Articles about "Edward Snowden"


That time Ben Bradlee thanked Richard Nixon

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Remembering Ben Bradlee on Twitter: Carlos Lozada, The Washington Post’s incoming nonfiction book critic, began tweeting passages from Ben Bradlee‘s memoir, “A Good Life,” after the former Post executive editor died Tuesday. (@CarlosLozadaWP) | 196 or so tweets later, here’s a selection: “It would be ungrateful of me not to pause here and acknowledge the role of Richard Milhouse Nixon in furthering my career.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “Make no mistake about it: there is only one thing an editor must have to be a good editor, and that is a good owner.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “When a job candidate came in with good clips but was soft spoken and reticent, #Bradlee’s verdict: ‘Ehhh. Nothing clanks when he walks.’” (@CarlosLozadaWP)
  2. More Bradlee: Here’s a long video interview he did with Poynter in 1986. (Poynter) | Don Graham: “I would like to tell you why we all loved Ben Bradlee so much — loved working for him, loved working with him — and why we felt he could make anything possible.” (WP) | Jill Abramson: “One of the sadnesses of my career is that I never worked for him.” (Time) | David Remnick: The “most overstated notion about Bradlee was the idea that he was an ideological man.” (The New Yorker) | David Carr: “By some estimations, including his own, his most enduring accomplishment had nothing to do with the Pentagon Papers or Watergate. … In 1969, he conjured Style, a hip, cheeky section of the newspaper that reflected the tumult of the times in a city where fashion and discourse were rived with a maddening sameness.” (NYT) | Mark Athitakis: “At the risk of being a pedant, WaPo has an ‘ironclad rule’ for obits that nobody dies of ‘natural causes’… but Ben Bradlee, the Post reports, died of ‘natural causes.’” (@mathitak) | Newsweek will run some of his articles for that magazine today. (@Newsweek) | OK, one more Lozada tweet: “In the Washington bureau of Newsweek, even one’s most beautiful prose was rewritten by some faceless bastard in New York.” (@CarlosLozadaWP)
  3. Brian Stelter vs. Rush Limbaugh vs. Brian Stelter: “If Limbaugh really thinks he knows what’s in the president’s head, if he really thinks people ‘at the highest levels of government’ believe in some diseased form of payback for slavery, he should defend this thinking — not hide behind a three-week-old sound bite from a CNN guest.” (CNN)
  4. Colorado county decides newspaper ruling was incorrect: Larimer County Clerk and Recorder Angela Myers reversed an order that said Colorado State University’s newspaper, The Rocky Mountain Collegian, couldn’t be placed near a polling place. (The Denver Post) | “‘It’s the law that you’re not supposed to have electioneering materials in that area, and I am the enforcer of that,’ Myers said.” (The Rocky Mountain Collegian)
  5. Maybe Edward Snowden’s biggest contribution to journalism: He insisted reporters in contact with him use encryption. “Snowden has now provided a highly visible example of how, in a very high-stakes situation, encryption can, at a minimum, create time and space for independent journalistic decision-making about what to publish and why,” Steve Coll writes. (The New Yorker)
  6. Why she left the news: “I’m tired of jockeying for position in a profession that never hesitates to finger ‘racists’ in public, but can’t see the very real racism in its own newsrooms,” Rebecca Carroll writes. (The New Republic)
  7. NBC News freelancer declared free of Ebola: Ashoka Mukpo announced he was in the clear on Twitter. (USA Today) | “be on the lookout for the Ebola Diaries blog coming soon. Will compile material from long-term reporter residents of Liberia” (@unkyoka)
  8. How the West might be won: The California Sunday Magazine’s plans for nailing down the left coast’s lean-back reading hours. (CJR)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Bradlee on the Post’s front page: “An editor of legendary impact.”. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Joe Weisenthal will host a TV show and develop a market-focused website for Bloomberg. He is executive editor at Business Insider. (Business Insider) | Ashkan Soltani will be chief technologist at the Federal Trade Commission. Previously, he was an independent privacy researcher who helped The Washington Post cover the National Security Agency. (WP) | Mick Greenwood is head of video at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was managing editor of video at MSN. Richard Giddings is now head of mobile at Time Inc. UK. Previously, he was digital editions program manager there. (Time Inc.) | Job of the day: Vice News is looking for an associate producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine. “As a health professional I know that we have no symptoms and pose no risk to the public, but I am deeply sorry for the concerns this episode caused.” (THR) | The freelance cameraman who contracted Ebola and is recovering, Ashoka Mukpo, tweeted his “endless gratitude for the good vibes.” (NBC News) | Ebola-related: The New York Post fronts the Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola — and her dog. (New York Post) | Bentley “is being held in isolation and watched closely, but it is unlikely that he will have to be euthanized, Dallas city officials said.” (Mashable)
     


