Articles about "Facebook"


Embeds of Facebook posts up 50 percent since launch of FB Newswire

Facebook’s already one of the most crucial street corners on the web for hawking news, and here’s an indication it might be gaining traction as a place for gathering news, too: 50 percent more Facebook posts were embedded around the web in the three months after FB Newswire’s launch than in the three months before.

When it debuted in April, the free service from Facebook and Storyful promised to surface verified, newsworthy Facebook posts. It feels best suited for news organizations without the need or ability to pay for sophisticated third-party discovery tools.

The time period since FB Newswire was introduced includes the World Cup — 350 million users generated 3 billion interactions related to the event, according to Facebook — and fighting in Ukraine, Gaza and Iraq, major world news stories.

Facebook is the dominant social media platform in the Middle East, said Liz Heron, head of news partnerships. More than 90 percent of Internet users in five Middle East countries use Facebook, according to a study from Northwestern and the Doha Film Institute. So although you’re still more likely to see Twitter embeds on news stories around the web, user-generated Facebook content is particularly useful for stories from those areas. (Facebook only introduced the ability to embed posts about a year ago.)

For example, Mashable has recently embedded Facebook posts about fighting in Gaza alongside Instagram videos, YouTube videos and tweets. Yahoo News linked to Facebook content from a father whose daughter was killed in the Malaysia Airlines plane that was shot down in Ukraine, and the photo taken by a passenger before he boarded the flight was published by news organizations from ABC News to Business Insider.

Last night, FB Newswire started compiling statements about the death of Robin Williams:

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There are two big reasons news organizations should pay attention to the content users are posting on Facebook.

One, of course, is scale. Despite journalists’ fascination with Twitter (which sometimes leads us to deemphasize Facebook), it has more than a billion-with-a-B fewer monthly active users than Facebook does. As Heron put it: “I firmly believe that news has been happening on Facebook every day for a while.” With that many users, how could it not?

The second reason is what Facebook allows users to posts. “You have more room to say what you want to say, and you can also say it in a variety of different ways,” Heron said. “You can write something short, you can write something long, you can say it with an image, you can say it with a video, you can say it with five images.”

The maximum number of images you can post on Twitter at a time is four. Lengthy videos — like this one of a hot-air balloon crashing into power lines — and long statements from celebrities and government officials are poor fits for Twitter for obvious reasons. But they work on Facebook.

After more than three months of FB Newswire, “We’re definitely not looking at the number of likes on a post as a measure of success here,” Heron told me. That makes sense. News organizations that choose to embed a FB Newswire post or link to it probably aren’t going to like it or comment on it.

And while the fact that 50 percent more posts have been embedded since the launch can’t be tied directly to FB Newswire — an increase would have been likely anyway due to the news cycle — the embed statistic doesn’t account for other ways news organizations are taking advantage of the platform, like showcasing footage within their own videos or posting screenshots instead of embeds.

It’s unclear how much more sophisticated FB Newswire can become without cutting into Storyful’s core business of making verified content discoverable, but the ability to search and filter FB Newswire content would go a long way toward making it a more important destination for journalists who struggle to take advantage of the 1.3 billion potential sources on Facebook.


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Related: Facebook and Storyful launch new ‘newswire’ for journalists Read more

