Articles about "Corrections and errors"


The Economist clarifies: It does not consider Narendra Modi a ‘pain in the ass’

A good editor’s note hitchhikes on the bottom of a column about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s visit to New York:

Editor’s note: The second sentence of this blog post was changed on September 29th to make clear that The Economist does not consider Mr Modi to be a “pain in the ass”; that epithet is merely how we imagined an uninformed New Yorker might feel about someone who causes a traffic jam.

Modi at Madison Square Garden on Sunday. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

Earlier this month, The Economist withdrew a book review that appeared to defend slave owners. It kept the review online “in the interests of transparency,” something famous corrections blogger Craig Silverman applauded:

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NYT corrects: Wookiee has two ‘e’s

An important note rides below Brooks Barnes’ story about “Star Wars Rebels.”

Correction: September 25, 2014
An earlier version of this article misspelled the name of a creature in the “Star Wars” universe. It is a wookiee, not a wookie.

Last April the Tampa Bay Times, which Poynter owns, wrote a very good correction about a “Star Wars” mistake. … Read more

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Amazing name leads to amusing Huffington Post correction

A Huffington Post story about a woman with an awesome name (“Cherries Waffles Tennis”) and her brush with the law resulted in an amusing correction:

CORRECTION: An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated that Tennis was arrested for allegedly making “fraudulent purposes.” Clearly that is neither a crime nor a statement that makes any sense. She was arrested for allegedly making fraudulent purchases.

But that may not have been the original version of the correction. According to the Twitter account @_youhadonejob, the correction originally restated the mistaken text:

Fair warning: I didn’t see the original allegedly incorrect correction for myself on the HuffPost site.

Related:

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NYT corrects: Joan Rivers did not die before she was born

The bottom of The New York Times’ Sept. 4 obituary of Joan Rivers corrected the following error:

Correction: September 4, 2014
“An earlier version of a label that appeared with this obituary on the home page of NYTimes.com misstated the year of Ms. Rivers’s death. It was 2014, of course, not 1914.”

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NYT corrects: Bald eagles’ poop isn’t purple

A New York Times correction delves into the nitty gritty of bald eagle and osprey poop:

An earlier version of this article described bald eagles and ospreys incorrectly. They eat fish, and their poop is white; they do not eat berries and excrete purple feces. (Other birds, like American robins, Eurasian starlings and cedar waxwings, do.)

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Tennessean-AP

Tennessean will use data, not ‘the journalist’s gut,’ to make decisions

Good morning. Here are 10 (ha ha, OK, you got me, it’s more than 10) media stories.

  1. 21st Century Fox won’t pursue Time Warner: Rupert Murdoch sent a honcho-to-honcho email to Jeffrey L. Bewkes Tuesday afternoon, notifying the Time Warner chief he was withdrawing his previous offer. (NYT) | “Arguably, shareholders had scuttled” the deal already, Brian Stelter writes: “21st Century Fox shares had dropped nearly 10% since the initial bid for Time Warner earlier this summer.” (CNN) | “Long media nerd earnings day. Was going to be fun. But now… [sad trombone]” (@pkafka) | “One large Fox investor said the market is worried about Murdoch’s discipline when it comes to deal-making,” Cristina Alesci reported Tuesday morning. (CNN) | Time Warner revenue was up 3 percent in the second quarter of 2014 over the same period the year before.
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The Wall Street Journal fails ‘Monsters of Greek Mythology 101′

Someone at the Wall Street Journal can’t tell a Minotaur from a Cyclopes. As a result, the paper published a monstrous correction this week:

The Minotaur is a monster in Greek mythology that is part bull, part human. A travel article in Saturday’s Off Duty section mistakenly called it a one-eyed monster.

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NPR left two words out of the Declaration of Independence, listeners caught mistake

NPR

In its annual reading of the Declaration of Independence, NPR’s “Morning Edition” accidentally omitted two words.

On Monday, hosts Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep apologized to Thomas Jefferson, the original colonies and the whole country for leaving out the words, “establish commerce.”

“The most impressive part of the episode is that sharp-eared listeners caught this omission fairly deep in our founding document,” Montagne said. “If we’d said, ‘When in the course of events,’ many people would have caught it.”

She and Inskeep thought of other well-known documents and what those would look like minus a word or two.

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The Sun corrects: Man complains once or twice a week, not every day

British newspaper The Sun called Marcus Stead “Britain’s biggest whinger” — “whinger” means “whiner” — saying he complained to a local government body every day. It corrected the article:

Mr Stead says that, in fact, the number of complaints is closer to one or two per week. We are happy to put his position on record.

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D.C. gossip columnist’s obit relates corrections she took

The Washington Post

Diana McLellan died Wednesday. The former gossip columnist for The Washington Star, The Washington Post and The Washington Times was 76. Adam Bernstein’s obituary for McLellan includes a quote from former Star columnist Jack Germond, who said she “did not make a fetish of checking out fully every little nugget that came her way.”

For example:

Once, at the Star, she noted a “D. Acheson” on a party guest list and erroneously reported in her column the attendance of statesman Dean Acheson.

In her apology to readers, she wrote that “Ear writhed with anguish to learn that Dean Acheson, whom it had listed among Terrifics whooping it up at a divine party recently, is a teensy bit dead, and has been for ages.”

When she was at the Post, Bernstein writes, McLellan wrote that Jimmy Carter had bugged Blair House, where Ronald Reagan was staying as he prepared to become president.… Read more

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