Articles about "Ethics"


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New executive director sought for last U.S. news council; only gutsy need apply

The Seattle-based Washington News Council is seeking a new executive director, and wants one with nerves of steel, strong values and digital acumen.

The search comes at a turning point in the history of the nonprofit news council, which is the last in this country taking complaints from readers and viewers and, when needed, holding hearings to air issues about media fairness and accuracy.

John Hamer, the council’s president and executive director, is retiring after 15 years. He and others founded the news council in 1998 and, while the organization has survived, other local and regional news councils as well as the national council that operated in 1970s and 1980s have not.

A key factor in the Washington News Council’s survival has been Bill Gates Sr.… Read more

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Understanding opportunities and challenges in sponsored content (Replay chat)

Shane Snow, cofounder with two friends of Contently, manages a network of 25,000 freelancers. According to Contently’s website, the sweet spot where these freelancers thrive is creating content for “brands, nonprofits, and lean new media companies.”

Snow and his team, described as a mashup of journalists and nerds, are on the front edge of branded content or native advertising.

Forbes, a Contently client, recognized Snow this month in “30 under 30: These People are Building the Media Companies of Tomorrow.”

Snow joined us for a live chat on the opportunities, challenges and values of sponsored content.

Participants asked Snow about the ins and outs of branded content.

Twitter users can participate in any Poynter live chat using the hashtag #poynterchats. You can revisit this page at any time to replay the chat after it has ended.… Read more

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Handcuffed (Depositphotos)

College papers dropping arrestee names from crime blotters

Those arrested on the University of Connecticut campus this academic year may not feel lucky, but actually they are catching a break. Their arrests are being published in the student-run campus daily newspaper as has been typical for decades, but their names are not being made public.

In the fall of 2013, UCONN student editors ended — at least for this academic year — The Daily Campus’ long-standing practice of publishing names in its regular Police Blotter feature.  The change elicited some sharp questions from members of the paper’s board of directors, some head-shaking and exasperation from the journalism faculty and an apparent tweet by a former Daily Campus staffer who labeled the change as “lame.”

Emotional responses and resistance to change notwithstanding, UCONN’s student journalists are far from alone in considering whether to follow past practices when the Internet has bestowed immortality and eased access to all types of information.… Read more

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Journalists continue to rank low in public trust. (Depositphotos)

Still slip-sliding: Gallup poll ranks journalists low on honesty, ethics

Gallup released a poll on “U.S. Views on Honesty and Ethical Standards in Professions” Monday, and journalists rank pretty low.

The poll, conducted Dec. 5 through 8, used telephone interviews with a random sample of more than 1,000 adults in the country.

Their findings: just 21 percent of the people surveyed ranked newspaper reporters with high or very high honesty and ethical standards. Next came lawyers, tying with 21 percent, followed by TV reporters at 20 percent, then advertisers at a miserable 14 percent.… Read more

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Newtown’s media blackout forces journalists to do their jobs

The one-year anniversary of a tragic event is a significant moment. But for journalists, such moments too often become opportunities for emotional exploitation rather than real journalism.

The citizens of Newtown, Conn., and the families of the Sandy Hook Elementary School victims have drawn a hard boundary around their homes. No media, they’ve said to the outside world. Don’t talk to the media, they’ve said to the 28,000 people who live in the community.

In doing so, they’ve deprived newsrooms of the easy visuals and rote storytelling that have sometimes substituted for meaningful journalism. And that’s good: It forces journalists to do the hard work they should be doing on the first anniversary of the mass shooting that killed 20 first-graders and six adults.

In a way, it’s a gift to the audience everywhere that Newtown is spurning public events.… Read more

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PoynterVision: White House photo practices break promise of open government

Kenny Irby, senior faculty at Poynter, advises the public to critically analyze photos from the White House Press Office, particularly as it routinely denies photojournalists access to the president.

