Articles about "Columbia Journalism Review"


For Veterans Day, some newspapers tell love stories

Newseum | The Washington Post | CJR | Time
Most of the country's newspapers led the day with images of flags, or veterans, young and old, together and alone, remembering and trying to forget. But a few newspapers told love stories.

The Gainesville Sun fronts a story from the Salisbury (N.C.) Post that's woven through letters during World War II. (more...)
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Author’s former source sues CJR, among others

iMediaEthics A woman interviewed by former Columbia professor Bruce Porter has sued him, the Columbia Journalism Review and a documentary filmmaker, Rhonda Roland Shearer reports.

Porter first wrote about the woman for Newsweek in 1967 and violated his promise to protect her identity. He's since discussed the ethical lapse in class, written about it and participated in a documentary about his attempt to find her and apologize.

In her complaint, the woman contends that a story Porter wrote for CJR about her restates "much of the defamatory material contained in the Newsweek Article" and that and another article reveal more information, including her name and her hometown of Flint, Mich. The complaint also states that Porter arranged coverage in the Flint Journal about his search and lied to a reporter there about her whereabouts.

Acting CJR Editor-in-Chief Brent Cunningham declined to comment on the suit: "We've said all we have to say about this story," he told Poynter in an email. A 2012 story by Porter about the woman links to an editor's note in which he says she was paid $500 to participate in the documentary and that his transaction with the Flint Journal reporter "will always stay with me as an incomprehensible lapse in judgment, albeit one with good intentions."
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Cyndi Stivers: AOL home page ‘still huge, huge, huge’

AOL announced last week that Columbia Journalism Review Editor-in-Chief Cyndi Stivers had accepted the editorship of AOL.com, the company's storied Web gateway. Wait a second, I asked the journalism-industry chronicler in a phone call Monday, aren't news consumers moving away from home pages?

"Not that one!" Stivers said of AOL.com. "That’s huge. It’s still huge, huge, huge." Under her watch, she said, AOL.com will help readers: "Save them time, make them smarter, entertain them a little." Media criticism, she said, would probably not be a huge part of the home page's offerings.

AOL readers hungry for meta-reporting can still visit CJR's snazzy home page, whose flexibility Stivers cited as one of the accomplishments of her tenure. (more...)
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Starkman: Future-of-news consensus is wrong

Columbia Journalism Review
Dean Starkman synthesizes what he calls "the future-of-news (FON) consensus" in the ideas of Jeff Jarvis, Clay Shirky and Jay Rosen. The FON consensus, Starkman says, is that journalism's future will be network-driven -- that is, information will be collected and distributed by dispersed people who are actively involved in a journalistic process -- and even anti-institutional.
And let’s face it, in the debate over journalism’s future, the FON crowd has had the upper hand. The establishment is gloomy and old; the FON consensus is hopeful and young (or purports to represent youth). The establishment has no plan. The FON consensus says no plan is the plan. The establishment drones on about rules and standards; the FON thinkers talk about freedom and informality. FON says “cheap” and “free”; the establishment asks for your credit card number. FON talks about “networks,” “communities,” and “love”; the establishment mutters about “institutions,” like The New York Times or mental hospitals. ...
Starkman disagrees, though, with the FON consensus -- especially the idea that journalism will be de-institutionalized.
I’m going to make a bold leap and predict—eenie meenie chili beanie—that for a long time the Future of News is going to look unnervingly like the Present of News: hobbled news organizations, limping along, supplemented by swarms of new media outlets doing their best. It’s not sexy, but that’s journalism for you. I’ll go further and posit as axiomatic that journalism needs its own institutions for the simple reason that it reports on institutions much larger than itself. ... (more...)
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CJR

Forty-plus ‘very high quality people’ apply for CJR editor-in-chief job

Romenesko Misc.
Last Tuesday was Columbia Journalism Review editor-in-chief application deadline. (It's a newly created position. "We received more than 40 responses, and they included a pool of some very high quality people," CJR chairman Victor Navasky tells me. "We are impressed with both the applicants the news outlets with which they are or have been affiliated. Our goal is to have found our man/woman by the end of the summer."
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Columbia Journalism Review starts search for editor-in-chief

Romenesko Misc.
The job description says: "The editor-in-chief provides the editorial vision and voice, supervises a professional editorial staff of nine plus a large team of freelancers, and manages an editorial budget of more than $1M annually to make CJR a must-read for journalists, media professionals, and all thought leaders concerned with the role (and survival) of a free press in civil society." I asked CJR executive editor Mike Hoyt about the new position. His response:

There is no editor in chief now, but when one arrives I'll report to him or her, and will remain executive editor and help run the place. The editor in chief position was made possible by a funder, and I think part of the idea is somebody who enjoys meeting funders and being on future-of-journalism panels more than I do. I would rather go to the dentist than be on a panel. My plan is to put together our 50th anniversary issue (November), then help this new person and this great staff launch CJR into its next 50 years, and also to write for CJR.org and the magazine, something I am very much looking forward to doing.
More information about the job, including how to apply, is after the jump. (more...)

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