Articles about "Dean Baquet"


University of Georgia j-school rescinds invitation to Liberian journalist

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. University of Georgia panics, rescinds invitation to Liberian journalist: It canceled Wade C.L. Williams‘ invitation to speak Oct. 23. “It just became abundantly clear we had a risk scenario and a situation on our hands that was a little more sensitive issue,” Grady College dean Charles N. Davis tells Brad Schrade. (Atlanta Journal-Constitution) | Williams: “A woman with a pleasant voice delicately told me that parents were panicking and the general public was against my coming to the university.” (FrontPageAfrica) | What sort of lecture was UGA planning? “Ebola in humans is spread only through direct contact with virus-laden bodily fluids, and is not as transmissible as such airborne viruses as influenza and measles.” (WP) | Related: Why Guardian journalist Monica Mark decided not to wear a hazmat suit while reporting on Ebola: “It’s really difficult to get someone to open up to when you’re wearing it.” (IBT)
  2. The ethics of the Guardian’s Whisper scoop: Was it OK for it to report on something it learned during a meeting about a potential partnership?
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bitcoinfeatured

Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog.
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The ‘One-Page Magazine’ is toast

mediawiremorningGood morning from Chicago, where the Poynter dot org crew is attending the 2014 Online News Association Conference. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ESPN benches Bill Simmons: The talking head and Grantland boss said on a podcast that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was a “liar” and “has no integrity whatsoever.” ESPN has removed the podcast. (NYT) | Richard Deitsch: “ESPN management is looking to become more decisive with suspensions when its employees go off the rails.” (SI)
  2. Forbes zaps contributor after stupid article: Bill Frezza‘s article “Drunk Female Guests Are the Gravest Threat To Fraternities” “was removed from Forbes.com almost immediately after he published it,” a Forbes spox tells Philip Caulfield. “Mr. Frezza is no longer a contributor to Forbes.com.” Frezza: “I stand by every word I wrote.” (NYDN) | Jessica Roy: “Only when we tackle the menace of drunk girls, who are absolutely getting themselves drunk while the sober brothers lock themselves in their rooms and study, can the fraternity system be restored to its rightful glory.” (NY Mag)
  3. NPR kills Robert Krulwich’s blog: “I can’t pretend.
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Baquet changes NYT masthead: ‘our newsroom must be more nimble’

The New York Times

New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet made changes to the publication’s masthead today, promoting four people to the post of deputy executive editor and eliminating the position of managing editor.

Susan Chira will be in charge of the news report, Ravi Somaiya reports. Janet Elder “will manage talent, operations and budget.” Matt Purdy will run investigations and enterprise. Ian Fisher’s in charge of digital operations. Tom Bodkin is creative director. And three other editors got promotions: Joseph Kahn is assistant editor for international; Steve Duenes is assistant editor, and NYT Now editor Clifford J. Levy is an associate editor.

Joe Pompeo reported these changes were coming last Thursday.

Here’s Baquet’s note to staff:

As I thought about the kind of leadership The New York Times will need in these next crucial two or three years —as we grow our digital muscles while maintaining our commitment to the majesty of print — it became clear that our traditional masthead structure no longer works.

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3 Journalists killed while covering Ebola crisis

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Journalists killed while covering Ebola crisis: A delegation including government officials, doctors and journalists was attacked in a Guinean village Tuesday. Eight people were killed. (LAT) | Three journalists are among the dead. (Reuters) | “Many residents of rural villages have reacted with fear and panic when outsiders have come to conduct awareness campaigns and have even attacked health clinics.” (AP) | “How journalists covering the Ebola outbreak try to stay safe” (Poynter) | “While reporting on Ebola, the smell of chlorine ‘is one of the most comforting smells in the world’” (Poynter) | Kristen Hare‘s Twitter list of reporters covering the Ebola outbreak.
  2. Turkey tussles with the Times: The NYT published a correction on a Sept. 16 story about ISIS getting recruits from Turkey: “A picture with an earlier version of this article, which showed President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu leaving a mosque in August, was published in error.
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Susan Glasser