     

  3. Christie and Clinton overkill? Since Jan. 1, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was been the most-mentioned potential Republican presidential contender, according to a LexisNexis search of 15 top newspapers, with Mitt Romney, Ted Cruz and Rand Paul not far behind. Hillary Clinton, of course, is the most-referenced Democrat — and it’s not close at all. “Overall, more stories have talked about potential GOP candidates (202) than Democratic ones (115).” (Pew Research Center)
  4. Kushner no longer OC Register’s publisher: New publisher and CEO Richard Mirman takes over for the beleaguered Aaron Kushner, who remains CEO of Freedom Communications, which owns the newspaper. Mirman is an investor in the Register. (Orange County Register) | Previously: The Los Angeles Register closed last month after just five months of operation (Poynter), and the Register reportedly owes the Los Angeles Times $3.5 million in distribution fees. (OC Weekly)
  5. Rift between Guardian and NYT? When The Guardian’s hard drives were being smashed by British authorities in 2013, the newspaper arranged for The New York Times to share and protect some of its Snowden documents. But now, Lloyd Grove reports, some Times editors are frustrated with The Guardian’s “total control over the Snowden cache, including how and when it can be used to develop, pursue and publish investigations.” Counters Times executive editor Dean Baquet: “I don’t feel held captive by The Guardian, because I wouldn’t have access to these particular documents without The Guardian.” (The Daily Beast)
  6. White House’s Secret Service spin: “White House reporters are often too swamped to fully check out every assertion made by the White House’s press operation, and in this case officials seized on a phrase that is in the report. The report is rather complicated and someone reading quickly might not catch the nuance that this was not actually a finding, but merely a claim made by, among others, by the very person whose credibility is questioned throughout the report.” (Washington Post)
  7. BBC looks at “hybrid” broadcast-Internet radio on phones: “Nearly two thirds of the mobile phone owners surveyed found the idea of hybrid radio appealing and said it could be a deciding factor when faced with a choice between phones with similar specs.” (BBC)
  8. Not front page of the day: A story on A1 of some editions of The New York Times today is missing a byline and lede.
     


     

  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Times-Journal of Fort Payne, Alabama, with a very not-lifesize picture of Ebola (Courtesy the Newseum).
     
