Articles about "Daily Mail"


Washington Post looks toward national audience with Kindle Fire app

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Washington Post looks toward national audience with new Kindle Fire app

    This is important: It will not provide local news. Updates every day at 5 a.m. and 5 p.m. Free for six months, a buck for the next six months. (WP) | Post people said owner Jeff Bezos "had made it clear, through meetings with executives and through feedback on ideas and proposals, that The Post’s broad strategy should shift toward growing its national and international audience — in direct contrast to its previous mission of narrowing its focus to local news." (NYT) | The Post also launched "BrandConnect Perspective" Thursday, a native advertising initiative for opinion pieces. First up is Bayer, with "Modern Agriculture is Based on Sound Science." (WP) | Related: Former Post Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli's North Base Media is an investor in Inkl, a "Spotify for media content." (StartupSmart)

  2. Bill Cosby and the media

    "I think if you want to consider yourself to be serious, it will not appear anywhere," he warns Brett Zongker after declining to comment on rape allegations.

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Britain NSA Surveillance

Obama administration knew in advance about destruction of Guardian’s hard drives

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories. Want more roundups? We got ‘em! From Sam Kirkland: “Why are so many news organizations still worried about retweets by staffers?” From Kristen Hare: “Chinese journalists get a warning; press freedoms halt in South Sudan.”

  1. Obama administration knew British government planned to force Guardian to destroy hard drives with Snowden docs: AP scores emails with a FOIA request. “‘Good news, at least on this front,’ the current NSA deputy director, Richard Ledgett, said at the end of a short, censored email to then-NSA director Gen. Keith Alexander and others. The subject of that July 19, 2013, email was: ‘Guardian data being destroyed.’” (AP) | FLASHBACK: Video of Guardian editors destroying hard drives while technicians from the Brtitish intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) watched. (The Guardian)
  2. More Canadian papers close: Torstar’s Star Media Group will close Metro papers in Regina, Saskatchewan; Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and London, Ontario.
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Glenn Greenwald returns, Daily Mail removes Clooney story

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. U.S. officials warned Muslims about Greenwald story: Glenn Greenwald and Murtaza Hussain reported in a piece published early Wednesday that the FBI and NSA have “covertly monitored the emails of prominent Muslim-Americans.” Prior to publication, they write, Justice Department officials “were reaching out to Muslim-American leaders across the country to warn them that the piece would contain errors and misrepresentations, even though it had not yet been written.” (The Intercept) | The authors will discuss the story on Reddit. (@ggreenwald)
  2. New Yorker plans changes to paywall: All articles will be available free for three months starting July 21, then it plans to charge “its most avid readers through a subscription plan.” (NYT)
  3. BuzzFeed reporter “would suck” at clickbait: BuzzFeed “hired me because they want me to do what I’ve done before: big investigative projects,” Chris Hamby writes in an AMA.
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Daily Mail removes story after George Clooney calls it false, ‘dangerous’

USA Today | The Guardian

Mail Online has removed a story that the actor George Clooney wrote about for USA Today. He said the story, involving his planned marriage to Amal Alamuddin, was “completely fabricated.”

The July 7 Mail Online article by Hannah Roberts and Sara Nathan said Alamuddin is a member of the “Druze sect, a medieval offshoot of Islam, who are forbidden to marry outsiders.” The Mail reporters wrote that “There can be harsh penalties for those Druze who marry outsiders” and that Alamuddin’s mother objects to the marriage on religious grounds.

Clooney in 2013. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Clooney in 2013. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

Alamuddin’s mother is not Druze, Clooney noted in his piece.

Other news outlets have picked up the story, including the New York Daily News and Boston.com (which embedded an E! story about the Mail’s story).

Clooney wrote that he was less concerned about the inaccuracies than the Mail’s apparent intention to “exploit religious differences where none exist,” which he says is “at the very least negligent and more appropriately dangerous.” He continued:

We have family members all over the world, and the idea that someone would inflame any part of that world for the sole reason of selling papers should be criminal.

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News Corp calls Daily Mail Australia ‘copy snatchers and parasites’

Today’s MediaWireWorld roundup of journalism news from outside the U.S. Send tips to Kristen Hare: khare@poynter.org

Australia

News Corp Australia called reporters with Daily Mail Australia “copy snatchers and parasites,” Amanda Meade reported Monday in The Guardian. Meade reported that News Corp sent a letter to the recently rebranded organization (formerly known just as Mail Online) threatening a lawsuit if it doesn’t stop lifting copy.

