Articles about "ESPN"


Connor Schell, Bill Simmons

ESPN ‘frees’ Bill Simmons, but will he seek more freedom elsewhere?

mediawiremorningIt’s Wednesday. That means you get 10 media stories.

  1. Freed Simmons: ESPN’s Bill Simmons returns to the network today after his three-week suspension “for calling N.F.L. Commissioner Roger Goodell a ‘liar’ during a podcast, and then effectively daring ESPN to punish him.” His contract expires next fall, Jonathan Mahler and Richard Sandomir report. Will he leave? (New York Times) | Deadspin would take him. (Deadspin) | Previously: At the time of the suspension, Kelly McBride wrote, “when your biggest star declares himself above his newsroom’s standards, the boss has to respond.” (Poynter)
  2. Oops — ABC News didn’t beat NBC after all: Two weeks ago, Nielsen reported that ABC’s “World News Tonight” topped “NBC Nightly News” for the first time in 260 weeks. But it turns out NBC actually kept its streak alive thanks to revised ratings after Nielsen discovered inaccuracies, Bill Carter reports. (New York Times)
  3. How Time is getting all that traffic: “Time, together with sister site Money, published at least five different pieces” on the day the cable channel FXX began its marathon of “The Simpsons.” Joseph Lichterman takes a deep look at how Time is engaging its audience — and how it has more than doubled its unique visitors in a year. (Nieman Lab) | Previously: Time.com’s bounce rate down 15 percentage points since adopting continuous scroll (Poynter)
  4. AP’s Gannon speaks: “Honestly, I’ve thought it through so many times — I know neither Anja or I would have done anything differently,” says AP correspondent Kathy Gannon in her first interview since she and photographer Anja Niedringhaus were attacked in Afghanistan in April. Niedringhaus was killed, and Gannon “was hit with six bullets that ripped through her left arm, right hand and left shoulder, shattering her shoulder blade.” (Poynter)
  5. Layoffs at CNN, Conde Nast: CNN has closed its entertainment news division, and shows including Christiane Amanpour’s have lost their production staffs, Alex Weprin reports. (Capital New York) Meanwhile, “Condé Nast is expected to lay off 70 to 80 employees within the next week or two, primarily from the group that oversees ad sales,” writes Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg. (Wall Street Journal)
  6. Baltimore Sun redesign: A Los Angeles-times style redesign comes to another Tribune newspaper. Among the advantages, writes executive editor Trif Alatzas: “Endless-scroll technology connects you to other news categories and related articles and images without page breaks at the end of an article or Web page.” (Baltimore Sun) | Previously: New L.A. Times site: precooked tweets and a new flavor of infinite scroll (Poynter) | How news sites are adding continuous scrolls to article pages (Poynter)
  7. Vox’s email newsletter debuts today: One differentiator: It’ll be sent in the evening, not the morning. And it’ll consist of, uh, “sentences.” (Nieman Lab)
  8. ICYMI: The South Florida Sun Sentinel is reducing its emphasis on print, and that means changing things beyond workflow: “It’s our language, how we talk,” associate editor Anne Vasquez told Kristen Hare. For instance, “‘That was a great paper today’ or ‘Write that story for 1A.’” (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The final edition of the San Francisco Bay Guardian, “one of the most venerable, staunchly independent, and defiantly weird of America’s great alternative weekly newspapers,” as Slate’s Will Oremus describes it.
     
    sfbg
     
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Justin Bank is deputy editor of audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he ran The Washington Post’s audience and digital news team. (The New York Times) | Dao Nguyen is now BuzzFeed’s publisher. Previously, she was vice president of growth and data there. (Poynter) | Michael Dimock has been named president of the Pew Research Center. Previously, he was executive vice president there. (Politico) | Tessa Gould is senior director of native advertising at The Huffington Post. Previously, she was director of HuffPost’s partner studio. (Huffington Post) | Kevin Gentzel has been named head of advertising sales for Yahoo. Previously, he was chief revenue officer for The Washington Post. (Poynter) | Peter Cooper will be the writer and editor for the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. He’s a music columnist for The Tennessean. (The Tennessean) | Sean Kelley will be managing editor of Cooking Light. Previously, he was director of content and video for Sharecare. Katie Barreira will be director of Cooking Light Kitchen. Previously, she was food editor of Every Day with Rachael Ray. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: GoLocalPDX is looking for an investigative reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup sent to you each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Rainbow Room Reopening

