Chicago Tribune

sharp-100

Reporting on rumors and the personal lives of athletes

Normally, it would have been a routine post-practice session on Sunday, March 1 for the Chicago Blackhawks. It wasn’t.

In the locker room, Patrick Sharp, one of the team’s top players, strongly denied salacious allegations that he had an affair with a teammate’s wife and other women.

Chicago Blackhawks center Patrick Sharp. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

Chicago Blackhawks center Patrick Sharp. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)

“When people delve into your personal life and make up rumors and things that are completely false and untrue, it takes a toll on you,” Sharp said.

The rumors about Sharp had been floating around town for weeks. There had been rampant chatter on message boards and strong innuendo that something was up with Sharp on sports talk radio. Finally, a Chicago site called SportsMockery, reported it had “confirmed” the story on Feb. 28, and that it was a big reason why the team wanted to trade the popular player.

Yet Chicago’s largest newspapers and other major outlets didn’t report the story until Sharp put it out there with his comments after that Sunday practice. The incident underscores the challenges the “mainstream” media faces in the new landscape.

How should newspapers like the Chicago Tribune and Sun-Times react when the dirt starts flying? Rick Morrissey, a columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, says the lines are blurred more than ever.

“Just because you can write something doesn’t mean you should,” Morrissey said. “We [The Sun-Times] hold ourselves to a higher standard. We look at it harder than some of these websites that aren’t held in the same journalistic standard.”

Morrissey said that sentiment ran strong among his colleagues in the press box. Morrissey reported they even “chided” him for even mentioning SportsMockery’s name in a column.

“They said, ‘Why are you giving them clicks [page views]?” Morrissey said. “My thought is if I write a column criticizing sites on the Internet, it’s only fair to call out the site.”

Sports Mockery bills itself as specializing “in creating a unique blend of sports content and making sports news fun.”Previously, the site offered money to get information about Sharp. In a tweet, it said:

“To anyone and everyone that has information regarding the Patrick Sharp situation, get in touch with us – info@sportsmockery.com – $$$$”

Then in its story under the label “Confirmed Rumors,” SportsMockery wrote that its information came from four independent sources that had direct ties to the Blackhawks. The story generated nearly 400,000 page views.

Yet even with the high volume of traffic, Joe Knowles, the Tribune’s associate managing editor for sports, elected not to run a follow-up story solely based on SportsMockery’s report. If Sharp hadn’t addressed the issue, it is highly unlikely the Tribune would have written anything about it. Even when its Blackhawks beat writer Chris Kuc wrote about Sharp’s comments, the Tribune still didn’t get specific about the allegations.

[Full disclosure: I write about sports media for the Tribune]

“We’ve been hearing the rumors like everyone else,” Knowles said. “We tried making some calls, but we didn’t have anything we felt comfortable going with. Just because a site like that posts a story is not enough for us to react. I don’t know their standards. We would expose ourselves to a lot of problems. It’s reckless. We don’t play that way.”

Knowles said he and his staff have debated about whether the Tribune should be reporting on the personal life of a player. He noted that the story could have some merit if the ramifications led to a player like Sharp falling out of favor with a Blackhawks management that is extremely image conscious. Even then, Knowles had his questions.

“Is it really any of our business?” Knowles said. “There’s all sorts of stuff going on in sports. We want to know these athletes as people, but there’s a line. We don’t want to cross it.”

Morrissey is firm in his stance.

“I don’t write about rumors [about the personal life of athletes],” Morrissey said. “On the flip side, I also don’t write about what great fathers and great family men they are.”

Morrissey is referring to the fallout from the Tiger Woods revelations about his personal life in 2009. Critics felt the public was duped by the marketing of Woods as a role model while he was engaged in numerous affairs.

Since then, there is a growing open-season mentality with sites like TMZ delving into the private lives of athletes. More traditional outlets like the Tribune and Sun-Times have to decide how to react to revelations that go beyond what an athlete does in a game.

Morrissey doesn’t like the trend. He wasn’t pleased he eventually had to write about the Sharp story in Chicago.

“We all get a little dirtier because of this,” Morrissey said.

*****

Recommended reading in sports journalism.

My column for the National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana addresses the growing disconnect between athletes and the media.

