Articles about "Editorial cartooning"


James Foley

U.S. tried to rescue James Foley

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The U.S. tried to rescue James Foley, and it declined to pay ransom: Islamic State “pressed the United States to provide a multimillion-dollar ransom for his release,” Rukmini Callimachi reports. Unlike many European countries, the U.S. and Britain will not pay ransoms for hostages. The terror group holds other Americans, including Time freelancer Steven J. Sotloff. (NYT) | David Rohde: “The divergent U.S. and European approach to abductions fails to deter captors or consistently safeguard victims.” (Reuters) | Administration officials yesterday confirmed that U.S. Special Operations forces tried to rescue Foley, but the op “was not ultimately successful because the hostages were not present . . . at the site of the operation.” (WP) | Media blackouts “don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages,” James Harkin writes. “There are arguments for and against such blackouts, and there have been lively debates among the families of the missing about their strategic value, but in principle they seem inimical to the spirit of journalism—and potentially counterproductive.” (Vanity Fair) | “Many of those taken captive have been freelance journalists hoping to carve out careers by reporting where others had feared to tread,” Ravi Somaiya and Christine Haughney report. Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron “said that The Post now uses only contracted freelancers, so it can provide them the same equipment, security and communications technology that staff reporters get.” (NYT) | French journalist Nicolas Henin, who was held with Foley but released “said Foley had faced particular abuse from their jailers because he was American and his brother is in the US air force.” (AFP)
  2. How to handle the images of Foley’s death? Jack Shafer: “More likely, the videos, which our Western eyes tell us are staged for our benefit, are really aimed at the video-makers’ constituents to attract maximum attention, showcase the groups’ power, attract recruits, and build cadres – all things that the video may actually do.” (Reuters) | James Ball: “To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.” (The Guardian) | Mathew Ingram: “A number of people had their [Twitter] accounts suspended after they shared the images, including Zaid Benjamin of Radio Sawa, but media outlets that posted photos did not.” (Gigaom)
  3. The guns of Ferguson: Police officer suspended for aiming gun at protesters, telling them he’d kill them. (WP) | Watch the video of #OfficerGoFuckYourself (The Wire) | NPPA filed a formal complaint with three Missouri police forces, asking for a formal investigation into an incident where photojournalist Raffe Lazarian asked a policeman “which way do I need to go in order to get to the media area?” In reply, NPPA General Counsel Mickey H. Osterreicher writes, “the officer drew his weapon and pointed it at Mr. Lazarian in a threatening manner and then used it to gesture in the direction he wanted him to go.” (Scribd) | “In a life-and-death situation, like when armed rioters are firing at police from the apartments behind the emblematic, burned-out QuikTrip in Ferguson, how can police tell once and for all who is a journalist and who isn’t?” (Riverfront Times) || MUSICIANS GET INVOLVED: Nelly spoke with Eric Holder. (NBC News) | Killer Mike and Talib Kweli talked about Ferguson on TV. (BuzzFeed) || Bloomberg Businessweek cover: “Race, Class, and The Future of Ferguson.” (@BW) | Time cover: “The Tragedy of Ferguson” (@neetzan)
  4. Poynter’s Kristen Hare is in Ferguson again today: She filed vignettes yesterday (longer piece TK) on the Post-Dispatch’s morning meeting, St. Louis Public Radio, Boston Globe reporter Akilah Johnson and local videojournalist John Miller. | Follow her on Twitter, and you’ll see plenty of pics of her turning the camera around on the media, like this photo of Wesley Lowery, Ryan Reilly and Alex Altman working in the Ferguson McDonald’s.
  5. Huffington Post will keep covering Ferguson after the circus leaves town: “With reader support, we’ll hire a local citizen journalist who’s been covering the turmoil and train her to become a professional journalist,” Ryan Grim writes. (HuffPost)
  6. How cable news covered Ferguson: “MSNBC devoted far more time to the story than its top competitors Fox News and CNN. … Our previous analysis of the 2012 killing of Trayvon Martin, another news story with strong racial undertones involving the shooting death of a black teen in Florida, found similar treatment by the three cable channels.” (Pew)
  7. Gatehouse parent company’s stock rises: Rise follows a Seeking Alpha post by VJ Shil that “rattled off a bunch of promising attributes: a nice dividend, an appealing acquisition pipeline, strong loyalty to local newspapers among small-town residents, the shedding of GateHouse’s massive mountain of debt through a recent bankruptcy.” (Boston Business Journal)
  8. Could Vox’s Chorus become a platform? Lockhart Steele: “perhaps Chorus should become a tool for more than just those of us employed at Vox Media, and a platform that transcends words in the ways that Vox Media has long since transcended just being a collection of websites? | FREEKY FLASHBACK: A pre-post-text Felix Salmon sang Chorus’ praises last year. (Reuters) | “Platisher”-coiner Jonathan Glick: “Not going to say it.” (@jonathanglick)
  9. Chicago Tribune cartoonist “doesn’t mind confounding readers”: “When a cartoonist chooses sides ‘you’re not engaging anyone,” Joe Fournier tells Michael Miner. “You’re just appeasing the side you’re committed to. It confuses the hell out of people when I don’t choose a side.” (Chicago Reader)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Cassie Heiter is a meteorologist at KWTV in Oklahoma City. Previously, she was a meteorologist at WQAD in Moline, Illinois. (Lacey Swope) | Matt Brickman and Kim Johnson will join WCCO 4 News This Morning in Minneapolis. Brickman currently gives weather forecasts on Saturday mornings. Johnson is currently an anchor on Saturday mornings. (CBS Minnesota) | Dan Wilson will be news director for WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida. Previously, he was interim news director there. (FTV Live) | Shellene Cockrell is now a morning anchor for KOAA in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Previously, she was a reporter for KWGN in Denver. (Colorado Springs Gazette) | Craig Melvin will be a national correspondent for the “Today Show”. Previously, he had been anchoring for MSNBC on the weekends. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: The Hill is looking for technology and cyber security reporters. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Cartoonist brings the Charlotte Observer its first win in 26 years

