate speech’

Chicago Sun-Times

The Chicago Sun-Times has temporarily eliminated story commenting on its website until it can develop a system that will “foster a productive discussion rather than an embarrassing mishmash of fringe ranting and ill-informed, shrill bomb-throwing,” managing editor Craig Newman announced:

The world of Internet commenting offers a marvelous opportunity for discussion and the exchange of ideas. But as anyone who has ever ventured into a comment thread can attest, these forums too often turn into a morass of negativity, racism, hate speech and general trollish behaviors that detract from the content.

In fact, the general tone and demeanor is one of the chief criticisms we hear in regard to the usability and quality of our websites and articles. Not only have we heard your criticisms, but we often find ourselves as frustrated as our readers are with the tone and quality of commentary on our pages.

Read more
Tools:
38 Comments