N.Y. publishers mull more layoffs

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. More layoffs may come at New York publishers: “Industry executives are spending the month of October in closed-door meetings as they look for ways to tighten their belts even more.” (WWD) | Related: Time Inc. management “wants the ability to send 160 editorial jobs overseas,” Newspaper Guild of New York President Bill O’Meara says. (Capital) | Meta related: New owner Jay Penske‘s plan for WWD. (Capital) | Related sad trombone: “The joy we get from throwing magazines away seems like a bad sign for their future,” Laura Hazard Owen writes. (Gigaom)
  2. NBC News crew quarantined: They worked with freelance cameraman Ashoka Mukpo in Liberia and “Officials said the order was issued late Friday after the crew members violated an agreement to voluntarily confine themselves.” No one’s shown any signs of the disease. (Reuters) | “With the Ebola virus, you never relax completely, but we think [Mukpo] has made great progress,” a doctor at the Omaha hospital where he’s being treated said. (Mashable)
  3. Keith Olbermann notifies his bosses about his commentaries: Olbermann gives ESPN execs in Bristol “as much as six hours notice,” he tells Richard Deitsch. “The key people all get the A Block [opening] commentary and the Worst Persons. So the scripts are sitting with them for a couple of hours.” (SI)
  4. NYT kills chess column: Dylan Loeb McClain‘s Oct. 11 column ends with an abrupt note: “This is the final chess column to run in The New York Times.” (NYT) | “Few will mourn, even as a symbolic loss.” (@Kasparov63) | “A chess column has appeared in the NYT since… 1855.” (@DVNJr) | The bridge column is still breathing, Michael Roston notes. (@michaelroston)
  5. Why David Remnick isn’t on Twitter: “I don’t have a Twitter account, [but] not because I’m a dinosaur about it,” the New Yorker EIC tells Alexandra Steigrad. “I have enough of a platform here. People in my position who do it tend to use it in a promotional way or in a hamstrung way. I look at Twitter all the time as a news tool or for cultural conversation. I’ve used it in my reporting. It’s very useful.” (WWD)
  6. Peter Parker’s poor journalism ethics: “That’s exactly how Peter Parker paid the bills in the early Spider-Man comics, taking posed pictures of Spider-Man that no one else could get, then selling them to J. Jonah Jameson, the Daily Bugle’s editor-in-chief.” (Salon) | Related: 5 bad journalism lessons from Superman comics (Poynter)
  7. “The network just doesn’t surprise you”: Bill Carter looks at why MSNBC’s ratings “hit one of the deepest skids in its history, with the recently completed third quarter of 2014 generating some record lows.” (NYT)
  8. YouTube builds a “teaching hospital”: At its new production space in Manhattan, members of the company’s partner program “are given access to better cameras, production spaces and editing facilities as classes train them not just in shooting video, but also in makeup, design and anything else that might make programming pop online.” (NYT)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Chicago’s RedEye fronts a very nicely framed image from this weekend’s St. Louis protests. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    redeye-10132014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: David Cohn is now executive producer at AJ+. Previously, he was chief content officer at Circa. (Dave Cohn) | Lenika Cruz has been named associate editor at The Atlantic. Previously, she was a contributing editor at Circa. Grace White will be a reporter at CBS Houston. Previously, she was a reporter and anchor at Fox 29 San Antonio. (Muck Rack) | Rick Daniels has been named publisher at The Hartford (Connecticut) Courant. Previously, he was chief operating officer of GoLocal24. Nancy Meyer has been named publisher and CEO of Orlando Sentinel Media Group. Previously, she was publisher of the Courant. (Poynter) | Dana Hahn has been named news director for KTVU in San Francisco. Previously, she was news director for WTTG in Washington, D.C. Sara Suarez has been named news director for WFDC in Washington, D.C. Previously, she was news director for WUNI in Boston. Matt King has been named news director for WCNC in Charlotte, North Carolina. Previously, he was assistant news director at WXIA in Atlanta. Jeff Mulligan has been named news director for WMBD/WYZZ in Peoria, Illinois. Previously, he was assistant news director for WISH in Indianapolis. Lee Rosenthal has been named news director at WFXT in Boston. Previously, he was news director at KTVU. Rick Moll has been named news director at WSLS in Roanoke, Virginia. Previously, he was news director for WMBD/WYZZ in Peoria, Illinois. Brian Nemitz has been named assistant news director at WLOS in Asheville, North Carolina. Previously, he was a nightside executive producer at WTVJ in Miami. Martha Jennings has been named assistant news director at WBIR in Knoxville, Tennessee. Previously, she was nightside executive producer at WFLA in Tampa, Florida. Troy Conhain has been named nightside executive producer at KOLD in Tucson, Arizona. Previously, he was morning executive producer at KPHO in Phoenix, Arizona. (Rick Gevers) | Job of the day The Hill is looking for a campaign reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Programming note: I’m going to be off for most of this week and will be at the Creative Belfast conference on Thursday. Sam Kirkland will leave a roundup under your pillow while I’m gone. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person. (Minneapolis City Pages)
  3. Esquire botches attack on ESPN: There was no all-male domestic violence panel planned, ESPN said Monday. (Deadspin) | Esquire apologized for that and for “saying that ESPN is not in the business of journalism,” Hearst Digital editorial director Kate Lewis writes in a note on the piece. Esquire is owned by Hearst, which has a 20 percent stake in ESPN, Jeremy Barr reports. “A Hearst spokesperson did not respond directly to a Capital inquiry about whether the company’s investment in ESPN played a role in the apology.” (Capital) | Despite the apology, Esquire kept a sentence that said “ESPN is not a company in the business of journalism” in the story until later that evening. (WP) | Craig Silverman finds articles with the erroneous information were shared far more widely than articles that corrected it. (Emergent)
  4. Roxane Gay will edit cultural criticism site: The Toast has hired the bestselling author to head up a new site called The Butter. (Capital) | Not at all related but this was the only item I could wedge it into: Piers Morgan will write commentary for Daily Mail Online. (Politico)
  5. Newsweek places editor’s note over Zakaria archives: “Fareed Zakaria worked for Newsweek when it was under previous ownership,” the note, which also rides along on Zakaria’s archived articles, says. “Readers are advised that some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others.” (Poynter) | “New Fun Trawling Through Fareed Zakaria’s @Newsweek Archives, Part 1″ (@blippoblappo)
  6. Will Bill Simmons stay at ESPN? He “did not think that what he said or how he said it was worthy of one of the harshest suspensions in ESPN history,” John Ourand reported Friday in a tick-tock of how ESPN decided to put its star on ice. Simmons’ contract will be up next year, Ourand writes, and “it will be interesting to see whether this suspension derails those talks.” (SportsBusiness Daily) | The clash reflects a generational conflict at ESPN, Jason McIntyre reported Friday. “The old guard has its fingers crossed they can pester and annoy Simmons to the point that he pulls the trigger on a plan they claim he’s been mulling after spending so much time in Hollywood: decamp from ESPN to a venture capital-backed solo operation with contributions from his West Coast buddies Jimmy Kimmel and Adam Carolla.” (The Big Lead) | Erik Wemple: Suspensions “are effective primarily in forgetting and neglecting the root causes of the stupidity that materializes on air.” (WP)
  7. Chartbeat can now measure readers’ attention: The Media Ratings Council has approved Chartbeat’s bid to measure attention rather than pageviews or unique visitors. (Gigaom) | “If you’re dealing with something where you can prove attention better, you can charge more,” Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile tells Andrew Nusca. (Fortune) | Haile noted in February that there is “effectively no correlation between social shares and people actually reading.” (The Verge) | Rick Edmonds in March: “Time to ditch uniques and page views for engagement in measuring digital audiences” (Poynter)
  8. RIP Joe Nawrozki: The investigative reporter worked for three Baltimore newspapers, dug up political corruption among pols, and “taught martial arts for more than 40 years.” He died Saturday. He was 70. (The Baltimore Sun)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Taiwan’s Apple Daily fronts the Hong Kong protests. (Courtesy Newseum)

