Articles about "Fact Checking"


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Poynter to hold Global Fact-Checking Summit in London

With fact-checking growing around the world, the Poynter Institute will convene the first Global Fact-Checking Summit, to be held in June in London.

The conference, at the London School of Economics on June 9-10, will bring together about 40 fact-checkers from places such as South Africa, Italy, Great Britain, Germany, India, the United States, South America and Eastern Europe.

Fact-checking is expanding rapidly around the globe, according to a new analysis from the Duke University Reporters’ Lab. The Duke study found 59 sites that have been active in the last few years, including 44 currently in operation.

About half of the sites are affiliated with newspapers, television networks or other legacy media organizations. The other half are run by startup companies or not-for-profit groups. Twenty-seven have started in the past two years.

The Global Fact-Checking Summit is sponsored by the National Endowment for Democracy, the Ford Foundation, Omidyar Network, the Duke Reporters’ Lab, the British fact-checking site Full Fact, and craigconnects, the Web-based initiative to support philanthropy and public service run by Craig Newmark, founder of craigslist.

Topics will include the growth and challenges of fact-checking, the best techniques for researching claims, the pros and cons of rating systems, the use of crowdsourcing and the need to find sustainable business models.

“Fact-checking is quickly becoming an important new form of accountability journalism,” said Poynter President Tim Franklin. “Poynter will play a leading role to help journalists do their best work and foster the growth of fact checking, which is vital to democracies around the world.”

The conference also represents Poynter’s strategy to greatly expand its training initiatives across the globe. Last month, Poynter led a series of seminars for journalists in India. Later this month, the institute will formally announce the launch of a training project for Turkish journalists. The project includes e-learning courses through NewsU Turkiye, a certificate program and a fellowship that will bring up to 20 Turkish journalists to Poynter in the fall.

Presenters at the fact-checking conference will include editors from PolitiFact, the Pulitzer Prize-winning site in the United States, and Chequeado, an independent fact-checking site in Argentina, as well as Lucas Graves, a University of Wisconsin professor who is writing a book about the rise of fact-checking, and Bill Adair, a Duke University professor and adjunct faculty member at Poynter.

For more information about the conference, contact Bill Adair at bill.adair@duke.edu.

Related training: Getting it Right: Accuracy and Verification in the Digital Age | Don't Get Fooled Again: Best Practices for Online Verification | How to Keep Misinformation from Spreading | Growing Trust and Engagement With Local News Audiences | Making the Case for Fact-Checking in Your Newsroom | Political Fact-Checking: Tips and Tricks for the 2012 Election

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Leonardo DiCaprio

Washington Post expands fact-checking project — and not just to movie trailers

U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and Leonardo DiCaprio are getting the same fact-checking treatment thanks to the latest evolution of The Washington Post’s Truth Teller project.

The actor and the senator each figure prominently in new videos produced by Truth … Read more

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How PolitiFact gets ready for ‘the Super Bowl for fact-checkers’

The president's State of the Union address is "the Super Bowl for fact-checkers," former PolitiFact honcho Bill Adair tells a video crew at his new employer, Duke University.

PolitiFact -- which is owned by the Tampa Bay Times, which in turn is owned by Poynter -- gets a copy of the speech a few minutes before the U.S. House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms shouts "Mr. Speaker." Via instant message, PolitiFact editors assign reporters to specific sections of the speech.

The editors then gather in PolitiFact's "Star Chamber" and hand out Truth-o-Meter ratings, Adair says. Related: YouTube, news sites will livestream the State of the Union | The White House wants to be your second screen for State of the Union address
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Washington Post honors researcher who has ‘shared more Pulitzer Prizes than anyone in the newsroom’

Washington Post researcher Julie Tate is among the winners of this year's Eugene Meyer Awards at the Washington Post, Post Publisher Katharine Weymouth tells staffers in an email. Tate "began her career at The Post occupying a seat in the very back of the newsroom -- in “the library” -- where the job was usually to locate newspaper clips and spell-check names for reporters writing stories," Weymouth writes.

