Articles about "Chicago Tribune"


Truth&Trust

Crime coverage in Chicago may be too good

Chicago is widely known as “Chiraq” or the “murder capital” even though its murder rate is much lower than in past years and in many other cities. Ironically this may be a function of local media’s attempts to do a better job reporting on homicides and crime

There was a time when reporters just didn’t cover many crime – or other — stories in the city’s low income, Black and Latino neighborhoods, noted veteran reporters at Poynter’s “Truth & Trust in the 21st Century” forum in Chicago Thursday. Now the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, DNAinfo and other media outlets make it a point to cover every murder in the city. But that means a lot of negative coverage about the city’s South and West sides, even as there are still relatively few other stories being reported on in these neighborhoods.… Read more

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James Foley

U.S. tried to rescue James Foley

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The U.S. tried to rescue James Foley, and it declined to pay ransom: Islamic State “pressed the United States to provide a multimillion-dollar ransom for his release,” Rukmini Callimachi reports. Unlike many European countries, the U.S. and Britain will not pay ransoms for hostages. The terror group holds other Americans, including Time freelancer Steven J. Sotloff. (NYT) | David Rohde: “The divergent U.S. and European approach to abductions fails to deter captors or consistently safeguard victims.” (Reuters) | Administration officials yesterday confirmed that U.S. Special Operations forces tried to rescue Foley, but the op “was not ultimately successful because the hostages were not present . . . at the site of the operation.” (WP) | Media blackouts “don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages,” James Harkin writes.
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Vladimir Putin

Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

Hello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes.
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chicago-guns

There’s more to shootings than the numbers, says reporter who covers a lot of them

There’s a moment, when he can get to a crime scene quick enough, where everything feels weightless. Peter Nickeas looks across the scene, reads graffiti so he knows the gang territory, notes where the police stand and sees where the dead fell. Last weekend, he had a lot of those moments.

The Chicago Tribune reporter starts his shift around 10 most nights. Between July 4 and 5, 21 people were shot, two killed. By the end of the holiday weekend, 82 people had been shot in 84 hours.

“It comes down to a very catchy headline, 82 shot in 84 hours,” said Dan Haar, Chicago Tribune breaking news editor. Those numbers got picked up and retweeted. They told a story, but it wasn’t the only story.… Read more

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Target date for Tribune Publishing spinoff set

Tribune Publishing revealed a target date for its spinoff from the Tribune Company during a meeting with investors, The Chicago Tribune reported Tuesday.

The report, which attributes the information to unnamed sources, puts the date tentatively at Aug. 4, and says the investors’ meeting took place June 17 in New York. The spinoff will move the Tribune Company’s publishing assets — among them the Chicago Tribune and the Los Angeles Times — into a separate company.

In the first quarter of 2014 revenues for the company’s publishing division were down 3 percent over the same period the year before, according to an earnings report published May 20. Broadcasting revenues were up 67 percent that quarter. The decline in publishing revenues was “primarily attributable to declines in advertising revenue of $19.3 million and declines in revenues from commercial printing and delivery services of $4.1 million,” the report said.… Read more

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stethoscope in doctors office showing medical health concept

After journalism’s disruption, a reporter chooses medicine as a career

I was sitting in the lecture hall of my medical school as a first-year student when the attending physician, a gray-haired internal medicine doctor, asked a question which set off, for me, a maelstrom of emotions. He had just referenced a story in that day’s Chicago Tribune which was relevant to his lecture on physiology.

“Just curious,” he said. “How many of you even get the newspaper delivered?” Out of dozens of University of Illinois College of Medicine students in class that day — bright, eager, well-educated young people — my hand was the only one that went up.

I doubt anyone else gave it a second thought. It was a passing inquiry meant merely to highlight the changing times: pretty much every young person gets their news online these days, if they get the news at all.… Read more

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A woman poses for with the Olympic rings in Olympic Park as preparations continue for the 2014 Winter Olympics, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014, in Sochi, Russia. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Is Sochi the Peace Corps of the Olympics?

The Chicago Tribune | Deadspin | The Atlantic | The Washington Post | Yahoo Sports Canada

 

Maybe it’s because the games haven’t started yet, or maybe U.S. journalists are just accustomed to things like sheets and the ability to flush their toilet paper, but if you’ve followed along with the journalists in Sochi over the last few days, the story has mostly been about the hotel rooms. Stacy St. Clair, with the Tribune Olympic Bureau, wrote about what she’s facing in Sochi on Tuesday night for the Chicago Tribune, including a room with water that wasn’t working.

I called the front desk.

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Cover of "Secrets to Prize-Winning Journalism" (The Poynter Institute)

Learning from prize-winning journalism: tips for executing an investigative journalism project

In Poynter’s new e-book, “Secrets of Prize-Winning Journalism,” we highlight and examine 10 award-winning works from 2013 through interviews with their creators. Starting with the “secrets” shared by reporters and editors, we’ve extracted some great lessons on producing outstanding journalism.

In the first installment, we explored lessons for covering breaking news stories based on The Denver Post’s coverage of the Aurora theater shootings.

In this our second installment, we share tips for executing an investigative journalism project based on the Chicago Tribune series “Playing with Fire,” which earned a Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting, Scripps Howard Foundation Award for Public Service Reporting, Hillman Prize for Newspaper Journalism, Taylor Family Award for Fairness in Newspapers, National Headliner Award, Gerald Loeb Award, and Pulitzer Prize finalist honor.… Read more

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Screen Shot 2014-01-22 at 6.29.23 AM

Cold fronts: Snow hits newspapers’ front pages

Yeah, there’s more snow in the Northeast and more newspaper fronts to show it. Unlike with the Polar Vortex, however, this time, people seem fashionably prepared, even if public works departments did not.

In Asheville, N.C., the Citizen-Times found Bruce and his owner dressed to chill.

AM New York found a woman and her coffee ready for the cold.

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Huppke: Newspapers need a new mascot, too

Chicago Tribune

The Chicago Cubs gave columnist Rex Huppke an idea for saving his own industry. As he points out, despite many attempts to reposition the news biz, “nobody has tried a mascot.” His idea: “Nathan the Newspaper Narwhal.” Why a narwhal, Rex?

Narwhals are majestic creatures known, thanks to their long, helical tusks, as the unicorns of the sea. They represent the noble status newspapers hold in our society and, like journalists, consume pretty much whatever happens to float into their mouths.

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