Bob Ryan in the Boston Globe writes about the same issue, asking, “Does it have to be Us vs. Them?”

Christine Brennan and Michael Wilbon have joined Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism as “professors of practice.”

CUIndependent has an interview with Pulitzer Prize winner John Branch of the New York Times.

Ed Sherman writes about sports media at shermanreport.com. Follow him @Sherman_Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Clark Gilbert leaves Deseret News

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Clark Gilbert will be president of BYU-Idaho. Previously, he was CEO of Deseret News and Deseret Digital Media. (Poynter)
  • Peter Kendall will be managing editor at the Chicago Tribune. Previously, he was deputy managing editor there. Colin McMahon will be associate editor at the Chicago Tribune. Previously, he was cross media editor there. Joycelyn Winnecke will be president of Tribune Content Agency. Previously, she was associate editor of the Chicago Tribune. (Poynter)
  • Tanzina Vega will be the Bronx courthouse reporter at The New York Times. Previously, she was a race reporter there. (Poynter)
  • John Reiss is now executive producer at “Meet the Press.” Previously, he was acting executive producer there. (Politico)
  • Darcie Conway is now an editor at aplus.com. Previously, she was a content curator at Upworthy. (PR Newswire)
  • Tim O’Connor will be publisher of Shape. Previously, he was a managing director for Meredith’s corporate sales group. Eric Schwarzkopf will be associate publisher at Shape. Previously, he was publisher at Fitness. Betty Wong will be vice president of brand development for Shape and Fitness. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of Fitness. (Email)

Job of the day: The New England Center for Investigative Reporting is looking for an investigative reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Tribune Publishing makes senior leadership changes

Chicago Tribune | Capital New York | Tribune Publishing

Tribune Publishing announced several high-level job moves Wednesday, shaking up the leadership ranks of The Chicago Tribune and Tribune Content Agency.

Joycelyn Winnecke, who was previously associate editor of The Tribune, will become president of Tribune Content Agency, the content syndication business that absorbed McClatchy-Tribune Information Services in May.

The Tribune, which lost managing editor Jane Hirt in November, made a series of appointments to fill out the masthead:

  • Peter Kendall, formerly deputy managing editor at The Tribune, will be managing editor there.
  • Colin McMahon, formerly cross media editor at The Tribune, will be associate editor there.
  • Marcia Lythcott has been named commentary editor at The Tribune.
  • Margaret Holt has joined the masthead to “recognize her role as standards editor for the newspaper,” according to The Tribune.

The elevations of Kendall and McMahon, who will lead The Tribune’s audience development efforts, reflect an industry-wide push to be more proactive on the fronts of social media and digital platforms, Capital New York’s Joe Pompeo writes:

The moves suggest the same digital and audience-development push that many newspapers are embarking on as they grapple with a new generation of online competitors and the flight of readers and advertisers from print platforms to laptops and mobile devices.

More appointments are forthcoming, according to The Tribune. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Sandra Martin named interim CFO at Tribune Publishing

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Sandra Martin will be interim chief financial officer at Tribune Publishing. Previously, she was senior vice president of corporate finance there. (Chicago Tribune)
  • Liz Carter is now president and CEO at The Scripps Howard Foundation. Previously, she was executive director of Cincinnati’s St. Vincent de Paul. (Scripps Howard)
  • David Pierce will be a senior writer at Wired. Previously, he was deputy editor at The Verge. Robert Capps will be head of editorial for Wired. Previously, he was deputy editor there. Mark McClusky will be head of operations at Wired. Previously, he was editor of Wired.com. Mark Robinson will be an executive editor at Wired. Previously, he was features editor there. Joe Brown will be an executive editor at Wired. Previously, he was deputy editor there. Kathleen Vignos is now director of engineering at Wired. Previously, she was interim director of engineering there. Jason Tanz will be an editor-at-large at Wired. Previously, he was executive editor there. (Poynter)
  • Ariane de Vogue will be a Supreme Court writer at CNN Politics Digital. Previously, she was a Supreme Court reporter at ABC News. (Fishbowl DC)

Job of the day: The Rapid City Journal is looking for a features editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Why NYT journalists are essentially stuck in China