Siers’ self-drawn Twitter picture.

Kevin Siers daydreamed and drew through school, doodling as he listened. Then, in the fifth grade, he and his teacher had a talk.

“And he just took me aside and said, look, I want you to make me some comic books,” Siers said in a phone interview with Poynter.

So Siers created a superhero knockoff. The winner of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning didn’t launch into the local newspaper from there, though. Siers went to work in the ore mines after high school in Biwabik, Minn. But while there, Mark Washburn wrote on Monday for the Observer, he submitted a cartoon to The Biwabik Times. From the Observer:

“So I said, I guess I could do this,” Siers said.

When he returned to the university, he began doing editorial cartoons for the campus newspaper, the Minnesota Daily. He got to know Steve Sack, political cartoonist for the Minneapolis Star Tribune and last year’s Pulitzer winner for editorial cartoons.

“Sack was my mentor,” Siers said. “He’d take me out to lunch and show me grown-up cartoonist tricks.”

Siers has been with the Observer since 1987, said Taylor Batten, editorial page editor, in a phone interview with Poynter. Batten said Siers is a voracious reader who doesn’t just read headlines and throw something together, but he approaches his work with knowledge and background.

“He’s a journalist first and a journalist who expresses his ideas through cartoons,” Batten said. Read more

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Dr. Seuss’ career as an editorial cartoonist stays hidden in Cincinnati

An early Seuss cartoon from the Cincinnati Art Museum

CityBeat

Cincinnati Art Museum has five editorial cartoons from Theodore Seuss Geisel, but you can’t see them, Bill Sloat reported Wednesday for CityBeat.

The Seuss is not loose at the Cincinnati Art Museum, which has a stash of the good doctor’s political cartoons filed away and unavailable for public viewing in its archives.

The five cartoons were drawn for a New York newspaper’s editorial page and appeared years before Horton heard any Whos. These works date to the days when Nazis were heiling Herr Hitler. And most of the world was giving a deaf ear to the destruction of Jews that we now call the Holocaust.

Seuss was just starting the trajectory that would make him a household name. Sadly, most Cincinnatians have no opportunity for appreciation and leisurely examination of this early work. They can’t see this chapter, the one that is virtually unknown.

