Articles about "Crunks12"


Vogue mistakenly refers to high ranking State Department official as an interior designer

Kudos to @RebeccaKatz for spotting this wonderful correction in the October issue of Vogue:

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The New York Times corrects a claim that Muammar el-Qaddafi once exposed himself to former French president’s ex-wife:

An article on Sunday about the diplomatic life of J. Christopher Stevens, the American ambassador to Libya who was killed in an attack there last week, referred incompletely to an account Mr. Stevens gave of a meeting between Cécilia Sarkozy, then the wife of the French president, with the Libyan dictator Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi in 2007. While Mr. Stevens passed along gossip that said Qaddafi had opened his robes during the meeting and was naked underneath, the former Mrs. Sarkozy, now Mrs. Attias, says that Mr. Stevens was not at the meeting and that the anecdote he repeated is not true.

The article also misidentified the country in which Mr. Stevens served with a former diplomat, John Bell. They were in Egypt, not in Syria.

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The Bangor Daily News corrects an article that mixed up mammary and memory:

An earlier version of this story should have said BPA potentially affects the mammary gland. The story incorrectly identified the organ as the memory gland.

Thank to Charles Apple for sending it in.

Bangor Daily News

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New York Times obituary for Gore Vidal included three notable errors

An earlier version misstated the term Mr. Vidal called William F. Buckley Jr. in a television appearance during the 1968 Democratic National Convention. It was crypto-Nazi, not crypto-fascist. It also described incorrectly Mr. Vidal’s connection with former Vice President Al Gore. Although Mr. Vidal frequently referred jokingly to Mr. Gore as his cousin, they were not related. And Mr. Vidal’s relationship with his longtime live-in companion, Howard Austen, was also described incorrectly.  According to Mr. Vidal’s memoir “Palimpsest,” they had sex the night they met, but did not sleep together after they began living together. It was not true that they never had sex.

Related: This is reminiscent of the New York Times’ appraisal of Walter Cronkite, which contained seven errors.

The New York Times

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Fake Bill Keller column represents emerging form of social hoax

I suppose some congratulations are in order to the folks at WikiLeaks. They appear to have spent months planning a hoax and pounced when the right conditions presented themselves.

The result was a fake Bill Keller New York Times column that fooled journalists, including the Times’ own Nick Bilton. The column generated discussion and attracted attention to the WikiLeaks cause, which I imagine was the point.

At the same time, the hoax had a shelf life of less than 24 hours. The hoax op-ed began circulating Saturday night and on Sunday morning Keller knocked it down on Twitter:


That was enough time to make a dent in the media consciousness, but a relatively small impact given what seems to be a decent amount of time spent planning the hoax. Read more

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Gizmodo issues frank correction after falling for false rumor about new iPhone

Editor’s note: We fucked this up. Our bad. And then we fucked it up again by taking the post down. Double-bad; it’s back up now. In the months leading up to an expected Apple announcement there’s always a crazy swirl of rumors and speculation that can catch someone off guard. That said, we’re supposed to be the guys who don’t get caught, and for that we apologize.

Hat tip to Jim Roberts (nytjim)

Gizmodo

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Jonah Goldberg offers a correction and apology to fans of King Kong and Godzilla:

I misspoke this evening on the Special Report panel. I suggested that Godzilla was less destructive than King Kong. And everyone knows that it’s the other way around. I apologize for any offense to the Kong family or to Godzilla’s fans — or victims.

National Review

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CNBC reporter apologizes after falling for teenager’s hoax

CNBC reporter Darren Rovell has apologized after discovering that a story he wrote back in November included hoax material given to him by a source.

Cautionary lesson: Rovell only spoke to the source by email and never made any other attempts to confirm his story.

In the end, he quoted a collection of made-up facts and figures provided to him by what Deadspin describes as a “bored” 18-year-old high school senior.

After Deadspin broke the story, CNBC removed the offending section from Rovell’s report, and added a correction which links to an apology from Rovell.

The story started with an attempt by Rovell to use social media to gather stories from people who had been affected by the NBA lockout:

One response came from a person who went by the name Henry James and used the email address “hankinthebank1@gmail.com.” He told Rovell he ran an escort service that was feeling the pinch due to a dropoff in patronage from NBA players. Read more

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A Philadelphia Daily News editor’s note emphasizes that bath salts are not the same as LSD:

The commenters below have made some good points about there being a difference between bath salts and LSD. We’ve edited this story to try to make that clear.

Also, here are a few links to stories that breakdown the differences and provide details on what bath salts actually are.

Via Daniel Denvir

Philadelphia Daily News

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Reuters corrects a misquote that said Facebook’s COO suffers from anxiety:

This story corrected paragraph 6 to show Sandberg said she sometimes gets anxious, not that she suffers from anxiety


Reuters

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