Articles about "Conde Nast"


Connor Schell, Bill Simmons

ESPN ‘frees’ Bill Simmons, but will he seek more freedom elsewhere?

mediawiremorningIt’s Wednesday. That means you get 10 media stories.

  1. Freed Simmons: ESPN’s Bill Simmons returns to the network today after his three-week suspension “for calling N.F.L. Commissioner Roger Goodell a ‘liar’ during a podcast, and then effectively daring ESPN to punish him.” His contract expires next fall, Jonathan Mahler and Richard Sandomir report. Will he leave? (New York Times) | Deadspin would take him. (Deadspin) | Previously: At the time of the suspension, Kelly McBride wrote, “when your biggest star declares himself above his newsroom’s standards, the boss has to respond.” (Poynter)
  2. Oops — ABC News didn’t beat NBC after all: Two weeks ago, Nielsen reported that ABC’s “World News Tonight” topped “NBC Nightly News” for the first time in 260 weeks. But it turns out NBC actually kept its streak alive thanks to revised ratings after Nielsen discovered inaccuracies, Bill Carter reports. (New York Times)
  3. How Time is getting all that traffic: “Time, together with sister site Money, published at least five different pieces” on the day the cable channel FXX began its marathon of “The Simpsons.” Joseph Lichterman takes a deep look at how Time is engaging its audience — and how it has more than doubled its unique visitors in a year. (Nieman Lab) | Previously: Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll (Poynter)
  4. AP’s Gannon speaks: “Honestly, I’ve thought it through so many times — I know neither Anja or I would have done anything differently,” says AP correspondent Kathy Gannon in her first interview since she and photographer Anja Niedringhaus were attacked in Afghanistan in April. Niedringhaus was killed, and Gannon “was hit with six bullets that ripped through her left arm, right hand and left shoulder, shattering her shoulder blade.” (Poynter)
  5. Layoffs at CNN, Conde Nast: CNN has closed its entertainment news division, and shows including Christiane Amanpour’s have lost their production staffs, Alex Weprin reports. (Capital New York) Meanwhile, “Condé Nast is expected to lay off 70 to 80 employees within the next week or two, primarily from the group that oversees ad sales,” writes Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg. (Wall Street Journal)
  6. Baltimore Sun redesign: A Los Angeles-times style redesign comes to another Tribune newspaper. Among the advantages, writes executive editor Trif Alatzas: “Endless-scroll technology connects you to other news categories and related articles and images without page breaks at the end of an article or Web page.” (Baltimore Sun) | Previously: New L.A. Times site: precooked tweets and a new flavor of infinite scroll (Poynter) | How news sites are adding continuous scrolls to article pages (Poynter)
  7. Vox’s email newsletter debuts today: One differentiator: It’ll be sent in the evening, not the morning. And it’ll consist of, uh, “sentences.” (Nieman Lab)
  8. ICYMI: The South Florida Sun Sentinel is reducing its emphasis on print, and that means changing things beyond workflow: “It’s our language, how we talk,” associate editor Anne Vasquez told Kristen Hare. For instance, “‘That was a great paper today’ or ‘Write that story for 1A.’” (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The final edition of the San Francisco Bay Guardian, “one of the most venerable, staunchly independent, and defiantly weird of America’s great alternative weekly newspapers,” as Slate’s Will Oremus describes it.
     
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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Justin Bank is deputy editor of audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he ran The Washington Post’s audience and digital news team. (The New York Times) | Dao Nguyen is now BuzzFeed’s publisher. Previously, she was vice president of growth and data there. (Poynter) | Michael Dimock has been named president of the Pew Research Center. Previously, he was executive vice president there. (Politico) | Tessa Gould is senior director of native advertising at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was director of HuffPost’s partner studio. (Huffington Post) | Kevin Gentzel has been named head of advertising sales for Yahoo. Previously, he was chief revenue officer for The Washington Post. (Poynter) | Peter Cooper will be the writer and editor for the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. He’s a music columnist for The Tennessean. (The Tennessean) | Sean Kelley will be managing editor of Cooking Light. Previously, he was director of content and video for Sharecare. Katie Barreira will be director of Cooking Light Kitchen. Previously, she was food editor of Every Day with Rachael Ray. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: GoLocalPDX is looking for an investigative reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Career Beat: Former NFL wide receiver Donte Stallworth joins HuffPost