Sloat reports that the museum hasn’t shown the five cartoons since 1991. Read more

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New Yorker accepts less than 2 percent of cartoons it receives, editor says

New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff talked about rejection and humor writing in a recent TED talk. Of the 1,000 cartoons the New Yorker gets each week, only 16 or 17 are accepted, Mankoff said.

If you want to see some of the cartoons the New Yorker has rejected over the years, check out Matthew Diffee’s book, “The Best of the Rejection Collection.”

Hat tip to GalleyCat. Read more

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SacBee’s Jack Ohman won’t apologize for Texas explosion cartoon

Sacramento Bee | Fox News

Sacramento Bee editorial cartoonist Jack Ohman has refused to apologize for an editorial cartoon berating loose business regulations in Texas that potentially led to the April 17 explosion of a fertilizer plant in the town of West, killing at least 14 people and injuring as many as 200 others.

Ohman wrote on his blog that he had received many complaints calling it (and him) “insensitive and tasteless” and pointed out he had drawn much more graphic images in the past to make his points.

I knew it was close to the edge, but I went with it, and I don’t go with things I can’t defend. I’m defending this one because I think that when you have a politician traveling across the country selling a state with low regulatory capacity, that politician also has to be accountable for what happens when that lack of regulation proves to be fatal.

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Bill Day recycling stirs talk of plagiarism in editorial cartoons

The Daily Cartoonist | That Cartoon Critic | Matt Bors
Bill Day used another illustrator’s work without attribution in a recent cartoon, Alan Gardner writes. Videogame developer Zack Fowler’s image of a rifle landed in a Day cartoon about the power of the NRA.
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Toronto Star apologizes for cartoon that ‘fed into racial stereotypes’

The Toronto Star | Michael de Adder | Sabrina Scott
The Toronto Star apologized for a Michael de Adder cartoon, saying many readers thought it “fed into racial stereotypes at a time when emotions were running particularly high.” (Don’t just take their word for it; read some letters.)

The cartoon was published last Wednesday and followed a local July 16 shooting in which two people were killed and 23 more, including a toddler, were injured. De Adder’s cartoon portrayed a black toddler with the legend “Injuries to expect before they are two” and “Head laceration from a medium-caliber bullet” among less sinister harms.

On his blog, de Adder describes how he constructed the cartoon and shows his drafts. His intentions, he writes, weren’t racist:

Many things affected me about this tragedy, but the bullet injury to the 22-month old girl struck a cord. I have kids. The worst thing they ever suffered was a scrape to the knee.

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Rex Babin, Sacramento Bee editorial cartoonist, dies of cancer

The Daily Cartoonist | The Sacramento Bee
Rex Babin, a 2003 Pulitzer finalist for editorial cartooning, died Friday morning at the age of 49 “after a long struggle with stomach cancer,” reports the Bee’s Anita Creamer. She recalls his work:

In Rex Babin’s perhaps most beloved editorial cartoon, huge hands reached down from on high to steady US Airways Flight 1549 as it floated on the Hudson River, passengers standing on its wings. …

“That cartoon resonated with people on the flight,” said his wife, Kathleen. “He heard from many of the passengers and crew, and he presented it to Captain Sullenberger when he was in Sacramento. The reaction was amazing.

“But he liked the ones that stirred up controversy. He was proud of doing that.”

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Cleveland Plain Dealer readers confused by decision to pull Non Sequitur comic

The Plain Dealer decided not to publish a Non Sequitur comic Friday that depicts a bunny looking at a police lineup of other animals and saying, “They all really do look alike to me.” In its place was an editor’s note that said the strip “was deemed objectionable.” Art Costanzo, 63, a self-professed lifetime reader of the paper, writes in a letter to the editor, “The only thing I found controversial was the fact that you did not publish it.”

The paper left a blank spot where this strip would have appeared, along with an editor’s note.
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I’ve been thinking I wanted to try something bigger. It’s an amicable parting with Hearst, and I wish everyone the best. Pi.com is trying to do something new with a small but talented staff, and is still trying to sort out what works best. … I’ll move on to LA and they’ll move on to wherever it is they’re going.

Pulitzer-winning cartoonist David Horsey tells Seattle Weekly about his move to the LA Times

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