    appledaily_09302014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Shoket will be a consultant for Hearst. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of Seventeen magazine. (Capital) | Kal Penn will be a special correspondent for Fusion. Previously, he was associate director of the White House’s Office of Public Engagement. (Politico) | Richard Tomko is now publisher of amNewYork. Previously, he was a consultant at Boost Digital. (Email) | Tony Brancato is now executive director of Web products and audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he was head of product for the Web there. (The New York Times) | Sandy Johnson is now president and chief operating officer at The National Press Foundation. Previously, she was the excecutive editor at Stateline.org. (National Press Foundation) | Jeff Simon will be a video producer at CNN. He’s a producer for The Washington Post. (@jjsimonWP) | Cynthia Littleton will be Variety’s managing editor for television. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of television. Claudia Eller and Andrew Wallenstein are now co-editors-in-chief at Variety. Eller was editor-in-chief of film at Variety. Wallenstein was editor-in-chief of digital there. (Variety) | Sonya Thompson will be director of news projects for Tribune Media Group. She was news director for WJW in Cleveland. Mitch Jacob will be news director at WJLA. He was news director for WSYX in Columbus. Jamie Justice will be news director at WSYX in Columbus. Previously, she was assistant news director there. Rob Cartwright is now news director for KEYE in Austin. Previously, he was news director for WSYR in Syracuse. Jeff Houston is now news director for WBMA in Birmingham. Previously, he was an assistant news director there. (Rick Gevers) | James VanOsdol has been named newsroom program manager at Rivet News Radio. He is an anchor at HearHere Radio LLC. (Robert Feder) | Job of the day: Politico is looking for a tax reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Ben Bradlee