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Michael Bloomberg will replace Daniel Doctoroff as chief executive officer of Bloomberg LP. Previously, Bloomberg was mayor of New York City. (New York Times)
  • Gina Sanders is now president of Condé Nast Global Development. She was president and CEO of Fairchild Fashion Media. (Condé Nast)
  • Brian Olsavsky will be chief financial officer for Amazon.com, Inc. He is the company’s vice president of finance. (Amazon)
  • Donte Stallworth is a politics fellow at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was a coaching intern with the Baltimore Ravens. Before that, he was an NFL wide receiver. (HuffPost Politics)
  • Chris Meighan is now design director of The Washington Post’s mobile initiative. Previously, he was The Post’s deputy design director. (The Washington Post)
  • Doris Truong will be weekend editor for The Washington Post’s universal desk. She is the homepage editor for The Post. (The Washington Post)
  • Joe Vardon will cover LeBron James for the Northeast Ohio Media Group. He was a reporter for the Columbus Dispatch. (Romenesko)
  • Tom Gara will be deputy editor for BuzzFeed Business. He is the corporate news editor for The Wall Street Journal. (Recode)
  • David Gehring will be vice president of partnerships for Guardian News & Media. He was the head of global alliances and strategic partnerships for Google. (Release)

Job of the day: The Dallas Morning News is looking for a photographer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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Timeline: Who’s in and who’s out at Condé Nast

Condé Nast made another high-profile promotion today, appointing Gina Sanders president of Condé Nast Global Development. Hers is the the latest in a series of promotions, hires and departures that has transformed the company’s executive team in recent months. Here’s a quick recap of the shakeup: Read more

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Hand reaching from the grave

How your byline could outlive you

mediawiremorningGood morning. September. Media stories. Let’s do this.

  1. Facebook may not be publishers’ friend: Editorial decisions are increasingly replaced by Facebook’s opaque algorithm, Emily Bell writes: “Accountability is not part of Silicon Valley’s culture. But surely as news moves beyond paper and publisher, it must become so.” (The Guardian) | Related: “Get ready to see a new set of Facebook publishers who see big and mysterious traffic boosts in the near future, as Facebook rolls out its autoplaying video.” (Re/code)
  2. Who will run Condé after Si? At some point Si Newhouse will no longer run the company. Soon-to-be-former Fairchild honcho Gina Sanders is someone to watch, Joe Pompeo writes. (Capital)
  3. What you need to know about this Jennifer Lawrence nude-pictures thing: The FBI is investigating how naked photos of several celebrities ended up online. (AP) | Gabrielle Bluestone‘s primer on the mess. (Gawker) | More photos began circulating Monday. (BuzzFeed) | David Kushner‘s exquisitely timed profile of Anonymous. (The New Yorker)
  4. Mental Floss finds success with video listicles: The publication’s John Green-hosted videos, which have names like “48 Names for Things You Didn’t Know Had Names,” were “each viewed an average of about 921,000 times,” Christine Haughney reports. Those videos “account for about 12 percent of the magazine’s advertising revenue and 5 percent of the company’s overall revenues, which includes circulation and e-commerce.” (NYT) | From February: “Mental Floss a big winner after Facebook’s mysterious ‘high quality’ algorithm change” (Poynter)
  5. Death of print may not arrive on schedule: “I do think that someday print will not be around, but I’ll have to say that it’s much farther into the future than many of us were talking about four years ago,” Atlantic muckety-muck Bob Cohn tells Samir Husni. (Mr. Magazine)
  6. Lessons from being The Guardian’s women’s editor: “No longer can I enter a room, watch TV or simply take part in a conversation without thinking, ‘What about the women?’” Jane Martinson writes. (The Guardian) | She’s leaving the role to oversee The Guardian’s media coverage. (The Guardian)
  7. CNN remembers Sarmad Qaseera: The photojournalist died Monday. He was 42. (CNN)
  8. How a dead reporter’s name can end up on a New York Times obit: When subjects of advance-written obituaries outlive their author, “if the byline is celebrated enough — and the writing too good to consign to the dustbin — our editors may decide to publish the obit, as if from beyond the grave, once its subject has joined its author,” Margalit Fox writes. “The result is a vivid journalistic status symbol the author will never see.” (NYT) | Sort-of related: How the Times put together Anthony Shadid’s obituary. (Poynter)
  9. How NYT covered Arthur Sulzberger Jr.’s wedding: The publisher’s wedding to Gabrielle Elise Greene received “no major notice in the Times Sunday styles wedding pages, garnering the same announcement as anyone else.” (Strupp Blog)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Shekhar Gupta is now editorial adviser for India Today Group. Previously, he was editor-in-chief there. (Scroll.in) | David Muir is now the anchor and managing editor of “World News Tonight.” Previously, he was a fill-in anchor for Diane Sawyer (ABC News) | Rona Fairhead has been chosen to chair the BBC Trust. Previously, she was CEO of the Financial Times Group. (The Guardian) | Chelsea Clinton is leaving NBC News. Previously, she was a special correspondent there. (Chelsea Clinton) | Lesley Visser, Amy Trask, Tracy Wolfson, Dana Jacobson and Allie LaForce will be panelists on “We Need to Talk.” Visser is a reporter for “The NFL Today.” LaForce is a sideline reporter for CBS. Trask is the former CEO of the Oakland Raiders. Wolfson is a sports reporter for CBS. Jacobson is a host for CBS Sports Network. (CBS Sports) | Job of the Day: Chalkbeat is looking for a staff reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Major thanks to Sam Kirkland for keeping this roundup going while I was away. Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Another executive leaves Condé Nast