Founder of Poynter’s photojournalism program, Irby says he doesn’t believe the Obama administration is living up to its promise of “open government.”

Irby argues White House chief photographer Pete Souza‘s role is more that of a “propagandist” than a photojournalist since his job is to make the president “look good, make the president look presidential.”

In the past week, several news organizations, including the McClatchy newspapers, USA Today and the AP have said they will not use handout photos originating from the White House Press Office, except in rare circumstances.


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Raul Ramirez, KQED's executive director of news and public affairs, died Nov. 15, 2013. (KQED Photo)

‘Power of voices’: Inspiring last words from journalist Raul Ramirez

Raul Ramirez, KQED’s executive director of news and public affairs, died Nov. 15, 2013. (KQED Photo)

Editor’s note: Raul Ramirez, KQED Public Radio’s executive director of news and public affairs and former Poynter Ethics Fellow, died Nov. 15 at age 67. He was scheduled to receive the 2013 Distinguished Service to Journalism Award from the Northern California chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and deliver an address that announced creation of the Raul Ramirez Fund for Diversity in Journalism at San Francisco State University. Ramirez passed away before he could give his speech. In his place, Jon Funabiki, SFSU journalism professor who had known Ramirez for 25 years, presented his friend’s address at the chapter’s awards event on Tuesday. The speech is reprinted here with permission from KQED, which originally published it:

Dear Colleagues:

In my four decades as a journalist, the power of people’s voices has shaped my work.… Read more

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Attribution in a digital age is getting murkier. (Depositphotos)

Getting digital attribution right, Part 2

This is the second of a two-part series. Part 1 is here.

Traditional journalism standards have typically governed attribution, and the general rule when using the work of others verbatim is to put quotation marks around the republished content and clearly indicate the source.

But this isn’t the only method of attribution used in the digital world — publishers are trying different tactics, and audience expectations may be changing as well. During a recent Poynter and MediaShift symposium on journalism ethics in the digital age, Tom Rosenstiel, former Project for Excellence in Journalism director and current executive director of the American Press Institute, said that the norms and ethics of journalism “have come from the streets,” adding that “audience has been the determiner of what works.”

Aggregation and curation, two techniques that often overlap, have become popular forms of publishing — and places where problems with attribution often arise.… Read more

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Computer keyboard keys used CTRL, C and V for copy and paste. (Depositphotos)

Getting digital attribution right, Part 1

Control+C, Control+V.

These two simple keystrokes — copy, paste — have created a culture that makes it easy for online publishers to share others’ content and use it in their own work. Much of this sharing and reuse is done appropriately, but sometimes the way a work is credited may not meet traditional standards for attribution.

Most people agree on a definition of plagiarism: It’s a verbatim republication of work that was originally published elsewhere, without clear attribution to the original publication. But ask how to apply that definition to practices and things get murky. Some say any use of more than seven words should be attributed. Others say attribution becomes necessary when more than two sentences are used. Applying that definition to the online publishing world introduces even more gray areas.… Read more

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Raul Ramirez died Friday at age 67. He was a Poynter Ethics Fellow and served as visiting faculty for the 2006 Leadership Academy. (Jim Stern)

Journalist Raul Ramirez dies at 67

 

Raul Ramirez died Friday at age 67. He was a Poynter Ethics Fellow and served as visiting faculty for the 2006 Leadership Academy.

San Francisco Chronicle | San Jose Mercury News

Raul Ramirez, a widely respected journalist and educator whose investigations delved into some of society’s most troubling issues, died Friday, the San Francisco Chronicle reported.

Ramirez passed away at his Berkeley home following a diagnosis in July of esophageal cancer, the newspaper said in a story Friday. He served most recently as executive director of news and public affairs at KQED Public Radio. His stories included examinations of conditions in jail where he worked as a deputy sheriff and of the hard lives of farm laborers with whom he worked in the fields.

But arguably the biggest risk Mr.

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