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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Betsy Woodruff will be a politics writer for Slate. She’s currently a politics writer at the Washington Examiner. ‏(@woodruffbets) | Carlos Lozada will be a nonfiction book critic at The Washington Post. Previously, he edited Outlook there. (Washington Post) | Josef Federman is now Jerusalem bureau chief for The Associated Press. Previously, he was a news editor at the AP. (AP) | Chris Carter is now digital services sales director for The Alliance for Audited Media. Previously, he was director of business development for DG Interactive. (AAM) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for a photo editor. Get your résumés in! (AP) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden. (Wired)
  3. Gawker covers BuzzFeed: BuzzFeed has removed nearly 5,000 old posts, some of which “clearly veered into plagiarism territory,” J.K. Trotter writes. (Gawker) | Yowch: “BuzzFeed divorces its first wife.” (@pbump) | Kelly McBride: “Taking articles down is a rare phenomenon among trustworthy institutions, and it should be executed in the full light of day.” (Poynter)
  4. BuzzFeed covers Gawker: In response to staff complaints about violent porn posted in comments, Gawker Media banned images from its Kinja platform. Kinja, Myles Tanzer reports, “is still mystifying employees and creating tensions between the company’s editorial staff and top executives.” (BuzzFeed) | Jezebel EIC Jessica Coen calls the image-banning move an insufficient “temporary band-aid.” (Poynter) | Nicholas Jackson suggests Gawker Media should “Shut down Kinja completely.” (It’s important to note here that Kinja is also Gawker Media’s CMS.) Comments, he writes, “just don’t belong at the end of or alongside posts … They belong on personal blogs, or on Twitter or Tumblr or Reddit, where individuals build a full, searchable body of work and can be judged accordingly.” (Pacific Standard)
  5. Alt-weeklies benefit from Advance’s changes: Publishers of Willamette Week, Lagniappe and Syracuse New Times have staffed up and seen growth in the wake of changes at daily papers in their cities. (AAN) | Related: Readership, alliances up at other New Orleans news outlets in last year (Poynter)
  6. MoJo’s Facebook mojo: Mother Jones engagement editor Ben Dreyfuss decided to “double down on Facebook,” Caroline O’Donovan writes, and has seen notable returns. “From what we hear, Facebook is privileging certain kinds of content-rich sites,” MoJo publisher Steve Katz says. (Nieman) | Related: “While many people now find their news on Facebook, it’s easy to forget that very recently they found it on Google, and will surely find it somewhere else in the not-too-distant future.” (NYT) | Also related: Facebook has seen many more publishers embed its posts since it launched FB Newswire. (Poynter)
  7. More BS television: Bill Simmons plans to launch “The Grantland Basketball Show” on ESPN. (The Big Lead)
  8. Journalists injured in Iraq: New York Times reporter Alissa J. Rubin, Adam Ferguson, a photographer freelancing for the Times, and Moises Saman, who was on assignment for Time, were injured in a helicopter crash in northern Iraq Tuesday. The pilot was killed. (NYT) | Saman’s pictures from the crash. (Time)
  9. Jobs still available in journalism: Dale Eisinger says he worked for “the New York office of a conservative media company based in the South,” where his charge was “to trawl Twitter, and the rest of the internet, for conspiracy and evidence of liberal malice. Then, to repackage these stories or posts or memes for the target demo.” (The Awl)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Adam Serwer will be national editor at BuzzFeed. Currently, he’s a reporter at MSNBC (Poynter) | Edith Zimmerman has been named senior staff writer for Matt Taibbi’s as yet unnamed magazine. She founded The Hairpin. Laura Dawn, former creative and cultural director for moveon.org, will be the magazine’s executive director of multimedia. (Poynter) | Dominic Rushe, Alex Needham and Oliver Laughland will each take different jobs at Guardian U.S. Rushe, a business correspondent, will be East Coast technology editor for Guardian U.S. Needham, formerly a culture editor for theguardian.com, will be arts editor for Guardian U.S. Laughland will join Guardian U.S. as a senior reporter. He’s currently a reporter for Guardian Australia. (The Guardian) | Jeanne Cummings will be head of operations for Bloomberg’s forthcoming politics vertical. Previously, she was a deputy editor at Bloomberg News. (Politico) | The Denver Post is looking for a features writer to cover food and lifestyle. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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Yet another NYT digital tier?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Another NYT subscription tier? Lucia Moses reports: “According to a survey sent to readers this week, the new offering would give users 30 articles a month for $8, over 45 percent lower than the current cheapest offering.” (Digiday) | The Times has also floated the prospect of a shorter print edition in a survey, Joe Pompeo reported last week. (Capital) | The launch of its most recent digital products “has been anything but smooth.” (Poynter) | Sam Kirkland shows you how to save money on your NYT sub. (Poynter)