The Wrap | Condé Nast

Condé Nast announced the departure of another member of its executive team Thursday, the third in the last two months.

Lou Cona, chief revenue officer of Condé Nast and president of Condé Nast Media Group, will be leaving the company, according to a press release. No reason was provided for his departure. Read more

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foley 2

James Foley’s mother: ‘We have never been prouder of our son Jim’

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ISIS video appears to show James Foley’s execution: Masked executioner speaking “with what sounds like an East London accent…. says that Mr. Foley’s execution is in retaliation for the recent American airstrikes ordered by President Obama against the extremist group in Iraq.” (NYT) | Foley’s mother, Diane Foley, on Facebook: “We have never been prouder of our son Jim. He gave his life trying to expose the world to the suffering of the Syrian people. We implore the kidnappers to spare the lives of the remaining hostages. Like Jim, they are innocents. They have no control over American government policy in Iraq, Syria or anywhere in the world.” (Find James Foley) | “As of 7 a.m. local time on Wednesday, Foley’s family in New Hampshire had no confirmation from the US government of Jim’s death, and they acknowledged there is a small chance the video may still prove to be fake.” (GlobalPost) | Here are some links to stories published at the one-year anniversary of his disappearance, last November. (Poynter) | The video also showed ISIS threatening another journalist, Steven Sotloff, who has been missing since last August. (NYDN) | Both the New York Daily News and the New York Post front Foley’s execution, with the New York Post choosing an image of his executioner applying a knife to his throat. (Via Newseum) | “Twitter is ‘actively suspending accounts’ of users posting images related to the apparent execution of journalist James Wright Foley, CEO Dick Costolo announced today.” (Re/code) | “Social Media Companies Scramble to Block Terrorist Video of Journalist’s Murder” (Foreign Policy)
  2. Meanwhile, in Ferguson: Police entered the media pen early Wednesday searching for protesters. I collected a few tweets about the incident. | 47 arrests last night, three handguns seized. (St. Louis Post-Dispatch) | Post-Dispatch front page: “A Day of Recovery” (Via Newseum, of course) | Poynter’s Kristen Hare is in Ferguson and STL today, reporting on newsgathering there. She has a gas mask all lined up. Say hi if you see her! Follow her on Twitter: @kristenhare. | Hare’s first post.
  3. Apple’s best-sourced reporter is a 20-year-old college student: Mark Gurman “makes more than six figures a year as senior editor and scoop master at 9to5Mac.com,” Michael Rosenwald writes. (CJR)
  4. Twitter confirms you’ll start seeing tweets from people you don’t follow: “The aim seems to be to increase the chance that more users may see content that they might find interesting.” (The Guardian) | “On the Facebookification of Twitter and the Twitterfication of Facebook” (Poynter)
  5. Snapchat moves into news: A new service called Snapchat Discovery “would let users read daily editions of publications as well as watch video clips of TV shows or movies by holding down a finger on the screen, like they do with photos and other messages on the app before disappearing.” (WSJ) | “Here is what Snapnews looks like in its primitive form: A ninety-second reel, divided into small units, each composed by finger or stylus. Who knew!” (The Awl) | Related: The Washington Post is on Yo. “We’ll YO every time we publish a new article on NSA or cybersecurity.” (@migold)
  6. Remembering Charles M. Young: The rock writer died Monday. He was 63. “He made his mark covering the CBGBs scene in the mid-1970s, writing Rolling Stone’s first major pieces on the Ramones, Patti Smith and Television, among others. He brought a fresh sense of humor to the magazine’s Random Notes section, and championed critically-disrespected bands like Van Halen.” (Rolling Stone) | Young in 2001: “It’s physically painful for me to squelch my writing style to fit some editor’s idea of useful consumer advice. I hate rating records with numbers and stars and grades. I hate lists.” (Rockcritics.com)
  7. Fareed Zakaria again faces plagiarism accusations: With Benny Johnson‘s pelt on their wall, @blippoblappo & @crushingbort turn their attention to the Atlantic Media contributor. (Our Bad Media) | Time will review Zakaria’s work again. “Fred Hiatt, the editorial page editor of The Washington Post, called the new accusations ‘reckless’ in a statement to Poynter.” (Poynter) | Zakaria’s full response: “These are all facts, not someone else’s writing or opinions or expressions.” (Politico)
  8. Condé Nast sells Fairchild: “Penske Media Corp. is acquiring Fairchild Fashion Media from Condé Nast, in a deal that includes WWD, its archive, Footwear News, M Magazine and the Fairchild Summits and events business.” (WWD) | “This is the second time this month that Condé Nast, which owns magazines such as Vogue and Vanity Fair, has sold an asset. It recently offloaded the shopping magazine Lucky, merging it with the online retailer BeachMint.” (NYT)
  9. Creative Loafing Charlotte sold: Charles Womack, the publisher of Yes! Weekly in Greensboro, North Carolina, purchased the alt-weekly from SouthComm, Inc. (Yes! Weekly)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Mabel Martinez is now beauty editor of Siempre Mujer. Previously, she was an editorial assistant at Parade Magazine. (Meredith) | Kelly Lattimer is now vice president and general manager of WQRF in Rockford, Illinois. Previously, she was general sales manager for KFXA in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (Nexstar) | Nora Zimmett is now senior vice president of live programming at The Weather Channel. Formerly, she was an executive producer at CNN. (TV Newser) | Paul Steinhauser will be political director for NH1. Formerly, he was CNN’s political editor. (Fishbowl DC) | Ama Daetz is now an evening anchor at KGO. Previously, she was a weekend anchor there. (TV Spy) | Job of the day: Willamette Week is looking for a reporter in Portland, Oregon. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) Send Ben your job moves:bmullin@poynter.org.

