Articles about "Fareed Zakaria"


Why NYT journalists are essentially stuck in China

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Why New York Times journalists can’t leave China

    The country's visa backlog puts people currently stationed there "in an unenviable professional position: Should they leave their posts, they can be pretty sure at this point that their editor won’t be able to replace them." (WP) | "At a news conference in Beijing alongside President Obama, China’s leader, Xi Jinping, appeared to draw a link between unfavorable coverage and access for reporters, saying that the visa problems of news organizations were of their own making." (NYT) | NYT editorial: "A confident regime that considers itself a world leader should be able to handle truthful examination and criticism." (NYT)

  2. Washington Post appends multiple editor's notes to Zakaria columns

    David Folkenflik noticed they were up. (@davidfolkenflik). | Notes are on four of the six columns flagged by the mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort (1, 2, 3, 4).

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Ben Smith, @crushingbort and @blippoblappo talk about plagiarism

I teach a journalism ethics class at Duke University that focuses on issues of trust. I spend about half the semester exploring the pros and cons of anonymous sourcing, the other half on plagiarism and fabrication.

The plagiarism by Benny Johnson at BuzzFeed has not only prompted a new round of discussion about copying and pasting in the digital age, it involves an anonymous posse — two bloggers who call themselves @blippoblappo and @crushingbort. After BuzzFeed fired Johnson for 41 incidents of plagiarism, Blippo and Bort have been on a relentless crusade against columnist and CNN host Fareed Zakaria.

On Tuesday, BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith, Blippo and Bort spoke with my class in two separate conversations. Smith spoke first by Skype; Blippo and Bort opted for a Google chat to protect their identities.

Smith

Smith

Smith was forthright about the firing of Johnson, saying it was clearly plagiarism. “Presenting someone else’s words as your own is such a basic form of dishonesty,” he said. Read more

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NYT corrected Gary Hart story after source’s recollection changed

Good morning. Thanks, veterans. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. NYT corrects Gary Hart story

    Former Miami Herald reporter Tom Fiedler disputes the chronology he gave Matt Bai about when he saw Gary Hart's challenge to prove his infidelity. "Therefore, it is likely that the original version of this article, based in large part on Fiedler’s account, referred incorrectly to the point at which any of the Herald journalists first saw the Times article quoting Hart as saying, 'Follow me around,'" the correction reads. "The text has been adjusted accordingly." (NYT) | Bai: "I find it particularly disturbing that Fiedler, someone I'd very much admired, has now invented a new version of events after repeatedly and recently reconfirming his own longstanding account, which is something we as journalists often condemn in the people we cover." (HuffPost)

  2. Journalists and lawyers: A special legal mini-roundup

    ACLU sues St. Louis County police on behalf of Bilgin Şaşmaz, a Turkish journalist arrested in Ferguson in August.

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Fareed Zakaria

5 Zakaria articles are ‘problematic,’ Washington Post says

Our Bad Media | Newsweek

Washington Post editorial page Editor Fred Hiatt said five Fareed Zakaria articles “strike me as problematic in their absence of full attribution.”

Those five were part of six identified as unoriginal by the anonymous media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort in a post Monday. The posts contained plagiarism, patchwriting or material repurposed from press releases, they wrote.

In one instance, a Zakaria piece from August 2011 contains a passage identical to one in a Foreign Policy article. In another, lines in a 2012 column echo passages from a White House press release.

The five “problematic” articles, Hiatt told Poynter in an email, are “unfair to readers and to the original sources. We will take a fuller look over the next day or two, but we probably will attach messages to the archived editions of the five columns.”

Newsweek on Friday removed the editor’s note it had placed over Zakaria’s archives for that publication, placing individual corrections on “articles that Newsweek staffers felt warranted them.” (One such note says Zakaria’s work “borrows extensively from June 1, 2004 remarks by John Kerry without proper attribution.”)

Slate on Monday put an editor’s note on a 1998 Zakaria column that “failed to properly attribute quotations and information” from another piece. Read more

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Politico, AJC launch redesigns

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Politico, AJC launch redesigns

    Politico's new presentation aims to give readers a "cleaner, more organized design that seeks to crowd out some of the noise of our information overload moment," Editor Susan Glasser writes in a welcome note. (Politico) | "Today is the formal beginning of the biggest transformation of [Politico] in eight years," CEO Jim Vandehei writes in a memo to staffers. The publication's visual retooling echoes expansion plans "into Europe and other states," but VandeHei says "Washington will always be the central nervous system of [Politico]." | The Atlanta Journal-Constitution also has a new design, a "bold new look" that will spread to other Cox Media Group free newspaper sites, CMG says in a release. Take a tour: (AJC) | From June: "AJC reorganizes newsroom for digital with topic teams inspired by Quartz’s ‘obsessions’" (Poynter) Somewhat related to the Politico stuff: The Washington Post, whose publisher used to be president and COO of Politico, plans to get its journalists on TV more.

