Chicago Tribune

Career Beat: Clark Gilbert leaves Deseret News

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Clark Gilbert will be president of BYU-Idaho. Previously, he was CEO of Deseret News and Deseret Digital Media. (Poynter)
  • Peter Kendall will be managing editor at the Chicago Tribune. Previously, he was deputy managing editor there. Colin McMahon will be associate editor at the Chicago Tribune. Previously, he was cross media editor there. Joycelyn Winnecke will be president of Tribune Content Agency. Previously, she was associate editor of the Chicago Tribune. (Poynter)
  • Tanzina Vega will be the Bronx courthouse reporter at The New York Times. Previously, she was a race reporter there. (Poynter)
  • John Reiss is now executive producer at “Meet the Press.” Previously, he was acting executive producer there.
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Tribune Publishing makes senior leadership changes

Chicago Tribune | Capital New York | Tribune Publishing

Tribune Publishing announced several high-level job moves Wednesday, shaking up the leadership ranks of The Chicago Tribune and Tribune Content Agency.

Joycelyn Winnecke, who was previously associate editor of The Tribune, will become president of Tribune Content Agency, the content syndication business that absorbed McClatchy-Tribune Information Services in May.

The Tribune, which lost managing editor Jane Hirt in November, made a series of appointments to fill out the masthead:

  • Peter Kendall, formerly deputy managing editor at The Tribune, will be managing editor there.
  • Colin McMahon, formerly cross media editor at The Tribune, will be associate editor there.
  • Marcia Lythcott has been named commentary editor at The Tribune.
  • Margaret Holt has joined the masthead to “recognize her role as standards editor for the newspaper,” according to The Tribune.
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Career Beat: Sandra Martin named interim CFO at Tribune Publishing

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Sandra Martin will be interim chief financial officer at Tribune Publishing. Previously, she was senior vice president of corporate finance there. (Chicago Tribune)
  • Liz Carter is now president and CEO at The Scripps Howard Foundation. Previously, she was executive director of Cincinnati’s St. Vincent de Paul. (Scripps Howard)
  • David Pierce will be a senior writer at Wired. Previously, he was deputy editor at The Verge. Robert Capps will be head of editorial for Wired. Previously, he was deputy editor there. Mark McClusky will be head of operations at Wired. Previously, he was editor of Wired.com. Mark Robinson will be an executive editor at Wired. Previously, he was features editor there. Joe Brown will be an executive editor at Wired.
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Why NYT journalists are essentially stuck in China

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Why New York Times journalists can’t leave China

    The country's visa backlog puts people currently stationed there "in an unenviable professional position: Should they leave their posts, they can be pretty sure at this point that their editor won’t be able to replace them." (WP) | "At a news conference in Beijing alongside President Obama, China’s leader, Xi Jinping, appeared to draw a link between unfavorable coverage and access for reporters, saying that the visa problems of news organizations were of their own making." (NYT) | NYT editorial: "A confident regime that considers itself a world leader should be able to handle truthful examination and criticism." (NYT)

  2. Washington Post appends multiple editor's notes to Zakaria columns

    David Folkenflik noticed they were up.

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Jane Hirt steps down as Chicago Tribune managing editor

Chicago Tribune

Chicago Tribune Managing Editor Jane Hirt will leave “to pursue personal interests,” Robert Channick reports in the Tribune.

“I’m grateful to the Chicago Tribune for so many years of opportunities. Never a dull moment,” Hirt tweeted Wednesday.

Hirt began her career at the Tribune as an intern. She was named managing editor in 2008. She helped launch the paper’s free paper RedEye and guided the Tribune’s transition toward digital newsgathering and publishing. She plans to “take an extended break from the daily grind of journalism, with relaxing, travel, volunteer work and perhaps learning a new language on her relatively short to-do list,” Channick writes.

“Jane Hirt is an accomplished managing editor, newsroom mentor, and exceptional leader whose 25 years of contributions to Chicago Tribune are well documented,” a Chicago Tribune Media Group spokesperson told Poynter in an email. Read more

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Truth&Trust

Crime coverage in Chicago may be too good

Chicago is widely known as “Chiraq” or the “murder capital” even though its murder rate is much lower than in past years and in many other cities. Ironically this may be a function of local media’s attempts to do a better job reporting on homicides and crime

There was a time when reporters just didn’t cover many crime – or other — stories in the city’s low income, Black and Latino neighborhoods, noted veteran reporters at Poynter’s “Truth & Trust in the 21st Century” forum in Chicago Thursday. Now the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times, DNAinfo and other media outlets make it a point to cover every murder in the city. But that means a lot of negative coverage about the city’s South and West sides, even as there are still relatively few other stories being reported on in these neighborhoods. Read more

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James Foley

U.S. tried to rescue James Foley

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The U.S. tried to rescue James Foley, and it declined to pay ransom: Islamic State “pressed the United States to provide a multimillion-dollar ransom for his release,” Rukmini Callimachi reports. Unlike many European countries, the U.S. and Britain will not pay ransoms for hostages. The terror group holds other Americans, including Time freelancer Steven J. Sotloff. (NYT) | David Rohde: “The divergent U.S. and European approach to abductions fails to deter captors or consistently safeguard victims.” (Reuters) | Administration officials yesterday confirmed that U.S. Special Operations forces tried to rescue Foley, but the op “was not ultimately successful because the hostages were not present . . . at the site of the operation.” (WP) | Media blackouts “don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages,” James Harkin writes.
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Vladimir Putin

Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

mediawiremorningHello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes.
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chicago-guns

There’s more to shootings than the numbers, says reporter who covers a lot of them

There’s a moment, when he can get to a crime scene quick enough, where everything feels weightless. Peter Nickeas looks across the scene, reads graffiti so he knows the gang territory, notes where the police stand and sees where the dead fell. Last weekend, he had a lot of those moments.

The Chicago Tribune reporter starts his shift around 10 most nights. Between July 4 and 5, 21 people were shot, two killed. By the end of the holiday weekend, 82 people had been shot in 84 hours.

“It comes down to a very catchy headline, 82 shot in 84 hours,” said Dan Haar, Chicago Tribune breaking news editor. Those numbers got picked up and retweeted. They told a story, but it wasn’t the only story. Read more

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Target date for Tribune Publishing spinoff set

Tribune Publishing revealed a target date for its spinoff from the Tribune Company during a meeting with investors, The Chicago Tribune reported Tuesday.

The report, which attributes the information to unnamed sources, puts the date tentatively at Aug. 4, and says the investors’ meeting took place June 17 in New York. The spinoff will move the Tribune Company’s publishing assets — among them the Chicago Tribune and the Los Angeles Times — into a separate company.

In the first quarter of 2014 revenues for the company’s publishing division were down 3 percent over the same period the year before, according to an earnings report published May 20. Broadcasting revenues were up 67 percent that quarter. The decline in publishing revenues was “primarily attributable to declines in advertising revenue of $19.3 million and declines in revenues from commercial printing and delivery services of $4.1 million,” the report said. Read more

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