Newspaper carrier saves person from fire while on duty

The Reidsville Review | Greensboro News & Record | WGHP-TV

Steve Bradshaw, a newspaper carrier for Warren Buffett-owned World Media Enterprises, pulled a man from a burning house Sunday, Danielle Battaglia reports in The Reidsville Review. Bradshaw was on duty in Reidsville, N.C., Sunday morning and saw smoke at a house; he “tried to pound on the front door to see if anyone lived there.”

Bradshaw — who said he was a former volunteer firefighter — pulled a man who was inside the house out through a window. “He was overwhelmed by the smoke,” he told Battaglia.

“Had [Bradshaw] not been there the outcome could have been substantially different,” Reidsville Fire Marshal Jay Harris told the paper.

Last December, a Roanoke (Va.) Times carrier saved a woman from a fire. Read more

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Dallas Morning News gets serious about newspaper theft

Dallas Observer

Leslie Minora tells the Dallas Observer’s Joe Tone that, frustrated by two weeks of her newspaper getting filched, she “finally asked customer service to put my name on it, then I half-jokingly asked if I could include a threatening message. I was surprised when the woman laughed and seemed excited to help.”


Minora says the paper “has no idea if my building has cameras.”

Related: Roanoke Times carrier saves woman from fire | Dallas Morning News’ paywall is getting a makeover to try to capture digital-only readers Read more


New York Times passes USA Today in daily circulation

Alliance for Audited Media

U.S. newspapers saw daily circulation decrease on average by less than 1 percent from March 2012 to March 2013, according to the every-six-months report by the Alliance for Audited Media (formerly the Audit Bureau of Circulations). Sunday circulation was down 1.4 percent on average.

The Top 5 newspapers by average daily circulation: (You can click on the image for a larger version.)

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Daily newspaper circulation totals ‘do not capture the full story’ anymore

On Tuesday, the Alliance for Audited Media (formerly ABC) will announce circulation totals for American newspapers, as it has done in regular six-month cycles for as long as I can remember.

I will hazard a guess about the results, but that’s not the news this time. What’s important is that the totals — and the list of the top 25 newspapers in average daily circulation generated from them — are headed for the scrap heap.

“The total circulation numbers do not capture the full story any longer,” Neal Lulofs, executive vice president at AAM, told me in a phone interview. AAM’s board has decided to make reporting a five-day average — long the standard — optional for papers. That means come October there will be no valid comparison of daily circulation among newspapers. Read more


NAA turns feisty, boasting of ad effectiveness and digital subscription success

The Newspaper Association of America’s annual mediaXchange conference is always part industry promotion, an occasion for expressions of confidence. But at this year’s edition in Orlando last week, those sentiments had a fighting edge.

Outgoing chairman Jim Moroney, publisher and CEO of the Dallas Morning News, chose a medley of down-home, don’t-mess-with-Texas aphorisms to open the conference. He said he was ready to bet against the “gaggle of self-proclaimed experts,” predicting the industry’s imminent demise that “print newspapers will still be around in 10 years” and that they will report their “first year-to-year increase in revenues (since the mid-2000s) by this time next year.”

Moroney, affectionately called “the Nutty Professor” by a later presenter, added that the industry should “open barrels of whoopass” on its critics and “ignore the Eeyores.”

In a similar vein, Moroney’s successor, Robert Nutting, CEO of Ogden Newspapers, said later in the conference: “We need to be our own evangelists; we need to get some of our swagger back.”

So what’s the case for swagger? Read more

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Newspaper litter a First Amendment issue, town officials say

Chicago Tribune
Residents of the Chicago suburb St. Charles, Ill., have to solve the problem of uninvited newspapers themselves, town officials say. The offending papers are “often free versions of papers from media companies in the area including the Chicago Tribune, the Daily Herald, the Kane County Chronicle and the St. Charles Examiner,” City Administrator Brian Townsend tells the Tribune’s Kate Thayer.

City Attorney Gerald Gorski said the city cannot set limitations on the distribution of printed materials, although some have tried. Municipalities who in the past have regulated the practice have been shot down by the courts, he said.

“The First Amendment trumps everything,” Gorski said, adding that because the papers include not just advertising but editorial content, they are protected.

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USPS won’t end Saturday delivery

The Washington Post

The U.S. Postal Service said Wednesday it will not end Saturday delivery, something it announced in February that it planned to do.

The USPS hoped curtailing delivery on those days would help it control costs. Unlike many other government bodies, the USPS is required to pre-fund retirement obligations. In fiscal 2012, the USPS’ deficit was $16 billion. It estimated ending Saturday delivery would save about $2 billion.

The change would have landed hard on newsweeklies and community papers, many of which deliver on Saturdays. Bloomberg Businessweek announced last month that it had partnered with Gannett to have newspaper carriers deliver the magazine in some markets. It began rolling out its alternate delivery program in 2010.

Previously: Newspapers, magazines will have ‘not-great’ choices as USPS plans to end Saturday delivery | Bloomberg Businessweek expands non-postal delivery Read more


Deeper data dive finds $5.5 billion in uncounted newspaper industry revenue

Years of negative reports on ad revenue losses could leave the newspaper industry muttering, “I demand a recount.” The Newspaper Association of America has just completed such an exercise and found some solid gains that have been overlooked previously in its own measurements.

New statistics released Monday produced these findings:

• Circulation revenue was up 5 percent year-to-year in 2012.  That is the result of new digital-only subscriptions and the higher prices being charged for print-only and print-plus-digital bundles.  Paid print circulation volume continued to fall during the year, but that was more than made up for by the higher rates. Read more

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Bloomberg Businessweek expands non-postal delivery

Bloomberg Businessweek is expanding its alternate delivery program via a partnership with Gannett, the magazine will announce Monday. Subscribers in Cincinnati, Asheville, N.C., and 13 other markets will by July be able to receive their magazines via Gannett’s newspaper-delivery apparatus.

Alternate delivery systems will become more important for many weekly magazines and community newspapers if the the United States Postal Service goes through with its proposal to eliminate Saturday delivery. In February, Businessweek’s head of manufacturing and distribution, Bernie Schraml, told Poynter that one issue with alternate delivery is that the USPS prohibits private services from delivering to customers’ mailboxes. Read more


The problem with Sunday papers: Why rising numbers are not what they seem

For several years, Sunday editions have been the brightest star in a fading constellation for print newspapers. When circulation numbers were falling, Sunday routinely did better than daily. As recently as the Audit Bureau of Circulations spring report six months ago, Sunday was up 5 percent year-to-year.

But in a new ABC report released late last month, Sunday outperformed daily by a bare fraction of a percentage point — up 0.6 percent versus daily circulation down 0.2 percent. Not a horrible result, but a marked turn for the worse. Why?

Sunday growth slows

One factor is that the super-couponing craze, at its peak in the spring and summer of 2011, has run its course. Editor Neil Brown of Poynter’s Tampa Bay Times told me that the decline in couponing, together with a price increase, was the main culprit in a 5.9 percent year-to-year Sunday decline for the paper. Read more

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