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Why New York Times journalists can’t leave China

    The country's visa backlog puts people currently stationed there "in an unenviable professional position: Should they leave their posts, they can be pretty sure at this point that their editor won’t be able to replace them." (WP) | "At a news conference in Beijing alongside President Obama, China’s leader, Xi Jinping, appeared to draw a link between unfavorable coverage and access for reporters, saying that the visa problems of news organizations were of their own making." (NYT) | NYT editorial: "A confident regime that considers itself a world leader should be able to handle truthful examination and criticism." (NYT)

  2. Washington Post appends multiple editor's notes to Zakaria columns

    David Folkenflik noticed they were up. (@davidfolkenflik). | Notes are on four of the six columns flagged by the mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort (1, 2, 3, 4). One didn't take a note. One article is archived. | Washington Post editorial page Editor Fred Hiatt says Zakaria "will remain on his op-ed roster." (The Daily Beast)

  3. Jeff Bezos, weaver of metaphors

    After he invested in Business Insider, the Amazon boss (and Washington Post owner) told Henry Blodget "you are just a little flame. And the flame has been kindled, and it’s in the palm of your hand, and all around you, these big winds are swirling. And if you’re not paying attention, they can snuff that flame out, immediately.” (Re/code)

  4. Chicago Tribune won't rush to replace Jane Hirt

    Its managing editor announced yesterday she would step down. (Chicago Tribune) | "No deadline has been set to name a successor." (Robert Feder)

  5. Morning shows are your home for political ads

    "The nation's marquee network morning shows — 'Good Morning America,' 'Today' and 'CBS This Morning' — attracted more U.S. Senate race-focused ads during the 2014 midterm elections than any other television programs." "GMA" showed "nearly 30,000 U.S. Senate-focused ads during the 2014 election cycle." (The Center for Public Integrity)

  6. Your Twitter experience is going to change

    The company is "exploring ways to surface relevant Tweets so the content that is interesting to you is easy to discover – whether you stay on Twitter all day or visit for a few minutes," VP of product Kevin Weil writes. (Twitter Blog) | "There’s a dilemma at the core of Twitter’s growth problem: The very features Twitter power users love about the platform — retweets, favorites and hashtags, its distinct vocabulary — are the ones that make the service so inscrutable to the newcomer." (Digiday) | Related: "Twitter said it could generate long term margins of 40 to 45 per cent – higher than the forecast for margins of 35 to 40 per cent it made during its initial public offering last year – partly because of a greater use of targeted advertising than it had predicted." (FT)

  7. Jian Ghomeshi showed the CBC a video of an injured woman

    The video, on the former CBC radio host's phone, "shows bruising to the woman’s body (she is partially covered in the video) and information provided to CBC that weekend, including text messages Ghomeshi had on his phone, refer to a 'cracked rib,'" Kevin Donovan reports. "A large bruise could be seen on the side of her body." (Toronto Star)

  8. A new job description

    "Journalism: a fancy word for the industry in which stock photos are resized." (Gawker)

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    The Washington Post's Express illustrates the U.S.-China climate change deal. (Courtesy the Newseum)
    express-11132014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Alan English is now publisher of The (Shreveport, Louisiana) Times. Previously, he was general manager there. (Gannett) | James O'Byrne is now vice president of innovation for NOLA Media Group. Previously, he was director of state content there. Marcus Carmouche is now director of sports at NOLA Media Group. Previously, he was sports manager there. John Roach will be sports manager at NOLA Media Group. Previously, he was a sports managing producer there. Mark Lorando will direct state and metro content for NOLA.com. Previously, he was director of metro content there. (NOLA.com) | Meredith Artley is now editor-in-chief of CNN Digital. Previously, she was managing editor of CNN.com. Andrew Morse is now general manager of CNN Digital. He is senior vice president of CNN U.S. Alex Wellen is now chief product officer at CNN Digital. Previously, he was vice president of business, products, and strategy there. (Email) | Job of the day: Cox Media Group is looking for a digital content editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Jane Hirt steps down as Chicago Tribune managing editor

Chicago Tribune

Chicago Tribune Managing Editor Jane Hirt will leave “to pursue personal interests,” Robert Channick reports in the Tribune.

