Articles about "comments"


Judge acknowledges racist, sexist Web comments, withdraws from race

Arkansas Times | Blue Hog Report
Judge Mike Maggio withdrew from a race for the Arkansas Court of Appeals after acknowledging he'd posted sexist, racist and homophobic comments on a website, Max Brantley reported Wednesday.

Maggio posted under the name "geauxjudge" on a message board called TigerDroppings.com, sharing musings on topics like "rodeo sex," someone who was "black by injection" and "Why do two men get their weiners cut off to them date each other."

Matt Campbell compiled a dossier of Maggio's postings, triangulating personal information he mentioned in his comments with facts about Maggio. In his statement acknowledging the postings, Maggio decried "the politics of personal destruction." (more...)
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Is the Internet a workplace? Lawyers debate whether online comments merit ethics probe

Feminist Law Professors | Above the Law | myShingle.com | Pacific Standard
Nancy Leong, a visiting law professor at UCLA, wrote in late December she had filed an ethics complaint with the bars that licensed a public defender who "commented about me approximately 70 times on at least five different websites, frequently remarking on my physical appearance."

The commenter used the alias "Dybbuk."

"I don’t see how it’s workable to sanction lawyers who say disgusting things online," Elie Mystal writes. "Lawyers say racist, sexist things all time. Are only the ones who say it online in ethical violation?" (more...)
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Poynter experiments with ReadrBoard reader comments

Poynter is experimenting with a new commenting and annotation tool, ReadrBoard, which allows users to chart their reactions by paragraph and leave comments inside a story.

You can tell which Poynter stories we’re testing with ReadrBoard by finding the … Read more

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FILE This July 16, 2013 FILE photo, shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Government agents in 74 countries demanded information on about 38,000 Facebook users in the first half of this year, with about half the orders coming from authorities in the United States, the company said Tuesday. The social-networking giant is the latest technology company to release figures on how often governments seek information about its customers. Microsoft and Google have done the same. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)

Want to comment on HuffPost? Just give Facebook your phone number first

Huffington Post Grab your pitchforks and text art tanks: Huffington Post is doubling down on its anonymity crackdown. The site's new commenting system, explained by Tim McDonald, HuffPost's director of community, requires users to have a Facebook account:
Here's how to get started under this new system. When you log in to your account and go to make a comment, you will be prompted to link your commenting account to your verified Facebook account. Then, choose how you'd like your name to be displayed. You can either display your first and last names, or your first name and last initial. This is the only information that will be viewable to the community at large, and you will have control over your private information via Facebook's privacy settings.
How do you get your Facebook account verified? You have to enter a confirmation code sent to you by Facebook via text message. So to comment on Huffington Post, you need to give Facebook your phone number, and you need to give HuffPost access to your Facebook account, which, Facebook says, must list your real name. Then, you can choose to post HuffPost comments under your full name or just your first name and last initial. (more...)
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Newrooms can co-exist with online comments with moderation and a strategy. (Depositphotos)

Can reporters help repair online comment sections?

Several years ago during a seminar at Poynter, we were talking about engaging our audiences.

“We ask our readers and viewers to comment on our stories,” one participant said, “but unless we respond to them, how will they know we’re … Read more

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Despite complaints, comments broadly allowed on many news sites

With the recent focus on online reader comments — see The New Yorker on “The Psychology of Online Comments” and The New York Times Magazine on “Four Ways to Improve the Culture of Commenting” — it’s a good time to … Read more

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NPR says the sources it gets through Facebook are worth the heated comments

Thursday morning NPR posted a query on Facebook: "Do you know of an innovative African American start-up or technologist active in Silicon Valley or in your community? Share your thoughts here or email tellmemore@npr.org #NPRBlacksinTech." The NPR show "Tell Me More" often features the stories and voices of minorities.

Here's a smattering of what followed, organized into some themes that emerged. The outraged and confused: "Why does their race matter? Racists!!!" (more...)
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Splitsider, too, ends Web comments

Splitsider | On the Media
The comedy site Splitsider is turning off comments on most of its stories, Editor Adam Frucci writes. "For one, we've never had much of a commenting community to begin with," he explains, continuing:
Unlike sites about politics or social matters, people don't seem to have much to say about comedy news. And when we do get comments, much of the time they're either offensive or just without any real substance. We put a lot of work into the content on this site, and it's frustrating to have folks finish reading an article only to be confronted with mean-spirited garbage at the bottom of the page. Furthermore, we're a small team without the time and energy to dedicate to policing and cleaning up comments. So we're getting rid of them. And I'll be honest, it feels pretty great.
"So, no comments > completely unmoderated comments," PJ Vogt writes for On the Media. "That said, I'm not sure how hard it is to moderate, even on a shoestring budget."

Previously: Popular Science eliminates comments | Popular Science editor: Comments ‘became too much to really fight back’ against

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Climate-change deniers can still leave comments at L.A. Times

The Los Angeles Times will not publish letters from climate-change deniers, but it does allow online comments that express that point of view, as long as they're not too mean.

The Times can remove "inappropriate" comments, Hillary Manning, director of communications for the Times, told Poynter in an e-mail yesterday. Otherwise, its policy is similar to those at many other sites: Comments must be "germane to the article," and they can't be "abusive, off-topic or foul." They can't be "racist, sexist or homophobic." They can't advertise or spam, and they can't "celebrate the death, injury or illness of any person, public figure or otherwise."

At the bottom of each comments section, Manning notes, is a sentence saying, "The Times makes no guarantee of comments' factual accuracy."

Related: L.A. Times will no longer print letters that deny climate change | Report: Stories about politics inspire best, worst comments
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What a commenter has to do to get banned from The New York Times

In a recent WAN-IFRA report, New York Times Community Manager Bassey Etim said his organization has banned commenters "maybe once or twice in our history.” Reached by phone, Etim said the number has gone up since he gave an interview to the report's authors, but not by much: "It’s very, very rare for us," he said. "It’s fewer than 10 nonspammers."

Yes, the Times will ban spammers, but real people need to seriously misbehave to get the hook, Etim said. One early stop for someone violating the site's commenting rules is a "low reputation" list that gets his or her comments reviewed by one of the Times' 13 moderators. (The Times has "essentially had the same team of moderators for years and years," Etim said, giving the Times' decisions, which it acknowledges are subjective, some continuity and institutional knowledge.)

"Threats of violence are the only thing I’ll ban for, really," Etim said. The "vast majority of that handful" of people the Times has banned has made "really racist statements combined with a death threat against a whole race."

The Times would refer a specific death threat to the police, but "we’ve never had a specific, actionable death threat against a reporter." (more...)
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