Ben Bradlee is receiving hospice care

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ESPN asks dudes to address domestic violence: A two-hour pregame show preceding Monday Night Football will feature, among other things, a panel discussion featuring 11 men, Ben Collins reports. “When the show has updates from the field—brief reports about injuries and the upcoming game—they’ll cut to female sideline reporters, Lisa Salters and, on some weeks, Suzy Kolber. ¶ These people are not allowed at the table.” (Esquire) | UPDATE, 12:39 P.M.: ESPN says no such panel is planned. (Deadspin)
  2. Ben Bradlee is getting hospice care: The former Washington Post editor has dementia, his wife, Sally Quinn, said in a C-SPAN interview broadcast Sunday. (Politico) | “[O]ver time, his condition became more difficult to manage.” (WP)
  3. Reporting is dangerous: Indian journalist Rajdeep Sardesai was harassed outside Madison Square Garden Sunday, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi spoke. (The Times of India) | “Mob of people attacking an Indian journalist for being critical of Modi on the past.” (@JFK_America) | AP photographer Andre Penner was “punched and kicked Friday at a presidential campaign event in Brazil.” (AP)
  4. Instagram blocked in mainland China: “While the exact reason behind the shutdown was not immediately confirmable, it seemed likely that the sudden mainland disruption was linked to the flood of images related to the Hong Kong protests on Instagram.” (FP) | On Sunday more than a 100,000 people in Hong Kong downloaded FireChat, which allows chat over WiFi and Bluetooth. (South China Morning Post)
  5. Magazines want to be count their readers in a new manner: Using circulation numbers “simply and significantly underrepresents the actual audience,” Association of Magazine Media honcho Mary Berner tells Nicole Levy. (Capital) | “Readers or viewers are likely to be counted multiple times depending on how they access the content any given month.” (WSJ) | You can look at the “Magazine Media 360⁰ Brand Audience Data” here. | Definitely related: It’s Advertising Week. | Slightly related: Under art editor Françoise Mouly, The New Yorker’s covers have become edgier and more topical, moving away from what Editor David Remnick calls “a lot of abandoned beach houses, bowls of fruit and covers reflecting the change of seasons.” (NYT) | Definitely related to that slightly related item: This week’s cover has an animated GIF. (The New Yorker)niemann-cover-690x962
  6. The Mercury News has moved: New building lacks a moat. “It’s something I’ve dreamed about for years but never thought would really happen,” Sal Pizarro writes. (San Jose Mercury News)
  7. Jeff Bezos talks to press: In an interview (!) with Mihir Dalal, Leslie D’Monte and Shrutika Verma, Bezos hinted at his ambitions with regard to The Washington Post. “[I]f you have a great newsroom … you can go from having a really successful local paper, which is what the Washington Post was, you can go from that to being a national paper and even a global paper. (Mint)
  8. ONA ends with awards: An awards banquet Saturday closed out the conference, with ProPublica, The Seattle Times and the Los Angeles Times taking home some hardware. (ONA) | “This must be the TSA’s way of saying ‘Congratulations on winning five sharp, pointy lucite awards.’” (@kleinmatic)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: A cloud of teargas looms over a crowd of protesters on the front of the South China Morning Post.scmp_09292014
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Bryan Zidar is now managing director of corporate communications for Alaska Airlines. Previously, he was director of corporate communications at T-Mobile US. (PR Newser) | Taimur Ahmad is now CEO of LatinFinance. Previously, he was editor-in-chief there. Katie Llanos-Small is now editor-in-chief of LatinFinance. Previously, she was news editor there. (Marketwired) | Judy Davidoff will be editor at Isthmus. Previously, she was news editor there. (Madison.com) | Job of the day: The Montrose (Colorado) Daily Press is looking for a news editor and paginator. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Bill Simmons: Diva or fall guy?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Almost there. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ESPN ombo: “Is anybody watching the baby?” Bill Simmons‘ “energy and creativity…can also morph into tunnel vision and self-absorption,” ESPN ombudsman Robert Lipsyte writes. “What makes him always think something’s right just because he thinks it is?” (ESPN) | Josh Levin: “When Simmons said ‘I dare you,’ he was talking like a made man—someone who, on account of his popularity, reputation, and well-placed allies, could break the rules that ordinary people have to follow.” (Slate) | “Simmons was on solid ground when he called Goodell’s response ‘fucking bullshit.’ … But calling him a liar went over a line, because it draws a conclusion that we cannot draw.” (Poynter) | “At some point, ESPN’s commentators should also get to call one of the more powerful men in their industry a liar.” (The New Yorker)
  2. Moving day at The Indianapolis Star: “You can follow along with our move on social media at the hashtag #starevolving,” Cori Faklaris writes. “We open Monday at 130 S. Meridian St., in the space formerly occupied by Nordstrom at Circle Centre mall.” (Indy Star)
  3. Twitter wants to be a “tool, not a competitor”: At ONA, Twitter head of news Vivian Schiller‘s panel tried to “highlight the latest in an ever-evolving set of best practices for newsrooms using the social platform.” (NetNewsCheck)
  4. A couple more ONA stories from the Poynter dot orggers: Advice for women in leadership from Anna Holmes, Liz Heron, Benet Wilson and Callie Schweitzer (Poynter) | Five things about covering Ferguson (Poynter) | 4 quick Twitter tips from Time, CNN, Mashable and NPR (Poynter)
  5. Jim Brady’s new thing: “Even if Brady is able to steer Billy Penn toward profitability, it seems unlikely he can do so while regularly serving up serious-minded public-interest reporting,” Simon van Zuylen-Wood writes. (Philadelphia)
  6. Why Time runs content from other publishers: “The partners can hope for traffic via links back to their own site, but most likely, the main benefit is brand awareness,” Lucia Moses writes. But it “doesn’t plan to let the partner content exceed 10 percent of the site’s overall traffic.” (Digiday)
  7. FAA eases up on drone rules: For filmmakers. (Variety)
  8. Media jobs that offer work-life balance — wha? Data scientist, social media manager make a list. (Media Jobs Daily)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: The New York Post fronts Derek Jeter’s magical last game. (Courtesy the Newseum)

