Edward Snowden

What reporters need to know about the recent Patriot Act ruling

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., right, who originally sponsored the Patriot Act, which governs the collection of phone records, questions witnesses from the National Security Agency, FBI, Justice Department, and the Office of Director of National Intelligence on Capitol Hill in this 2013 photo.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, R-Wis., right, who originally sponsored the Patriot Act, which governs the collection of phone records, questions witnesses from the National Security Agency, FBI, Justice Department, and the Office of Director of National Intelligence on Capitol Hill in this 2013 photo. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Many journalists are probably unsure just what to think of a federal appeals court ruling last week that the National Security Agency violated the USA Patriot Act when it collected the phone records of millions of Americans.

The 97-page opinion was harsh, overturned a lower court and was the first time a federal appeals court assessed the controversial program that followed the Sept.11 bombings. Its existence was disclosed in June 2013 by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden with the help of reporters including Glenn Greenwald. Read more

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Glenn Greenwald calls latest allegations against Snowden a joke

Lawyer and journalist Glenn Greenwald (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Lawyer and journalist Glenn Greenwald (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

The journalist central to Edward Snowden’s disclosures about the National Security Agency labels as “a self-parodying joke” new allegations that the former’s NSA contractor essentially helped terrorists evade U.S. surveillance.

“It’s a self-parodying joke,” Glenn Greenwald wrote in an email to me. He lives in Rio de Janeiro.

He was deriding claims in a new book by Michael Morrell, former deputy director of the CIA, that Snowden’s 2013 disclosures “played a role in the rise of ISIS.”

In a Daily Beast story by national security writer Shane Harris, it’s revealed that Morrell’s book implicates Snowden in the emergence and rise of ISIS.

“Within weeks of the leaks, terrorist organizations around the world were already starting to modify their actions in light of what Snowden disclosed. Read more

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ACLU’s NSA lawsuit claims that all Americans are potential plaintiffs

Yesterday, lawyers with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) filed a federal lawsuit against the National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Justice, requesting that they halt their program of collecting any and all Internet communications between Americans and overseas correspondents as part of their effort to fight the “War on Terror.” The lawsuit, which was filed on behalf of the Wikimedia Foundation, The Nation magazine, and a host of other media plaintiffs, represents perhaps the most significant attempt to halt the NSA’s practice of monitoring emails between American journalists and sources from outside the country.

Clearly, the ACLU’s lawyers took their time getting this lawsuit ready. Wikimedia founder Jimmy Wales and executive director Lila Tretikov published an opinion essay in The New York Times to coincide with the filing, and the lawsuit’s plaintiffs run the gamut of political opinion, including the Rutherford Institute, Amnesty International USA, Human Rights Watch, and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Read more

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Bill O’Reilly to NYT reporter: ‘I am coming after you with everything I have’

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Bill O’Reilly threatens jounalist

    In an interview with The New York Times Monday, Fox News host Bill O'Reilly warned reporter Emily Steel there could be consequences for inappropriate coverage surrounding disputed claims about his reportage of the Falklands War. “I am coming after you with everything I have,” Mr. O’Reilly said. “You can take it as a threat.” (The New York Times) | Politico's Dylan Byers followed up with Steel, who told him "the story speaks for itself." (Politico) | Here's Steel's tweet. (@emilysteel) | O'Reilly continued defending his coverage Monday and sought to end the controversy. (CNN Money) | Meanwhile, the author of a New York Times story that O'Reilly cited in his defense said the anchor "cut out an important phrase" while reading it on air.

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Edward Snowden documentary gets Oscar nod

“Citizenfour,” Laura Poitras’ cinematic ticktock revealing the story behind the NSA revelations of Edward Snowden, has been nominated for an Oscar in the “Best Documentary” category.

The news sparked jubilation on Twitter from staffers at First Look Media, who work with Poitras at The Intercept.