  2. Edward Snowden to stay longer in Russia: He got a three-year residence permit, his lawyer says. He’ll be able to travel abroad. (RT)
  3. Crowdfunding campaign to buy Murdoch U.K. papers: A group called Let’s Own the News hopes to raise £100 million (about $168 million) to buy the Times of London and The Sunday Times. “And why should Murdoch sell?” Roy Greenslade asks. “Evidently, because he would like to take a step forward for our democracy and to rejuvenate his public image after the phone hacking scandal.” (The Guardian) | Meanwhile, back on Earth: Speaking in a conference call about 21st Century Fox’s fourth quarter results, honcho Rupert Murdoch said, “we have no plans to go out on the acquisition trail.” (Associated Press) | Fox’s revenue was up 17 percent in the quarter. (21st Century Fox) | Flashback: Remember the crowdfunding campaign to buy Tribune’s newspapers so the Koch brothers couldn’t? (Bloomberg)
  4. Gannett’s newest “newsroom of the future”: “Reporters will always gripe about their editors, but if you suggest to almost any of them that they are better off without one, they will laugh at you,” Steve Cavendish writes about the planned reductions coming to The Tennessean, which will eliminate some middle managers. (Nashville Scene) | Gannett last launched a “newsroom of the future” in 2006. (Poynter/Romenesko) | The other Gannett “beta” newsrooms planning to institute changes: The Asbury Park (New Jersey) Press, The Greenville (South Carolina) News, The Pensacola (Florida) News Journal, The Asheville (North Carolina) Citizen-Times. (Poynter)
  5. ABC, NBC swap executives: “Rachel Maddow Show” executive producer Bill Wolff will become executive producer of ABC’s “The View.” “In return for NBC letting Wolff break his current long-term deal with the Peacock Network,” Don Kaplan writes, “ABC has agreed to free ESPN’s top programmer, Jamie Horowitz, who now can join NBC as general manager of ‘Today.’” (NYDN)
  6. Jim Brady’s Philly site gets a new name: Au revoir, Brother.ly. Hello Billy Penn. (Capital) | Brady: “Some people asked whether the site was going to be only for ‘bros,’ and whether it would cover women as well. Honestly, we didn’t worry too much about that.” (Billy Penn) | “Our website sounds too manly. I KNOW! LET’S NAME IT AFTER A MAN INSTEAD!” (@tylrfishr)
  7. Minority journalism grads have a harder time finding jobs: The University of Georgia’s annual study of journalism and mass comm grads showed journalists of color were less likely than whites to find a job in their chosen field, Richard Prince reports. (Maynard Institute) | “In addition to a slight tightening of the job market, the survey shows that salaries and benefits have also stagnated.” (Pew) | Median starting salaries at consumer magazines fell sharply from last year’s survey. (Poynter) | “Reality: It’s based on 12-17 students” (@TWallack)
  8. Iranian media says Washington Post journalist is a spy: Among the “evidence” of Jason Rezaian‘s perfidy to appear in reports: He purportedly co-directed an Iranian “Happy” video and follows The Huffington Post on Twitter. “While the accusations in the articles against Rezaian appear far-fetched, they are a worrying sign that the cases could be used to further a domestic political issue.” (Al-Monitor) | Anthony Bourdain interviewed Rezaian and his wife, Yeganeh Salehi, not long before they were arrested. (The Washington Post)
  9. 6 strategies publishers can use to make money off events: “The Chattanooga Times Free Press, a private company in Tennessee’s fourth-largest city, earned well into the seven digits off of just 12 events, making ‘direct events revenue’ 11 percent of its retail revenue.” (API)
  10. InStyle will reveal its September cover on Snapchat: Yep. (SocialTimes)
  11. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Bryan Rackleff will be creative director at Storyful. Previously, he was digital creative director at Comedy Central. (@raju) | Steven Kotok, chief executive of Dennis U.S., will leave the company. (Capital New York) | Tyson Evans, New York Times deputy editor of interactive news, and Jonathan Galinsky, a manager of strategy, will join the paper’s newsroom strategy team, according to a memo from Arthur Gregg Sulzberger. (Romenesko) | William Kole has been named New England news editor for the Associated Press. Previously, he was AP’s New England bureau chief. (AP) | Tom Berman will be Central region editor for the AP. He was most recently the acting editor for the region. (AP) | Job of the day: The Press of Atlantic City is looking for a news reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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Edward Snowden is designing tools for journalists