One of the exclusive stories News has accused the Daily Mail of copying is a feature about “the best dress a woman can own”, which reportedly took six Daily Telegraph journalists, including a fashion editor with 20 years’ experience, to produce.

Daily Mail Australia sources called the whole thing “ludicrous.” Since it launched, Meade reported, the new site has 2.18 million unique visits a month “and it now ranks sixth in Australian news websites, according to Nielsen.” Read more

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Daily Mail apologizes to J.K. Rowling in classic Daily Mail style

The Guardian

Apologies from the Daily Mail are usually entertaining, a little puzzling, maybe alarming and sometimes not really apologies at all. It issued another on Wednesday, running an apology to J.K. Rowling on the bottom of page 2, Roy Greenslade reported in The Guardian. The newspaper admitted liability in January for a 2013 story pitting the “Harry Potter” author against fellow church members.

“Our September 28, 2013 article ‘How JK’s sob story about her single mother past surprised and confused the church members who cared for her’ suggested that JK Rowling made a knowingly false and inexcusable claim in an article for the Gingerbread charity that people at her church had stigmatised her and cruelly taunted her for being a single mother.

In fact Mrs Rowling recounted only one incident where a visitor to the church sitgmatised and taunted her on a particular day. We accept that Ms Rowling’s article did not contain any false claims and apologise for any contrary suggestion and have agreed to pay substantial damages to Ms Rowling, which she is donating to charity, and a contribution to her legal costs.”

Rowling, flanked by Death Eaters, in 2010.
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Economist senior editor Edward Lucas left a comment on National Journal’s story about a Daily Mail article he wrote regarding Ukrainian politician Yulia Tymoshenko’s “undeniable sexual magnetism.” In the comment, Lucas didn’t speak highly of The Daily Mail, Joe Coscarelli writes:

Asked to confirm he left the comment, Lucas told Daily Intelligencer, “It is my writing. I make no secret of my disagreement with the Daily Mail on lots of issues…. But if I wrote only for papers I agreed with, I would have much less chance of promoting the ideas I care about.” …

“The money is good, but the real point is impact,” Lucas added when asked if the decision to write for a publication he thinks so low of was financial in nature. “I reach 3 [million] people via the Daily Mail and if I can disabuse them of even a few of their misapprehensions, it’s worth it. For the same reason I accept invites to go on Fox and Glenn Beck.”

Joe Coscarelli, New York

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Daily Mail rips off Yahoo News story, then updates with ‘credit’

The (U.K.) Daily Mail lifted several paragraphs from a Yahoo News account of a speech by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. It later updated the story with a credit to Yahoo.

The Yahoo story, written by Chris Moody, was published at approximately 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, while the unbylined Daily Mail piece was published at 6:01 p.m. on Tuesday and updated at 12:23 p.m. Wednesday.

While several sections paraphrased Moody’s story, several were outright rips, as the screenshots below show.

From Yahoo:

Speaking at Palm Beach Atlantic University in West Palm Beach, Fla., Thomas, the second black justice to serve on the court, lamented what he considers a society that is more “conscious” of racial differences than it was when he grew up in segregated Georgia in the days before — and during — the civil rights era.

From the Daily Mail:

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Daily Mail removes story after J.K. Rowling sues for libel

The Guardian | PressGazette

J.K. Rowling has sued The Daily Mail for libel over a September 2013 story entitled “How JK Rowling’s sob story about her past as a single mother has left the churchgoers who cared for her upset and bewildered,” according to a story Friday by Roy Greenslade in The Guardian.

According to Greenslade, Rowling’s lawyers “say the article meant that that she had ‘falsely and inexcusably accused her fellow churchgoers of behaving in a bigoted, unchristian manner towards her, of stigmatising her and cruelly taunting her for being a single mother.’”

Rowling in 2012 (Photo by Dan Hallman/Invision/AP)

Rowling believes the Mail story was “premised on a false picture” of her own article published 10 days before on the website for the single parents’ charity, Gingerbread, “I am prouder of my years as a single mother than of any other part of my life”. Rowling is president of Gingerbread.

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The Daily Mail corrects a report that wrongly claimed a father was jailed for sending a happy birthday message to his son on Facebook:

An article on June 1 reported that a father had been jailed in a secret court hearing for breaching a court order by wishing his grown up son happy birthday on Facebook. We accept that although no press were present and there were no public listings of the hearing, it was not meant to be secret and the father was actually jailed for failing to abide by court orders requiring him to remove particular references to his children from the internet. We apologise for suggesting otherwise.

Daily Mail

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