    nyp-09262014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Mark Smith will be mobile Web editor for The Washington Post. Previously, he was senior manager of social media marketing at USA Today. (Washington Post) | Brian Gross will be deputy design director at The Washington Post. Currently, he’s lead senior designer there. Emmet Smith will be lead senior designer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was a senior designer there. (Washington Post) | Julia Cheiffetz is now executive editor at Dey Street Books. Previously, she was editorial director at Amazon. (@rachelsklar) | Stephen Collinson is now a senior enterprise reporter for CNN’s digital politics. Previously, he was a White House correspondent for Agence France-Presse. (Politico) | Matt Vella is now assistant managing editor at Time magazine. Previously, he was a senior editor at Fortune. Sam Jacobs is an assistant managing editor for Time magazine. Previously, he was a senior editor at Time. Kelly Conniff is now senior editor for special projects at Time magazine. Previously, she was a social media editor at Time. Mia Tramz is now multimedia editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was associate photo editor at Time Magazine. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: The Idaho Statesman is looking for a breaking news reporter. Get your résumés in! | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
bs_report_300

Bill Simmons’ ESPN suspension and the challenges of editing star talent

Whether you think Bill Simmons is the latest sacrificial lamb at ESPN, or that his suspension is really theater in the vein of professional wrestling, there are important issues behind the suspension that we could all pay some attention to.

  • Too much content, too little editing: From podcasts to blogs to social media posts, there is a fair amount of content that goes straight to the audience with very little editing. With small changes (see word choice, below) to his rant, Simmons could have stayed within the boundaries of ESPN’s acceptable journalistic standards. In broadcast, that’s the producer’s role. In writing it’s the editor’s role. There is editing and production that takes place. But do those people do their work with an ear toward editorial standards? It’s hard to say if that’s even possible with a marquee talent like Simmons (see Stars, below.) But they could and they should.
  • Word choice: Simmons was on solid ground when he called Goodell’s response “fucking bullshit.” Suggesting the football commissioner take a lie detector test was clever. But calling him a liar went over a line, because it draws a conclusion that we cannot draw.  The best reporting has demonstrated that the Ravens’ staff were aware of the contents of the elevator video and that someone at the NFL knew as well. It’s easy to assert that Goodell should have known. But that doesn’t add up to liar. When you make accusations you can’t verify, you have moved outside of journalism into something else – politics, spin, deception? Even opinionated journalists should base their work on established facts.
  • Stars: When I served as the head writer for the ESPN-Poynter Review Project, several ESPN employees told me, in confidence, how difficult it was to edit Bill Simmons. ESPN is not unique. This is true of many big stars in many newsrooms. Stars that operate outside the rules of engagement leave the organization exposed. It’s good for ESPN to have commentators pushing the boundaries of taste and journalistic ethics, that’s what the audience wants. Provocation is tried and true meme. But it’s even better to have a process that prevents stars and everyone else from blowing through those boundaries because they don’t realize it or they don’t care.
  • Consistency: Ethics codes and editorial standards are fabulous, but if an organization inconsistently applies them, they become a weakness not an asset. That’s because they can be used against you. An organization as big and spread out as ESPN has steep challenges. How can it apply to same standards to its premiere investigative show, Outside the Lines, as it does to blog posts and podcasts? The answer lies in constant attention to process.

It’s hard to measure whether an organization has healthy processes. We never hear about the times that ESPN dials a writer or on-air talent back. We don’t see the great catches that editors make. We only see the gaffes. And given the volume of content that ESPN produces, there will likely be plenty of fodder for critics like Deadspin.