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Earns Gannett

Gannett spins off, Murdoch and Time Warner square off

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Gannett will split publishing, broadcast assets: Its acquistion of broadcast companies and the 73 percent of Cars.com it didn’t own make this “the right time for a separation,” CEO Gracia Martore says in a statement. Robert J. Dickey will run the publishing company, which be called Gannett and will hold USA Today and 81 dailies, plus the U.K.’s Newsquest. (Poynter) | Just yesterday, Ken Doctor asked whether Gannett would be the next big media company to split its assets. (Nieman) | Rick Edmonds explained the rash of splits last week. Newspaper groups can “theoretically do better with management whose exclusive focus is on the particular challenges of that industry,” he wrote. (Poynter)
  2. Let us now observe Rupert Murdoch’s mating dance: Time Warner’s “unyielding stance has at least some analysts wondering if an acquisition really is inevitable,” Jonathan Mahler writes. The company is “trying to stir up doubts about the prospects of a combined entity, underscoring the potential for regulatory concerns and playing up the possibility of a culture clash between the generally liberal, purely public Time Warner, and the conservative, essentially family-run Fox.” (NYT) | Both companies announce earnings tomorrow. | Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox “is expected to make an aggressive case for merging with Time Warner Inc during its quarterly earnings call,” Jennifer Saba writes. Time Warner “will be on the hook to explain why it is better off going solo.” (Reuters) | Viacom, CBS and Disney also announce earnings this week. “All major media companies reporting this week are expected to show some weakness in their advertising business,” Amol Sharma writes. (WSJ)
  3. Mobile traffic dropped 8.5 percent during Facebook outage: And desktop traffic increased 3.5 percent. “While we certainly can’t claim that the outage was the cause of that uptick in desktop traffic, the timing is certainly notable,” Josh Schwartz writes, saying there was a “9% increase in homepage direct traffic on sites with loyal homepage followings.” (Chartbeat) | “Four takeaways from Facebook’s outage for publishers” (The Media Briefing) | Vaguely related: Google News launches a center for publishers. Here’s how it says to get the most out of it. (Google)
  4. The newspaper in the “middle” of the Gaza war: Haaretz “has the most potential for bridging across biases and political barriers” in coverage of the conflict, Gilad Lotan writes. (Medium) | “Unfortunately, Ha’aretz is struggling, squeezed both by the general decline of print newspapers and the growing rightward tilt of Israeli opinion.” (Quartz)
  5. Journalism Diversity Project relaunches: A list of journalists for bosses who say they can’t find qualified minority applicants. “Who makes the list? People of color, committing acts of journalism, and pushing the craft forward in the digital age.” (Journalism Diversity Project) | BACK IN 2011: “How a Twitter chat led to an online minority talent bank” (Poynter)
  6. The Washington Post announced its sale to Jeff Bezos a year ago today: Former owner Don Graham “has had a big burden lifted off him and he is very focused on looking forward and not back,” Slate chairman Jacob Weisberg tells Christine Haughney. (NYT) | FLASHBACK: Here’s audio of Graham’s announcement to Post staffers. (Poynter)
  7. Anchor faces charges: KTXL anchor Sabrina Rodriguez was charged with stealing wallets at a Coach store in Folsom, California. (Sacramento Bee) | “Her fiancé is behind bars on drug and arson charges.” (CBS Sacramento) | Rodriguez has taken leave. (KTXL)
  8. Leave James Risen alone: Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and Committee to Protect Journalists back a petition supporting the New York Times reporter. (CJR)
  9. “Selfie” and “bromance” will get the headlines: But true Scrabble players know the real news is that the Scrabble dictionary now has four new two-letter words. (AP)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Hatzel Vela will be a reporter for WPLG in Miami. Formerly, he was a reporter with WJLA in the Washington, D.C. area. Nina Judar will be beauty director for More magazine. Formerly, she was beauty director for Good Housekeeping. (Meredith Corporation) | Jessica Torres will be deputy editor of Siempre Mujer. Formerly, she was lifestyle editor there. (Meredith Corporation) | Eric Ulken will be executive director for digital strategy for Interstate General Media. Currently, he is product director at Seattletimes.com. (Philly.com) | Jeff Bergin has been named vice president of vertical strategy at Hearst Newspapers. Previously, he was senior vice president of advertising sales at the San Francisco Chronicle. (Hearst.com) | Mark Ellis has been named senior vice president of corporate sales for Time Inc. Previously, he was vice president of North American sales at Yahoo. (Time Inc.) | Kelly Cobiella has been named London correspondent for NBC News. Previously, she’d been a correspondent for both ABC News and CBS News. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: Mozilla is looking for freelance tech reporters for Mozilla Voices. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

Note: A previous version of this story incorrectly said that Jessica Torres will be deputy beauty director of Siempre Mujer. In fact, she will be deputy editor. Read more

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Chartbeat: Mobile traffic dropped 8.5 percent during Friday’s Facebook outage

Chartbeat

Facebook’s 19-minute outage on Friday corresponded to a 3 percent drop in traffic at news sites, according to Chartbeat chief data scientist Josh Schwartz:

In a blog post, Schwartz observes a decrease in mobile traffic correlated with the Facebook outage:

As I discussed in my last post, a huge percentage of mobile traffic comes from Facebook. Given that, we’d probably expect mobile traffic to be hardest hit during the outage. And, indeed, entrances to sites on mobile devices were down 8.5%, when comparing the minute before the outage to the lowest point while Facebook was down.