“I’m grateful to the Chicago Tribune for so many years of opportunities. Never a dull moment,” Hirt tweeted Wednesday.

Hirt began her career at the Tribune as an intern. She was named managing editor in 2008. She helped launch the paper’s free paper RedEye and guided the Tribune’s transition toward digital newsgathering and publishing. She plans to “take an extended break from the daily grind of journalism, with relaxing, travel, volunteer work and perhaps learning a new language on her relatively short to-do list,” Channick writes.

“Jane Hirt is an accomplished managing editor, newsroom mentor, and exceptional leader whose 25 years of contributions to Chicago Tribune are well documented,” a Chicago Tribune Media Group spokesperson told Poynter in an email. “While her departure leaves a void in our newsroom and, more importantly, our hearts, we support her decision to begin a new chapter in her life and wish her the very best.”

Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
Truth&Trust

Crime coverage in Chicago may be too good

Chicago is widely known as “Chiraq” or the “murder capital” even though its murder rate is much lower than in past years and in many other cities. Ironically this may be a function of local media’s attempts to do a better job reporting on homicides and crime

There was a time when reporters just didn’t cover many crime – or other — stories in the city’s low income, Black and Latino neighborhoods, noted veteran reporters at Poynter’s “Truth & Trust in the 21st Century” forum in Chicago Thursday. Now the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, DNAinfo and other media outlets make it a point to cover every murder in the city. But that means a lot of negative coverage about the city’s South and West sides, even as there are still relatively few other stories being reported on in these neighborhoods.

TruthTrust

When you have 10 crime stories for every uplifting story like the Jackie Robinson West Little League team, noted DNAinfo reporter Darryl Holliday, “that’s not a good ratio.” “It says that’s all that’s happening, when that’s not the case,” continued Holliday, who is also co-founder of The Illustrated Press, which does journalism through comics.

But there are not necessarily bright lines between “good” and “bad” stories, countered author Alex Kotlowitz, pointing to the “This American Life” documentary on Chicago’s Harper High as an example.

The “centrifugal force of journalism,” as Kotlowitz described it, is to “understand why kids make the decisions they make … to understand what pushes and pulls people.”

Asiaha Butler  (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

Asiaha Butler (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

But panelist Asiaha Butler told Kotlowitz she was unable to listen the Harper High documentary all the way through, since she felt it portrayed an unrealistically negative and “dramatic” view of the neighborhood where she has lived most of her life and leads the Residents Association of Greater Englewood (R.A.G.E.). She said the many untold stories in Englewood include the role of grandparents and great grandparents and the strong intergenerational structure that underpins the neighborhood.

“I’m not dodging bullets all the time,” said Butler, who with R.A.G.E. airs news on a website and a public access TV program. “You tell your own narrative, you don’t wait until the media comes.”

Like Butler, audience members at the Truth & Trust event implored reporters to do more to find and tell a wider range of stories.

“There are people who help people take out their garbage, who clean up the community … who help elders cross the street,” said Rondayle Sanders, a fifth-grader at the Bradwell School of Excellence whose class wrote an op-ed published in The Chicago Tribune presenting a fuller view of their neighborhood. “We want you to know more positive things about the South Side.”

When Sanders asked for advice in reporting, Butler suggested he start at his school “talking to the janitor, the lunch lady, hear their stories and highlight them.

In some ways it should be easier than ever for journalists to find and report a wide range of stories in different neighborhoods, since social media and new media have turned journalism from a specialized profession into an act practiced by the masses, as Kelly McBride, Poynter’s vice president of academic programs, put it.

McBride noted that these days rather than acting as gatekeepers of information and finding stories on their own, mainstream journalists are more often picking up on the stories being reported in blogs, community outlets and social media, “sorting through and magnifying” them.

But the financial crisis and budget cuts that have rocked the journalism world mean that even reporters with the best intentions struggle to get the time and space to tell the rich, multi-layered stories that do justice to a neighborhood.

“There’s no lack of these really great groups,” said Holliday. “But there are only so many journalists who can only do so many things.”