That said, when your biggest star declares himself above his newsroom’s standards, the boss has to respond. Read more

Tools:
22 Comments

The ‘One-Page Magazine’ is toast

mediawiremorningGood morning from Chicago, where the Poynter dot org crew is attending the 2014 Online News Association Conference. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ESPN benches Bill Simmons: The talking head and Grantland boss said on a podcast that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was a “liar” and “has no integrity whatsoever.” ESPN has removed the podcast. (NYT) | Richard Deitsch: “ESPN management is looking to become more decisive with suspensions when its employees go off the rails.” (SI)
  2. Forbes zaps contributor after stupid article: Bill Frezza‘s article “Drunk Female Guests Are the Gravest Threat To Fraternities” “was removed from Forbes.com almost immediately after he published it,” a Forbes spox tells Philip Caulfield. “Mr. Frezza is no longer a contributor to Forbes.com.” Frezza: “I stand by every word I wrote.” (NYDN) | Jessica Roy: “Only when we tackle the menace of drunk girls, who are absolutely getting themselves drunk while the sober brothers lock themselves in their rooms and study, can the fraternity system be restored to its rightful glory.” (NY Mag)
  3. NPR kills Robert Krulwich’s blog: “I can’t pretend. I’m sorry to have to move on.” (NPR) | NPR’s statement to Poynter’s Ben Mullin: “As [Radiolab] has grown, it has consumed a larger share of [Krulwich's] time. … Robert expects to continue his signature work for WNYC, including hosting Radiolab which is heard by millions on public radio stations across the country.”
  4. What went wrong at The Wire? Former editor Gabriel Snyder says he “always considered The Wire a great success story,” Justin Ellis reports. “I’m sorry to see the leadership of The Atlantic didn’t see it that way.” (Nieman)
  5. The Ethicist abides: But the “One-Page Magazine” and “Who Made That” are toast as new New York Times Magazine editor Jake Silverstein cleans “up the book in anticipation of the redesign,” Joe Pompeo reports. (Capital)
  6. Weisberg v. Blappo: Slate Group honcho Jacob Weisberg called @blippoblappo and @crushingbort‘s most recent docket of charges against Fareed Zakaria “silly.” In response, they put a 1998 Zakaria column for Slate under their microscope. (Our Bad Media) | Weisberg retweeted Jesse Eisinger: “.@jacobwe is right & @blippoblappo is wrong on this new Fareed Zakaria plagiarism accusation. Also: it’s trivial.” (@eisingerj) | A little further down in Eisinger’s responses: “Generally, I think plagiarism is a low order journalism crime.”
  7. After Stanley/Rhimes affair, reflections: “Are critics – some of whom are big-name stars – subject to rigorous and questioning editing, or is there a hands-off approach?” NYT Public Editor Margaret Sullivan writes. Executive Editor Dean Baquet tells her diversity is “an issue and we need to work on it.” (NYT) | Baquet reorged the Times’ masthead yesterday, eliminating the position of managing editor and elevating four people to “deputy executive editor.” (NYT) | Baquet’s memo to staff. (Poynter)
  8. It’s not too late to vote for salvo! Poynter dot org yesterday settled on a list of words that are often written, never spoken. Please vote for one to ban forever. Ballyhoo is currently winning; results later today. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Via David Shedden‘s media-history post this morning, the Sept. 25, 1690, front of Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick.

    Publick-Occurrences-2 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Susan Chira is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. Previously, she was an assistant managing editor there. Janet Elder is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. Previously, she was a deputy managing editor there. Matt Purdy is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. He was an assistant managing editor there. Ian Fisher is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was an assistant managing editor there. Steve Duenes is now an assistant editor at the New York Times. Previously, he was graphics director there. Clifford Levy is an associate editor at the New York Times. He is the head of NYT Now. Alexandra MacCallum is now an assistant editor at The New York Times. Previously, she was an assistant managing editor there. Tom Bodkin is now creative director at The New York Times. Previously, he was a deputy managing editor there. Joe Kahn will be assistant editor for international at The New York Times. Previously, he was foreign editor there. (The New York Times) | Bill Mulvihill is now associate publisher at The Atlantic. Previously, he was national advertising director for Vanity Fair. (Email) | Roxanna Sherwood is now executive producer of “Nightline.” Previously, she was a senior producer on “20/20.” (TV Newser) | Job of the day:The Charleston Daily Mail is looking for a statehouse reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Hey hey, ONA: Gimme a shout if you’re here! @abeaujon/abeaujon@poynter.org/703-594-1103.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Spin loses another editor-in-chief