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Career Beat: Maureen Dowd is a staff writer at NYT Magazine

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Drew Schutte is now publisher of Details. Formerly, he was executive vice president and chief integration officer at Condé Nast. (Condé Nast)
  • Maureen Dowd is now a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine. She will keep her Sunday column for the Times. (New York Times)
  • Austin Beutner is now publisher and CEO of the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was rumored to be interested in buying the newspaper. (Poynter)
  • Claudia Milne is head of live TV at Bloomberg. Formerly, she was the deputy editor of World News America for the BBC. (@claudmilne)
  • Michael Shamberg and Jordan Peele will advise BuzzFeed Motion Pictures. Shamberg was executive producer for Django Unchained. Peele is a comedian. (BuzzFeed)

Job of the day: The Seattle Times is looking for an associate news producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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2 bosses depart Condé Nast, former Time Inc. exec joins as CFO

Condé Nast CEO Charles Townsend announced Wednesday the hiring of a new chief financial officer and the departure of two company executives.

In a memo to employees, Townsend announced that David Geithner will be joining the company as CFO, replacing John Bellando, who “has decided to leave the company.” Geithner is a former Time Inc. executive who lost his job when the company was reorganized earlier this year. Also gone is Thomas Wallace, Condé Nast’s editorial director since 2005. Read more

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Conde Nast ends internship program

WWD

Conde Nast plans to end its internship program beginning next year, Erik Maza reports in Women’s Wear Daily.

“The end of the program comes after the publisher was sued this summer by two former interns who claimed they were paid below the minimum wage during internships at W and The New Yorker,” he writes. Read more

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New Yorker introduces Aaron Swartz-developed privacy tool Strongbox

The New Yorker | The Washington Post | The New York Times | Wired | Guardian | All Things D

The New Yorker on Tuesday introduced its new, anonymous electronic tip tool Strongbox, coincidentally on the heels of renewed concerns over privacy for journalists’ sources following revelations of Department of Justice surveillance of AP staffers (which The Washington Post’s Timothy B. Lee notes is “likely perfectly legal”)

The Strongbox site ostensibly allows people to submit letters, documents, emails or any other files to the New Yorker anonymously. It was developed in conjunction with Wired investigations editor Kevin Poulsen and the late Web activist and developer Aaron Swartz, who hanged himself in January after facing charges of wire fraud and computer fraud. Poulsen, whose publication also is owned by New Yorker parent Conde Nast, wrote about Swartz’s involvement, and why Strongbox was a necessity.

There’s a growing technology gap: phone records, e-mail, computer forensics, and outright hacking are valuable weapons for anyone looking to identify a journalist’s source. With some exceptions, the press has done little to keep pace: our information-security efforts tend to gravitate toward the parts of our infrastructure that accept credit cards.

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