Linda Lutton (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

Linda Lutton (Photo by Kari Lydersen)

Kotlowitz noted that WBEZ reporter Linda Lutton, who was in the audience, was lucky to get substantial time to work on the Harper High story, a luxury relatively few full-time journalists are granted. Meanwhile from the audience veteran reporter Sally Duros pointed out that “good news stories are not news” or are viewed as “P.R.” by many.

Panelist Lolly Bowean, a Chicago Tribune reporter, noted that media outlets are financially and otherwise obligated to cover stories that draw readership and hence revenue. She said people often complain about the paper’s extensive coverage of rapper Chief Keef, but those are the stories that draw high numbers of views and comments.

“There has to be an appetite from the audience, from the public saying we need these stories,” said Bowean. “If there is no one paying 50 cents for that paper or going online to get it, then there is no us!”

Meanwhile panelists and audience members stressed that even as technology opens up possibilities for new and innovative ways to tell stories, there is still a crucial role for old-fashioned watchdog, accountability journalism. Reporters noted that police officers are often reticent with information about cases, and that in Chicago only about a quarter of murders are ever officially solved. The “triangle” of relationships between police, community members and journalists — as audience member David Schaper of NPR put it — is typically tense and fraught.

Reporters need to scrutinize official statistics and reports, the journalists noted, applying the old adage “if your mother says she loves you, check it out” to information from the police.

There is clearly no easy answer to the myriad of challenges and contradictions discussed at the Truth & Trust gathering, which was hosted by CBS 2 Chicago anchor Jim Williams and also featured Tracy Swartz, reporter for the Chicago Tribune’s RedEye tabloid edition and Michael Lansu, an editor of the Chicago Sun-Times’ Homicide Watch project.

But the bottom line is that in order to achieve nuanced, rich coverage of neighborhoods that goes beyond the latest crime statistics, key factors are just that — truth and trust. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
James Foley