Susan Glasser is Politico’s new editor

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Politico gets a new boss: Politico Magazine Editor Susan Glasser is now the editor of Politico, Dylan Byers reports. John Harris will remain editor-in-chief. “She will appoint a new Executive Editor to oversee day-to-day newsroom operations, the leadership said. That person will replace Rick Berke, who resigned earlier this month.” (Politico) | Glasser will still oversee Politico Magazine, but will hire some senior editors in the next weeks. “Susan has plans to sharpen the editorial structure, bring in even more talent, upgrade our digital properties and bring more clarity and efficiency — and individual ownership — to our workflow,” CEO Jim VandeHei says in a memo to staff. | “One of the issues that led to Mr. Berke’s resignation, according to people with knowledge of the situation, was his lack of authority to make the moves he thought necessary, including autonomy over staffing — precisely the power Ms.
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Dean Baquet

Dean Baquet has malignant tumor removed

The New York Times

New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet “had a malignant tumor removed from his kidney on Saturday and will spend about a week away from the office while recovering,” Ravi Somaiya reports in the Times.

Doctors discovered the tumor on Thursday, Mr. Baquet said, and felt that it required “immediate attention.” He had “minimally invasive, completely successful surgery,” he said, “and my doctors have given me an excellent prognosis.”

Here’s the email Baquet sent to staff Monday: Read more

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Dean Baquet is now ‘much more skeptical’ about government claims of harm

NPR | The Intercept

New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet told David Folkenflik it was “really painful” to lose the Edward Snowden scoops to The Guardian and The Washington Post. Snowden’s decision to take the documents to those outlets “was the bitter harvest of seeds sown by the Times almost a decade ago,” Folkenflik writes:

In the fall of 2004, just ahead of the November general elections, the Times’ news leadership spiked an exclusive from Washington correspondents James Risen and Eric Lichtblau, disclosing massive warrantless domestic eavesdropping by the NSA.

White House officials had warned that the results of such a story could be catastrophic.

The Times, in a decision led by then-Washington Bureau Chief Philip Taubman and then-Executive Editor Bill Keller, quashed the story, despite the objections of the two reporters, their editor Rebecca Corbett, and several of their colleagues.

“I am much, much, much more skeptical of the government’s entreaties not to publish today than I was ever before,” Baquet said. Read more

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Stop fetishizing nasty editors, Dean Baquet says

NPR

In an interview with NPR’s David Folkenflik, New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet says he never gave Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr. an ultimatum about now-former Executive Editor Jill Abramson. He also talks a little bit about management style.

“I’m not commenting on Jill’s relationship with the newsroom or management style. I’ll let others do that,” Baquet said. “But one thing that people say is newspapers always have tough [leaders]. I mean I’ve seen many elegies to ‘the city editor who changed my life because he was really nasty to me for six months and it made me a better person.’ I think that’s nuts.”

He added, “I don’t think that leaders have to be or should be rough on their people. Leaders have to make tough decisions.”

Earlier this week, former (Greensboro, North Carolina) News & Record Editor John Robinson tweeted something along those lines, bouncing off a Jim Romenesko post about a tough editor. Read more

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Vanity Fair: Baquet’s ‘ultimatum of sorts’ led to Abramson ouster

Vanity Fair

New York Times Co. CEO Mark Thompson, Times Publisher Arthur Sulzberger Jr and then Executive Editor Jill Abramson were all “actively recruiting” Guardian U.S. Editor-in-Chief Janine Gibson to a top digital role, Sulzberger says in an interview with Sarah Ellison in Vanity Fair.

Sulzberger calls the events around that hire “the wave.” Dean Baquet, then the newspaper’s managing editor, didn’t know Gibson “was being recruited for a job equal to his own,” she writes. At a lunch, “When Janine told Dean that she’d been offered the job of co-managing editor, he didn’t have a clue,” Sulzberger told Elllison. The story continues:

Baquet reportedly betrayed no irritation during his lunch with Gibson. But two days later, on Wednesday, May 7, he and Sulzberger had dinner. At that dinner, “I learned the severity of his feelings,” Sulzberger said, which I took to mean that Baquet gave Sulzberger an ultimatum of sorts.

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