The movie is up against four other films: “Finding Vivian Maier,” a movie “about a mysterious nanny” who covertly snapped 100,000 photographs; “Last Days in Vietnam,” which is pretty much what it sounds like; “Salt of the Earth,” which follows a wildlife photographer’s peregrinations; and “Virunga,” which documents the struggle to save wild gorillas amid a civil war. Read more

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First Look seeks a publisher who can react ‘calmly to criticism’

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. (Please read the note below if you’d like to keep getting this email.)

  1. Second looks at First Look

    Andrew Rice's profile of First Look Media founder Pierre Omidyar unspools the billionaire's animating interest in pandemics and Edward Snowden's revalations. It also catalogs the startup's awkward first steps. "The confusion inherent to any start-up has been exacerbated by Omidyar’s ruminative style," he writes. “I’ve never met Pierre in person,” Intercept reporter Glenn Greenwald tells Rice. (New York) | The NYT snagged a First Look solicitation for a publisher who can react "calmly to criticism and negative feedback." (NYT) | Related: Micah Lee writes about how he helped Snowden, Greenwald and Laura Poitras connect, and the dashed plans for a Snowden site called supportonlinerights.com.

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That time Ben Bradlee thanked Richard Nixon

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Remembering Ben Bradlee on Twitter: Carlos Lozada, The Washington Post’s incoming nonfiction book critic, began tweeting passages from Ben Bradlee‘s memoir, “A Good Life,” after the former Post executive editor died Tuesday. (@CarlosLozadaWP) | 196 or so tweets later, here’s a selection: “It would be ungrateful of me not to pause here and acknowledge the role of Richard Milhouse Nixon in furthering my career.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “Make no mistake about it: there is only one thing an editor must have to be a good editor, and that is a good owner.” (@CarlosLozadaWP) | “When a job candidate came in with good clips but was soft spoken and reticent, #Bradlee’s verdict: ‘Ehhh.
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Dorian Nakamoto looks to sue Newsweek over Bitcoin story

mediawiremorningHey, hi. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Lawsuit over Newsweek’s Bitcoin story? The man who Newsweek’s Leah McGrath Goodman identified as the founder of Bitcoin is raising money on a website to sue the magazine, claiming he was “targeted and victimized by a reckless news organization.” Dorian Nakamoto has been unemployed for 10 years, the site says. “Donations, obviously, can be made by bitcoin.” (TechCrunch) | Previously: In March, Nakamoto told the AP he hadn’t heard of Bitcoin until his son told him about it after talking to Newsweek: “I got nothing to do with it.” (Poynter)
  2. Snyderman sorry for violating Ebola quarantine: The 21-day quarantine for NBC News crew members who traveled to Liberia is now mandatory after Dr. Nancy Snyderman violated the voluntary quarantine.
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AP journalist and translator killed in Gaza

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

Simone Camilli in Beit Lahiya on Monday. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. AP journalist and translator killed, photographer injured in Gaza: Simone Camilli and translator Ali Shehda Abu Afash “died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.” AP photographer Hatem Moussa was seriously injured in the explosion. (AP) | Moussa got AP’s “Beat of the Week” nod last month. (APME)
  2. Is there a second Snowden? James Bamford writes that he got “unrestricted access to [Edward Snowden's] cache of documents in various locations. And going through this archive using a sophisticated digital search tool, I could not find some of the documents that have made their way into public view, leading me to conclude that there must be a second leaker somewhere.” (Wired) | Related: What it’s like to do a photoshoot with Snowden.
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Yet another NYT digital tier?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Another NYT subscription tier? Lucia Moses reports: “According to a survey sent to readers this week, the new offering would give users 30 articles a month for $8, over 45 percent lower than the current cheapest offering.” (Digiday) | The Times has also floated the prospect of a shorter print edition in a survey, Joe Pompeo reported last week. (Capital) | The launch of its most recent digital products “has been anything but smooth.” (Poynter) | Sam Kirkland shows you how to save money on your NYT sub. (Poynter)
  2. Edward Snowden to stay longer in Russia: He got a three-year residence permit, his lawyer says. He’ll be able to travel abroad.
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