U.S. tried to rescue James Foley

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The U.S. tried to rescue James Foley, and it declined to pay ransom: Islamic State “pressed the United States to provide a multimillion-dollar ransom for his release,” Rukmini Callimachi reports. Unlike many European countries, the U.S. and Britain will not pay ransoms for hostages. The terror group holds other Americans, including Time freelancer Steven J. Sotloff. (NYT) | David Rohde: “The divergent U.S. and European approach to abductions fails to deter captors or consistently safeguard victims.” (Reuters) | Administration officials yesterday confirmed that U.S. Special Operations forces tried to rescue Foley, but the op “was not ultimately successful because the hostages were not present . . . at the site of the operation.” (WP) | Media blackouts “don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages,” James Harkin writes. “There are arguments for and against such blackouts, and there have been lively debates among the families of the missing about their strategic value, but in principle they seem inimical to the spirit of journalism—and potentially counterproductive.” (Vanity Fair) | “Many of those taken captive have been freelance journalists hoping to carve out careers by reporting where others had feared to tread,” Ravi Somaiya and Christine Haughney report. Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron “said that The Post now uses only contracted freelancers, so it can provide them the same equipment, security and communications technology that staff reporters get.” (NYT) | French journalist Nicolas Henin, who was held with Foley but released “said Foley had faced particular abuse from their jailers because he was American and his brother is in the US air force.” (AFP)
  2. How to handle the images of Foley’s death? Jack Shafer: “More likely, the videos, which our Western eyes tell us are staged for our benefit, are really aimed at the video-makers’ constituents to attract maximum attention, showcase the groups’ power, attract recruits, and build cadres – all things that the video may actually do.” (Reuters) | James Ball: “To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.” (The Guardian) | Mathew Ingram: “A number of people had their [Twitter] accounts suspended after they shared the images, including Zaid Benjamin of Radio Sawa, but media outlets that posted photos did not.” (Gigaom)
  3. The guns of Ferguson: Police officer suspended for aiming gun at protesters, telling them he’d kill them. (WP) | Watch the video of #OfficerGoFuckYourself (The Wire) | NPPA filed a formal complaint with three Missouri police forces, asking for a formal investigation into an incident where photojournalist Raffe Lazarian asked a policeman “which way do I need to go in order to get to the media area?” In reply, NPPA General Counsel Mickey H. Osterreicher writes, “the officer drew his weapon and pointed it at Mr. Lazarian in a threatening manner and then used it to gesture in the direction he wanted him to go.” (Scribd) | “In a life-and-death situation, like when armed rioters are firing at police from the apartments behind the emblematic, burned-out QuikTrip in Ferguson, how can police tell once and for all who is a journalist and who isn’t?” (Riverfront Times) || MUSICIANS GET INVOLVED: Nelly spoke with Eric Holder. (NBC News) | Killer Mike and Talib Kweli talked about Ferguson on TV. (BuzzFeed) || Bloomberg Businessweek cover: “Race, Class, and The Future of Ferguson.” (@BW) | Time cover: “The Tragedy of Ferguson” (@neetzan)
  4. Poynter’s Kristen Hare is in Ferguson again today: She filed vignettes yesterday (longer piece TK) on the Post-Dispatch’s morning meeting, St. Louis Public Radio, Boston Globe reporter Akilah Johnson and local videojournalist John Miller. | Follow her on Twitter, and you’ll see plenty of pics of her turning the camera around on the media, like this photo of Wesley Lowery, Ryan Reilly and Alex Altman working in the Ferguson McDonald’s.
  5. Huffington Post will keep covering Ferguson after the circus leaves town: “With reader support, we’ll hire a local citizen journalist who’s been covering the turmoil and train her to become a professional journalist,” Ryan Grim writes. (HuffPost)
  6. How cable news covered Ferguson: “MSNBC devoted far more time to the story than its top competitors Fox News and CNN. … Our previous analysis of the 2012 killing of Trayvon Martin, another news story with strong racial undertones involving the shooting death of a black teen in Florida, found similar treatment by the three cable channels.” (Pew)
  7. Gatehouse parent company’s stock rises: Rise follows a Seeking Alpha post by VJ Shil that “rattled off a bunch of promising attributes: a nice dividend, an appealing acquisition pipeline, strong loyalty to local newspapers among small-town residents, the shedding of GateHouse’s massive mountain of debt through a recent bankruptcy.” (Boston Business Journal)
  8. Could Vox’s Chorus become a platform? Lockhart Steele: “perhaps Chorus should become a tool for more than just those of us employed at Vox Media, and a platform that transcends words in the ways that Vox Media has long since transcended just being a collection of websites? | FREEKY FLASHBACK: A pre-post-text Felix Salmon sang Chorus’ praises last year. (Reuters) | “Platisher”-coiner Jonathan Glick: “Not going to say it.” (@jonathanglick)
  9. Chicago Tribune cartoonist “doesn’t mind confounding readers”: “When a cartoonist chooses sides ‘you’re not engaging anyone,” Joe Fournier tells Michael Miner. “You’re just appeasing the side you’re committed to. It confuses the hell out of people when I don’t choose a side.” (Chicago Reader)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Cassie Heiter is a meteorologist at KWTV in Oklahoma City. Previously, she was a meteorologist at WQAD in Moline, Illinois. (Lacey Swope) | Matt Brickman and Kim Johnson will join WCCO 4 News This Morning in Minneapolis. Brickman currently gives weather forecasts on Saturday mornings. Johnson is currently an anchor on Saturday mornings. (CBS Minnesota) | Dan Wilson will be news director for WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida. Previously, he was interim news director there. (FTV Live) | Shellene Cockrell is now a morning anchor for KOAA in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Previously, she was a reporter for KWGN in Denver. (Colorado Springs Gazette) | Craig Melvin will be a national correspondent for the “Today Show”. Previously, he had been anchoring for MSNBC on the weekends. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: The Hill is looking for technology and cyber security reporters. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Vladimir Putin

Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

mediawiremorningHello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes. “But the claim that it has is as serious as they come in journalism.” The three words that are the “immensely powerful source of pride in what we do,” he says: “I saw that.” (The Atlantic) | Frum-related: 3 ways to prevent your apology from becoming the story, from Kristen Hare. (Poynter) | Gaza-related: Jay Rosen on why the AP revised its “members of Congress fall over each other to support Israel” tweet: “A major provider like the AP gets hit hard in the bias wars, so the principle, don’t give them ammunition! has to be built into its routines.” (Pressthink)
  3. SEC watchdog conducted lengthy leak investigation: “The SEC’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) started the investigation after Reuters published information about the regulator’s decision, taken in a closed-door meeting on Sept. 12, 2013, to settle its probe into JPMorgan Chase & Co’s massive London Whale trading loss.” Inspectors “don’t consider issues of press freedom when carrying out their investigations,” according to an OIG official. (Reuters)
  4. Media company Twitter interactions are up: The average number of Twitter interactions per month increased 159 percent between June 2013 and June 2014. John McDermott attributes that to October design tweaks that allow users to interact with retweet, reply and favorite buttons without first clicking or tapping the tweet. (Digiday)
  5. Chicago Tribune launches new website: The responsive platform — explained here by editor Gerould Kern — will be rolled out to other Tribune newspaper sites later this year, when metered paywalls will also be introduced. (Chicago Tribune) | Previously: Suggested tweets and choose-your-own adventure scrolling will be familiar to those who have visited the relaunched LA Times. (Poynter)
  6. More issues with Carol Vogel’s NYT stories? A tipster clues Erik Wemple in to three other troubling cases. But he notes “Not all eerie similarities are created equal.” (Washington Post) | A Times editor note earlier in the week acknowledges Vogel lifted part of a July 25 column from Wikipedia. (Poynter)
  7. Telegraph’s traffic up 20 percent in June: How? A “surge in Facebook traffic referral” as the Telegraph emphasized Facebook over Twitter. “It had previously been all about Twitter. Journalists are all on Twitter, and obsessed with it, so that is where the energy had gone,” Telegraph Media Group editor-in-chief Jason Seiken tells Mark Sweney. (The Guardian) | Related oldie-but-goodie: Ezra Klein tackles the “Why are journalists so obsessed with Twitter?” question. (Washington Post)
  8. Washington Business Journal won’t use the term ‘Redskins’: “I can’t dodge the question anymore,” editor-in-chief Douglas Fruehling writes in a paywalled article. (Washington Business Journal) | We’ll add them to our list of publications rejecting the football team name. (Poynter)
  9. It’s all about the clicks: “Has the Internet killed newspapers?” asks Jon Stewart. “YES!” The takeaway from this segment: Spend 15 minutes on a headline, five minutes on the article itself. (The Daily Show)
     

     

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sara Just will be the executive producer of PBS NewsHour. Formerly, she was Washington deputy bureau chief for ABC News. (PBS NewsHour) | Josh Rubin will be executive producer and managing director for video at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a producer at CNN. Allen Weiner will be an editor at large at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a vice president of research for Gartner, Inc. (The Daily Dot) | Brandi Grissom will be enterprise editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, she was managing editor of The Texas Tribune. (@brandigrissom) | Shelby Grad will be assistant managing editor for California news at the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was city editor there. Ashley Dunn will be deputy national editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was metro editor there. Mark Porubcansky, foreign editor for the Los Angeles Times, will be retiring. Kim Murphy, who has been named assistant managing editor for national and foreign news, will add international coverage to her responsibilities. (Los Angeles Times) | Oskar Garcia, news editor for the Associated Press in charge of coverage of Hawaii, will be AP’s east region sports editor. (Associated Press) | LaToya Valmont will be managing editor of Glamour. Formerly, she was production director there. Job of the day: The Newhouse School at Syracuse University is looking for a director of its Goldring Arts Journalism program. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
chicago-guns

There’s more to shootings than the numbers, says reporter who covers a lot of them

There’s a moment, when he can get to a crime scene quick enough, where everything feels weightless. Peter Nickeas looks across the scene, reads graffiti so he knows the gang territory, notes where the police stand and sees where the dead fell. Last weekend, he had a lot of those moments.

The Chicago Tribune reporter starts his shift around 10 most nights. Between July 4 and 5, 21 people were shot, two killed. By the end of the holiday weekend, 82 people had been shot in 84 hours.

“It comes down to a very catchy headline, 82 shot in 84 hours,” said Dan Haar, Chicago Tribune breaking news editor. Those numbers got picked up and retweeted. They told a story, but it wasn’t the only story. Read more

Tools:
15 Comments

Get the latest media news delivered to your inbox.


Select the newsletter(s) you'd like to receive:
Page 1 of 512345