Traffic to desktop sites, meanwhile, actually increased by 3.5 percent, Schwartz noted: “While we certainly can’t claim that the outage was the cause of that uptick in desktop traffic, the timing is certainly notable.” Read more

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World Cup was most talked-about sporting event in Facebook history

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— At journalism.co.uk, Abigail Edge rounds up seven tips from Google’s Dan Russell on how to use search more effectively in your newsgathering — including how to use Google Trends, and when it makes sense to search by color.

— AllFacebook’s David Cohen reports that “350 million Facebook users generated 3 billion interactions” during the 2014 FIFA World Cup, “making it the most-talked-about sporting event in the social network’s history.”

— Nieman Lab’s Joseph Lichterman explains how some news organizations “are stashing staff around the world to keep content fresh.” The rise of mobile means “readers are demanding news content earlier and earlier, and that doesn’t line up with how most newsroom schedules have traditionally been structured.” Read more

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Google removes Guardian, BBC search results; Facebook drives 25% of Hearst’s traffic

— Google has notified The Guardian and BBC that certain articles will no longer appear in European searches, Mark Scott writes at The New York Times Bits blog. A European court ruling allows people “to ask for links to information about themselves to be removed from search results.”

— As news organizations fail to take advantage of the surge in mobile ad spending, Poynter’s Rick Edmonds says his hunch “is that getting video right and getting stronger mobile ad performance will go hand in hand for news sites.”

— Facebook drives 25 percent of traffic to Hearst magazines, up from 4 percent last year. Lucia Moses explains the publisher’s new focus on Facebook at Digiday.

— Vice Media will move to a larger Brooklyn headquarters, Laura Kusisto reports in The Wall Street Journal. The company’s $6.5 million in state tax credits will be tied to the creation of 525 new jobs in the next five years.

— Slate’s Will Oremus takes Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg to task for a “non-apology apology” that’s “as incoherent as it is disingenuous.” Sandberg said the company’s emotion-manipulation study was “poorly communicated.”


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What makes a tweet likely to be retweeted? Plus, mobile ad revenue to surpass newspapers

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day, and from Kristen Hare, a world roundup):

— What makes a tweet likely to be retweeted? An algorithm developed at Cornell thinks it knows, and you can test your predictive powers against it in an interactive quiz at The New York Times by Mike Bostock, Josh Katz and Nilkanth Patel.

— According to eMarketer, revenue from smartphone and tablet ads will surpass revenue from radio, magazine and newspaper ads for the first time this year, Robert Hof writes at Forbes. Mobile will still trail television and desktop/laptop ad revenue, though.

— Mashable’s Brian Ries has a roundup of fascinating Twitter data from yesterday’s U.S.-Belgium World Cup match.

— SCOTUSblog got 20,000 new Twitter followers on Monday after engaging with users who thought the Supreme Court blog’s account was an official Supreme Court account. American Journalism Review’s Cory Blair has a Q&A with SCOTUSblog publisher Tom Goldstein.

— Facebook did its icky emotion-manipulation study for the benefit of you, the customer, Megan Garber of The Atlantic reports from the Aspen Ideas Festival. Said Monika Bickert, head of global policy management: “Most of the research that is done on Facebook—if you walk around campus and you listen to the engineers talking—is all about … ‘How do we better suit the needs of the population using this product, and how do we show them more of what they want to see, and less of what they don’t want to see?’”

— Gawker editor-in-chief Max Read wants internal staff chats to be less of a “time waste,” so he’s making them public. Caroline O’Donovan explores Gawker’s new Disputations vertical at Nieman Lab.