The Guardian

Edward Snowden is using some of his time in Russia to design “encryption tools to help professionals such as journalists protect sources and data,” Alan Rusbridger and Ewen MacAskill write in The Guardian. They interviewed the NSA whistleblower in Moscow.

Snowden is “negotiating foundation funding for the project,” they write.

“Journalists have to be particularly conscious about any sort of network signalling, any sort of connection, any sort of licence-plate reading device that they pass on their way to a meeting point, any place they use their credit card, any place they take their phone, any email contact they have with the source because that very first contact, before encrypted communications are established, is enough to give it all away,” Snowden told them.

Journalists had to ensure they made not a single mistake or they would be placing sources at risk. The same duty applied to other professions, he said, calling for training and new standards “to make sure that we have mechanisms to ensure that the average member of our society can have a reasonable measure of faith in the skills of all the members of these professions.”

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Jill Abramson: Being first on a story is a ‘point of pride’

PRX | The Daily Beast

At a talk at the Chautauqua Institution Wednesday, an audience member asked former New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson why being first is “so important for the press.”

Abramson admitted she sometimes asks herself the same thing: “sometimes given the speed at which even a tweet gets picked up, sometimes I did say to myself why is it so darned important because everybody knows everything — the boom effect in the media is so immediate now and so loud,” she said.

But: “again being candid with you, it’s kind of a point of pride.” Read more

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Dean Baquet is now ‘much more skeptical’ about government claims of harm

NPR | The Intercept

New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet told David Folkenflik it was “really painful” to lose the Edward Snowden scoops to The Guardian and The Washington Post. Snowden’s decision to take the documents to those outlets “was the bitter harvest of seeds sown by the Times almost a decade ago,” Folkenflik writes:

In the fall of 2004, just ahead of the November general elections, the Times’ news leadership spiked an exclusive from Washington correspondents James Risen and Eric Lichtblau, disclosing massive warrantless domestic eavesdropping by the NSA.

White House officials had warned that the results of such a story could be catastrophic.

The Times, in a decision led by then-Washington Bureau Chief Philip Taubman and then-Executive Editor Bill Keller, quashed the story, despite the objections of the two reporters, their editor Rebecca Corbett, and several of their colleagues.

“I am much, much, much more skeptical of the government’s entreaties not to publish today than I was ever before,” Baquet said.

Glenn Greenwald writes that the Snowden revelations occasioned a “desperately needed debate about journalism itself, and the proper relationship of journalists to those who wield political and economic power.” He’s encouraged by Baquet’s words, but wary.

“As is always the case, the stream of fear-mongering and alarmist warnings issued by the US Government to demonize a whistleblower proves to be false and without any basis, and the same is true for accusations made about the revelations themselves,” Greenwald writes. “But none of that has stopped countless US journalists from mindlessly citing each one of the latest evidence-free official claims as sacred fact.”

Greenwald notes Baquet once killed an NSA story, when he ran the Los Angeles Times. It was about “‘secret NSA rooms’ being installed at an AT&T switching center in San Francisco.”

Baquet “said that story proved overly technical and difficult to verify,” Folkenflik writes, and “he said the subsequent New York Times article on the same subject proved vague and was buried inside the paper.” Read more

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Snowden thought NBC would give him a ‘fair shake’

NBC News | The Washington Post | The New York Times | Glass

Edward Snowden says he chose to give his first big U.S. TV interview to NBC News because it did “actual individual reporting” on what he felt were the issues his leaks raised.

You broke some of the stories. And they were about controversial issues. So while I don’t know how this is going to show up on TV, I thought it was reasonable that, you know, you guys might give this a fair shake.

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Snowden held crypto party in Hawaii before his great reveal

Wired

Edward Snowden “introduced himself as Ed” at a crypto party he led in Hawaii several months before his world-rattling leaks of national surveillance documents to journalist Glenn Greenwald, Kevin Poulsen reports in Wired.

The parties, which feature tutorials on hard drive encryption and how-tos on using the Internet anonymously, are the brainchild of Australian activist Asher Wolf, Poulsen writes:

The idea was for technologists versed in software like Tor and PGP to get together with activists, journalists, and anyone else with a real-life need for those tools and show them the ropes. By the end of 2012, there’d been more than 1,000 such parties in countries around the world, by Wolf’s count. They were non-political and open to anyone.

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When Glenn Greenwald’s partner, David Miranda, was detained in Britain last year, Edward Snowden spent the day in contact with the reporter, an “extraordinary, and poignant, role reversal,” Ed Pilkington writes about an interview with the journalist a year after Snowden’s revelations.

“When he heard David was detained, Snowden was so enraged and concerned, which shocked me,” Greenwald says. “His own situation was very uncertain at the time – he’s facing 30, 40 years in prison if he ever comes back to the US, and yet he was supportive of what I was going through. That’s when I realised we were bonded in an eternal way to the same cause, which most journalists don’t like to admit, but I have no trouble admitting – we work to the same ends. We have a bond, a human bond.”

Bond or no bond, it strikes me as interesting that in the book, as in conversation, Greenwald only refers to his interlocutor as “Snowden”, never by his first name. What’s that about?

“It’s the weirdest thing. I cannot call him Ed. For the longest time we referred to him as ‘the source’. And then when I met him, I never used his name. It just rings false to call him Ed.”

Ed Pilkington, The Guardian

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