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Newsweek boss: ‘clearly enough’ examples to put editor’s note on Zakaria archive

On Monday Newsweek placed an editor’s note on Fareed Zakaria’s entire archive for the magazine. It says, “some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others.”

The anonymous critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort published a post Aug. 22 outlining what they said were instances of plagiarism in Zakaria’s 2008 book “The Post-American World” and in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs.

Reached by phone, Newsweek Editor-in-Chief Jim Impoco said simply, “The examples I saw were clearly enough for me to append a note.”

Impoco also took issue with the now-kind-of-bruited claim that he hadn’t answered a previous request for comment from Poynter about Zakaria articles that Newsweek published before he was editor and when a different company owned the magazine.

On Aug. 22, I contacted Foreign Affairs and W.W. Norton, which published “The Post-American World.” My coworker Ben Mullin emailed The Atlantic, where Zakaria was recently named a contributing editor, and Kate Gardiner, IBT’s director of social media and audience engagement, to ask if she’d pass on a message to Impoco that Poynter wanted comment. Read more

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Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person.
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Newsweek places editor’s note over Zakaria archives

This editor’s note now sits on Newsweek’s author page for Fareed Zakaria:

Fareed Zakaria worked for Newsweek when it was under previous ownership. Readers are advised that some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others. In addition, readers with information about articles by Mr. Zakaria that may purportedly lack proper attribution are asked to e-mail Newsweek at corrections@newsweek.com

Zakaria’s last story for Newsweek was published in September 2010, according to the archive. (The note is on that story, and others in the archive, as well.) IAC/Interactive sold Newsweek to the owners of the International Business Times last year.

Two anonymous online critics, @blippoblappo and @crushingbort, have peppered Zakaria with plagiarism charges, including some regarding his time at Newsweek. Read more

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The ‘One-Page Magazine’ is toast

mediawiremorningGood morning from Chicago, where the Poynter dot org crew is attending the 2014 Online News Association Conference. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ESPN benches Bill Simmons: The talking head and Grantland boss said on a podcast that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was a “liar” and “has no integrity whatsoever.” ESPN has removed the podcast. (NYT) | Richard Deitsch: “ESPN management is looking to become more decisive with suspensions when its employees go off the rails.” (SI)
  2. Forbes zaps contributor after stupid article: Bill Frezza‘s article “Drunk Female Guests Are the Gravest Threat To Fraternities” “was removed from Forbes.com almost immediately after he published it,” a Forbes spox tells Philip Caulfield. “Mr. Frezza is no longer a contributor to Forbes.com.” Frezza: “I stand by every word I wrote.” (NYDN) | Jessica Roy: “Only when we tackle the menace of drunk girls, who are absolutely getting themselves drunk while the sober brothers lock themselves in their rooms and study, can the fraternity system be restored to its rightful glory.” (NY Mag)
  3. NPR kills Robert Krulwich’s blog: “I can’t pretend.
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Why couldn’t any other media reporters bust Zakaria?

Esquire

Enigmatic plagiarism sleuths @blippoblappo and @crushingbort discussed their crusade against CNN’s Fareed Zakaria in Esquire Monday, highlighting the limp reaction their accusations have elicited from brass at CNN and elsewhere:

So why did we do it? Why didn’t anyone else? In the month that’s passed since our first post, no actual journalist has publicly followed up with further examples. And despite the scale and continuation of the plagiarism, the response from Zakaria and his bosses have been striking in their lack of honesty or any sense of obligation to viewers and readers. CNN, TIME, and the Washington Post’s editorial page editor Fred Hiatt were quick to give Zakaria their wholehearted support, while Newsweek, Foreign Affairs, Atlantic Media and publisher W.W. Norton have not even replied to requests by Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon for comment.

The bloggers also defended their decision to withhold their identities, saying their accusations were transparently sourced:

Nothing about who we are will give readers a deeper insight into the wide span of plagiarism committed by Fareed Zakaria, and nothing about them gives his massive theft a pass.

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