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Craig Marks is no longer EIC of Spin: Marks tells Poynter via email he’s out. He was the publication’s fourth editor in two years. Stephen Blackwell, SpinMedia’s fourth CEO in the same amount of time, told me Monday that he had “high hopes” for the publication, and that it would add more editing talent soon. (Poynter) | A quick phone call with Marks: “It was a mutual and amicable decision that I would leave,” he said. “With the new CEO and the new regime it felt like the right time to part ways. I would like to pursue other interests including trying to finally get a bead on my next book.” Marks, who was executive editor at the magazine in the ’90s (I worked with him then for a spell then, in my first media job), took the job in June and says the split was not performance-related. I asked him whether he felt like his brief stay there — a summer job? — had been a waste of time. “No, not at all,” he said. “It was really great, even if it was brief, to be back at Spin and to help restore and revive a publication that meant a lot and means a lot to people, and I sincerely hope I helped lay the groundwork for Spin to be good and relevant and meaningful.”
  2. Somaly Mam says she didn’t lie: “This past May, Mam’s life imploded after a Newsweek report left the impression that she had fabricated her life story and had encouraged a girl in her care to lie that she had been trafficked,” Abigail Pesta writes. “While in Cambodia, I investigated the claims against Mam and spoke to people cited in the Newsweek piece, three of whom said their views were misrepresented. One of the three, identified in Newsweek as a woman, is, in fact, a man.” (Marie Claire)
  3. Mark Ruffalo visited The Boston Globe: The actor was researching his role as reporter Michael Rezendes in “Spotlight,” a film about the Globe’s reporting on the Catholic Church’s sex-abuse scandal. (The Boston Globe)
  4. “On this beat if you fuck up with the national office, you’re fucked”: Dave McKenna writes about the uneven power relationships between the league and its media “partners” that makes independent NFL coverage very difficult. (Deadspin) | Related: Advertisers, including Anheuser-Busch and McDonald’s, have said they’re not satisfied with the NFL’s response to child abuse and domestic violence charges against players. (ESPN)
  5. Influential LGBT people in media: NPR reporter Ari Shapiro (currently enduring the sound of bagpipes as he covers the Scots referendum), Janet Mock, Re/code’s Ina Fried and Capital’s Tom McGeveran make the top 50. (Advocate)
  6. New offices for Gawker publications: “For want of others seeking the role, we are the guardians of independent media,” Gawker Media honcho Nick Denton (No. 7 on the Advocate list) says in a memo to staffers, telling them they’ll soon be blogging from 114 Fifth Ave. (Re/code) | “The new office is just a few blocks from Gawker competitors Buzzfeed and Business Insider, and is in the same building as social news site Mashable and Pierre Omidyar’s First Look Media, which is where former Gawker editor John Cook currently works.” (Capital)
  7. Is it plagiarism? Ben Mullin made a handy flowchart for editors and media watchers. (Poynter)
  8. Journalist murdered in Afghanistan: Palwasha Tokhi Miranzai “was repeatedly stabbed by unidentified men inside her house in Mazar-e-Sharif city.” (Khaama Press)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: A scary waterspout on the front of the Pensacola News Journal. (Courtesy Newseum)

    pensacola-09172014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Guy Vidra will become the new CEO of The New Republic. He is the general manager of Yahoo News. Owner Chris Hughes will remain as publisher but will no longer be editor-in-chief. (The New Republic) | Dana Liebelson will be a political reporter at HuffPost Politics. She’s a reporter for Mother Jones. (Email) | Ashley Codianni is now a senior producer and digital correspondent for CNN Politics Digital. She’s Mashable’s director of news video. (Fishbowl DC) | Cara Parks has been named executive editor at Modern Farmer. She was previously a freelancer and deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. (Observer.com) | Suejin Yang has been named vice president and general manager of digital entertainment at People and Entertainment Weekly. Previously, she was vice president of Bravo Digital Media. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: ProPublica is looking for a research editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Yahoo names editors for 2 verticals

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Kate Lanphear is now editor-in-chief of Maxim. Previously, she was style editor at T Magazine. (WWD)
  • Kerry Diamond is now editor-in-chief of Yahoo Food. She is the co-founder and editorial director of Cherry Bombe. Kristen Baldwin is editor-in-chief of Yahoo TV. Previously, she was deputy editor at Entertainment Weekly. (Email)
  • Alice Gabriner will be international photo editor for Time magazine. She was a senior photo editor at National Geographic. Mandy Oaklander will be a staff writer for Time magazine. Previously, she was a senior writer for Prevention.com. Jack Linshi is a breaking news reporter and homepage editor at Time magazine. He was a weekend arts and living editor at the Yale Daily News. Lily Rothman will be an archive editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was a reporter there. Reno Ong will be an audience engagement editor at Time magazine. Previously she was a copy editor there. (Fishbowl DC)
  • Emma Fitzsimmons is a transit reporter for The New York Times. Previously, she was a reporter there. (NYT Metro desk)
  • Pamela Henson is now president and publisher of the Appleton (Wisconsin) Post-Crescent. She was senior vice president of advertising, marketing and digital sales at the Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Journal-Sentinel. (Gannett)
  • Tim Tebow is now a contributor at Good Morning America. He’s a college football analyst for ESPN. (ABC News)

Job of the day: Mashable is looking for a San Francisco-based social media reporter. Get your résumés in! (Mashable)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
foley-2

James Foley family’s new fund will ‘honor what he stood for’

mediawiremorningGood morning. We’re nearly there. Here are 10 media stories, plus a fact that made me sigh and quietly review my life choices: The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Ready to Die” came out 20 years ago Saturday.