But Julie had her own ideas about research, and they went far beyond what most reporters knew to ask for. They included original reporting that made links between events and people, people and addresses, people and people, and eventually secret things the government was trying to hide. For those reporters who spotted her unique skills, she was a gold mine. They would scheme to get her to work with them because they knew she would find facts and relationships they hadn’t even thought of.
Tate, Weymouth writes, has "shared more Pulitzer Prizes than anyone in the newsroom; in 2005 alone her name was on four of the six won by The Washington Post that year," In 2008, Erik Wemple, then the editor of Washington City Paper (where I worked with him), wrote about Tate, calling her an "Unsung Hero" on pieces like Dana Priest and Anne Hull's series on Walter Reed Hospital. Tate was previously a fact-checker at The New Yorker and gave a seminar there in fact-checking techniques after its senior editor Peter Canby heard her talk "about search programs she was using that I had never heard of,” he told Wemple. (more...)
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The gloves come off as journalists increasingly fact-check other journalists. (Depositphotos)

‘Gloves come off’ as journalists debunk each other’s Obamacare horror stories

When Los Angeles Times columnist Michael Hiltzik saw Deborah Cavallaro tell her story on television, something about it didn’t add up.

Cavallaro is a real-estate agent and investor in Westchester, Calif. She’s also become a minor media celebrity in the … Read more

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New PolitiFact service will fact-check pundits

PolitiFact PolitiFact will launch a service called PunditFact that will be "dedicated to checking claims by pundits, columnists, bloggers and the hosts and guests of talk shows." Poynter -- which owns the Tampa Bay Times that operates PolitiFact -- is a partner on the project. The Ford Foundation and the Democracy Fund are funding it with seed money from Craigslist founder Craig Newmark's group craigconnects. Poynter will analyze "the reach and impact of PunditFact and will hold a conference to discuss the results," the announcement says.
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Magnifying Glass - Facts

Researchers find politicians may fear fact-checkers

In the months before the 2012 election, state legislators in nine states received letters from two political scientists.

“We are writing to let you know about an important research project,” the letters began.

It wasn’t just a letter letting them … Read more

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Study about PolitiFact — OK to call it a study?

PolitiFact Editor Bill Adair was careful to call a study that claimed his shop "rates Republicans as less trustworthy than Democrats" a "press release" when I asked him for comment about it last week.

"The authors of this press release seem to have counted up a small number of our Truth-O-Meter ratings over a few months, and then drew their own conclusions,” Adair wrote. (Poynter owns the Tampa Bay Times, which owns PolitiFact.) I asked the spokesperson for George Mason University's Center for Media and Public Affairs for a copy of the full study, about which I had indeed received a press release. In return, CMPA spokesperson Kathryn Davis sent me the following tables: (more...)
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Michele Bachmann

Fact-checkers, copy editors on why they’ll be affected by Michele Bachmann’s retirement

U.S. Rep Michele Bachmann announced early Wednesday that she would not seek her seat next year, an announcement that will land hard on two constituencies: Fact-checkers and copy editors.



"She was great to cover because she was consistently and unapologetically wrong," Washington Post fact-checker Glenn Kessler told Poynter in an email. "But others will fill the breach, I am sure!" In a post bidding her adieu, Kessler wrote that Bachmann's absence "will leave the Capitol a much less interesting place to fact check." (more...)
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Study: PolitiFact finds Republicans ‘less trustworthy than Democrats’

Center for Media and Public Affairs
George Mason University's Center for Media and Public Affairs studied 100 PolitiFact fact-checks during President Obama's second term. The organization "rated Republican claims as false three times as often as Democratic claims," a press release says.

PolitiFact rated 32% of Republican claims as “false” or “pants on fire,” compared to 11% of Democratic claims – a 3 to 1 margin. Conversely, Politifact rated 22% of Democratic claims as “entirely true” compared to 11% of Republican claims – a 2 to 1 margin.

A majority of Democratic statements (54%) were rated as mostly or entirely true, compared to only 18% of Republican statements. Conversely, a majority of Republican statements (52%) were rated as mostly or entirely false, compared to only 24% of Democratic statements. (more...)
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