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‘Retro’ email newsletters are ‘taking off’; Facebook blasted for News Feed study

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— “Newsletters are clicking because readers have grown tired of the endless stream of information on the Internet,” David Carr of The New York Times writes, “and having something finite and recognizable show up in your inbox can impose order on all that chaos.”

— “With great data comes great responsibility,” Max Nisen explains at Quartz. Facebook is in hot water over a study that “skewed the positive or negative emotional content that appeared in the news feeds of nearly 700,000 users over the course of a week.”

— The Associated Press is embracing software-generated business stories, enabling it to produce 4,400 robo-stories rather than 300 human-written ones, Andrew Beaujon reports at Poynter. But AP Managing Editor Lou Ferrara says the move doesn’t mean job cuts.

— Here’s an idea for how to save Time Inc., from M. Scott Havens, senior vice president of digital: create the next Facebook or LinkedIn. Ben Cardew writes up an interview with Havens at The Guardian.

— Streaming video services are looking to take advantage after rival Aereo lost its case before the Supreme Court last week, Emily Steel writes in The New York Times.


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Sighs of relief from local TV news over Aereo decision? Plus Android’s ‘connected universe’

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— Google laid out its vision of a “connected universe” of Android devices — with the phone in the center and Android Wear watches and Android Auto-equipped cars connected to it — at its annual I/O conference. Re/code’s Liz Gannes has a report.

The Moto 360 by Motorola, an Android Wear smartwatch, on the demo floor at Google I/O in San Francisco on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

The Moto 360 by Motorola, an Android Wear smartwatch, on the demo floor at Google I/O in San Francisco on Wednesday. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

— The broadcasters’ win over Aereo in the Supreme Court yesterday means “local TV news likely dodged disaster,” Sarah Laskow explains at Columbia Journalism Review.

— Medium has hired tech writer Steven Levy as Twitter co-founder Evan Williams‘ new site “moves from platform to publisher,” David Carr reports in The New York Times. (Happily, there’s no sign of the term “platisher” in that story.)

— “Worldwide, men hold 77 percent of top jobs” at Facebook, Chris Welch writes at The Verge. “That’s only slightly better than Google, where 79 percent of leadership positions are filled by men.”

— American Press Institute’s Lisa Zimmermann has a Q&A with Tom Negrete, director of innovation and news operations for the Sacramento Bee, which has partnered with Stanford and other universities “on using data to create personalized approaches and systems to better serve readers and advertisers.”

— As Snapchat debuts a public “Our Story” feature, PandoDaily’s Michael Carney says “it’s starting to look like Snapchat saying no to an almost incomprehensible $3 billion acquisition offer may have actually been a great idea.”

— Twitter users send more than 500 million tweets per day. But accessing historical tweets for research purposes is no easy — or inexpensive — task, Kelly Fincham explains for Poynter.


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The Day in Digital: Inside the New York Times CMS and the impending Amazon phone

Content management systems are so in this season. Luke Vnenchak has a fascinating look inside Scoop, The New York Times’s “homegrown digital and (soon-to-be) print CMS.”

Jeff Bezos is expected to announce an Amazon smartphone today. How can the company compete with Apple, Android and Samsung? Quartz’s Dan Frommer has some thoughts on the strategy.

The Atlantic’s in good shape, for lots of reasons. Here’s another one, from a Jeff Sonderman tweet during American Press Institute’s summit on video:

Media critics weren’t critical enough of Aaron Kushner’s print-centric strategy at the Orange County Register, Clay Shirky writes, helping to poison the minds of young people who need to understand that print is in a death spiral from which it can’t recover.

“Do you really need another app for sharing photos and videos with your friends?” Ina Fried asks at Re/code as Facebook releases its new Snapchat competitor, Slingshot.

At PBS MediaShift, Dorian Benkoil explores efforts by Chartbeat, Upworthy, the Financial Times and more to measure “what advertisers and publishers really want — people actually paying attention.”

Yahoo revealed its worldwide workplace diversity. Employees are overwhelmingly white and Asian, and 62 percent male.


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Facebook and Twitter Applications on Ipad

Social media roundup: Gawker, USA Today, LA Times open up with tips and insights

Automated tweets get less engagement than handcrafted ones, WhatsApp is making inroads at a USA Today sports site, and sometimes all you can do when a years-old piece takes off on Facebook is shrug.

It’s been a good week for gleaning insights from media outlets, which seem increasingly willing to share which social strategies are working for them. Here’s a rundown of recent social media news you might have missed:

Human tweets RSS tweets

Los Angeles Times social media editor Stacey Leasca shared some tips on Twitter’s media blog this week.

Among her insights was the fact that moving from RSS tweets improved engagement. It’s no surprise that a human touch makes a difference, but it’s interesting to see how much the change seems to have increased the rate at which the newspaper’s accounts are gaining new followers:

A perfect example of this is, again, @LANow. We moved @LANow off of an automated feed in the summer of 2013. The account was then staffed by editors and reporters working in the section. They are our real local experts and the Twitter account quickly became richer with information and much more personal for Angelenos. @LANow quickly went from averaging about 1,500 fans a week to more than 2,500 fans a week.

Few big news outlets use automated tweets

Late last week, Nieman Lab’s Joseph Lichterman gathered a few paragraphs from seven major news outlets about how they manage their Twitter and Facebook accounts. Only one, The New York Times, indicated much reliance on automation. Here’s Daniel Victor, social media staff editor:

By most measures — including clicks, retweets, favorites, and responses — handwritten tweets outperform autotweets. But there are some not-insignificant areas where autotweets win: speed, reliability, and lesser time invested by staff. We aim to have a balance of the two that gives us the benefits of both; it allows us to be both timely and engaging, while still being able to spend time on additional newsroom priorities.

I’ve noticed Times tweets generally seem very by-the-book, to the extent that the occasional tweet with a human flair seems jarring (the tell is that they’re written down-style instead of up-style, as Times headlines are). The Wall Street Journal, perhaps its chief competitor, has embraced pictures and charts on Twitter, and is much more conversational at times. The Journal also liberally retweets its reporters. It’s fascinating to see how much the two newspapers — still somewhat staid in print and on their websites — diverge when it comes to social media.

Ryan Osborn, NBCUniversal News Group vice president of innovation and strategic integration, echoed most of the other outlets’ reasons for choosing not to automate social media posts: “While scaling a strategy 24/7 has taken time, we’ve found that engagement is greater when the accounts are manually curated.”

What’s up with WhatsApp?

After Facebook’s acquisition of the messenger platform in February, I wrote that WhatsApp could become a useful tool for “dark social” content sharing — in other words, an alternative to email for sharing links privately rather than publicly. BuzzFeed had already started experimenting with a WhatsApp button in stories on the mobile Web.

Now, Digiday’s Ricardo Bilton reports that USA Today’s viral, mobile-friendly sports site, FTW, saw 18 percent of its mobile sharing activity come from WhatsApp in its first week of using the WhatsApp share button. That’s more than Twitter:

Sites with sizable youth audiences and content built to be shared should take heed.

The mystery of evergreen Facebook stories

Finally, Gawker editor-in-chief Max Read explored a question today about his site’s traffic: “Why Is Gawker’s Top Story a Four-Year-Old Post About Vajazzling?” Of the post’s near-million page views this week, 96 percent came from Facebook, Read shows in charts and tables. And the traffic pattern for this type of second-life virality differs from what Gawker sees for its daily posts:

Regular, diversified traffic on a decent hit is a quick burst immediately after publication, tapering off throughout the day, a smaller peak for the next day, another valley and on until it flatlines. It hits its peaks around midday and early afternoon, when office workers are at the computers.

Facebook traffic, on the other hand, is a steady rise that doesn’t peak until around 10 p.m. eastern time (and drops off immediately). Weirder still, it gets bigger: Wednesday night, the post was receiving around 7,000 hits an hour at its peak; Thursday, it was hitting 8,000.

Tweets are ephemeral, disappearing from timelines almost as quickly as they appear. But Facebook posts often hang around, and some brands, like Mental Floss, have observed longer shelf lives for posts since the latest News Feed shakeup.

As far as determining what “patient zero” launched Gawker’s four-year-old viral sensation goes, Read wrote that all he could was shrug: ¯\(°_o)/¯


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