  1. Foley, Tice parents speak: “I really feel that our country let Jim down,” James Foley‘s mother Diane Foley tells Anderson Cooper. She says her son “was sacrificed because of just a lack of coordination, lack of communication, lack of prioritization.” (CNN) | Earlier this week, Austin Tice‘s parents told Clarissa Ward, “If an American citizen is held hostage overseas, you are discouraged and disparaged if you even consider paying a reward for a precious human child, because you don’t know where that reward money’s gonna go. …You know, we’re just a mom and dad. We just want our child back, and we wanna do whatever it takes.” (CBS News) | A message from the Foley family Twitter account: “please follow our new Twitter account @JamesFoleyFund.” (@freejamesfoley) | The fund will “honor what he stood for,” the family writes, with plans to build “a resource center for families of American hostages and [foster] a global dialog on governmental policies in hostage crises,” among other goals. (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  2. Networks say they won’t show Rice video anymore: ESPN made that call Tuesday morning, David Bauder reports. “It was obviously quite disturbing and we felt the audience had seen it enough,” ESPN spox Josh Krulewitz said. (AP) | Meredith Clark: “Using the video without consent violates our ethical obligation to treat Janay Rice and other survivors of intimate partner violence as people rather than vehicles for social change.” (Poynter) | Related: How “did Goodell pick the Rice case to appear insufficiently authoritarian?” Jack Shafer asks. (Reuters)
  3. What a watch-based media landscape may look like: “The Apple Watch also makes a solid case for a more algorithmically curated, condensed Twitter timeline,” Dan Frommer writes. “One thing we noticed is the text in Twitter’s app that describes your Timeline: ‘New and interesting.’” (Quartz) | “We are about to enter the era of ‘glance journalism.’” (Nieman) | Yahoo News Digest already works on Apple Watch, and Circa is looking into it. (BuzzFeed) | Very related: Research from Irene Costera Meijer and Tim Groot Kormelink looks into news consumption, including “Checking and scanning vs snacking and monitoring.” (Online Journalism Blog)
  4. Speaking of Yahoo News Digest: Its new iPad app hit the App Store last night. (Yahoo’s Tumblr) | Nick D’Aloisio, who heads the Yahoo News Digest team, tells Leo Kelion he is “weighing up university and Yahoo” for next year. (He’s 18.) (BBC News)
  5. Attn: NYC tourism folks: Humans of New York blogger Brandon Stanton: “Out of all the countries that I’ve been to, Ukraine reminded me the most of home.” (Kyiv Post)
  6. You know how we keep talking about the revenue potential of video ads? Almost 20 percent of that market belongs to YouTube, but that may be as high as it gets. (WSJ)
  7. Intern apologizes: Mallory Musallam wrote a letter to former internship host David Letterman saying she’d withdrawn from a class action suit and had been “approached by a beguiling legion of lawsuit-hungry attorneys.” (NYDN)
  8. Vook has bought the ashes of Byliner: “The deal may be good news for Byliner authors who wondered how they were going to get paid,” Laura Hazard Owen reports. “Vook said Thursday that it would be paying them 85 percent royalties on works that were already for sale at digital retailers like Amazon and Apple.” (Gigaom)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: A moving photo on The New York Times. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    nyt_09122014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Kate Lanphear is now editor-in-chief of Maxim. Previously, she was style editor at T Magazine. (WWD) | Kerry Diamond is now editor-in-chief of Yahoo Food. She is the co-founder and editorial director of Cherry Bombe. Kristen Baldwin is editor-in-chief of Yahoo TV. Previously, she was deputy editor at Entertainment Weekly. (Email) | Alice Gabriner will be international photo editor for Time magazine. She was a senior photo editor at National Geographic. Mandy Oaklander will be a staff writer for Time magazine. Previously, she was a senior writer for Prevention.com. Jack Linshi is a breaking news reporter and homepage editor at Time magazine. He was a weekend arts and living editor at the Yale Daily News. Lily Rothman will be an archive editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was a reporter there. Reno Ong will be an audience engagement editor at Time magazine. Previously she was a copy editor there. (Fishbowl DC) | Emma Fitzsimmons is a transit reporter for The New York Times. Previously, she was a reporter there. (NYT Metro desk) | Pamela Henson is now president and publisher of the Appleton (Wisconsin) Post-Crescent. She was senior vice president of advertising, marketing and digital sales at the Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Journal-Sentinel. (Gannett) | Tim Tebow is now a contributor at “Good Morning America.” He’s a college football analyst for ESPN. (ABC News) | Job of the day: Mashable is looking for a San Francisco-based social media reporter. Get your résumés in! (Mashable) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments