Articles about "Fareed Zakaria"


Newsweek boss: ‘clearly enough’ examples to put editor’s note on Zakaria archive

On Monday Newsweek placed an editor’s note on Fareed Zakaria’s entire archive for the magazine. It says, “some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others.”

The anonymous critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort published a post Aug. 22 outlining what they said were instances of plagiarism in Zakaria’s 2008 book “The Post-American World” and in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs.

Reached by phone, Newsweek Editor-in-Chief Jim Impoco said simply, “The examples I saw were clearly enough for me to append a note.”

Impoco also took issue with the now-kind-of-bruited claim that he hadn’t answered a previous request for comment from Poynter about Zakaria articles that Newsweek published before he was editor and when a different company owned the magazine.

On Aug. 22, I contacted Foreign Affairs and W.W. Norton, which published “The Post-American World.” My coworker Ben Mullin emailed The Atlantic, where Zakaria was recently named a contributing editor, and Kate Gardiner, IBT’s director of social media and audience engagement, to ask if she’d pass on a message to Impoco that Poynter wanted comment. Gardiner confirms she forwarded him that message, but Impoco said he had expected to see a followup message from Poynter after that.

So just an update for those keeping score on this game of inside baseball: Newsweek and Poynter have now talked after Poynter first launched that star-crossed search for comment. No reply from Norton or Foreign Affairs yet. Poynter has been in touch with Atlantic Media, but it hasn’t yet offered any comment. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
  2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person. (Minneapolis City Pages)
  3. Esquire botches attack on ESPN: There was no all-male domestic violence panel planned, ESPN said Monday. (Deadspin) | Esquire apologized for that and for “saying that ESPN is not in the business of journalism,” Hearst Digital editorial director Kate Lewis writes in a note on the piece. Esquire is owned by Hearst, which has a 20 percent stake in ESPN, Jeremy Barr reports. “A Hearst spokesperson did not respond directly to a Capital inquiry about whether the company’s investment in ESPN played a role in the apology.” (Capital) | Despite the apology, Esquire kept a sentence that said “ESPN is not a company in the business of journalism” in the story until later that evening. (WP) | Craig Silverman finds articles with the erroneous information were shared far more widely than articles that corrected it. (Emergent)
  4. Roxane Gay will edit cultural criticism site: The Toast has hired the bestselling author to head up a new site called The Butter. (Capital) | Not at all related but this was the only item I could wedge it into: Piers Morgan will write commentary for Daily Mail Online. (Politico)
  5. Newsweek places editor’s note over Zakaria archives: “Fareed Zakaria worked for Newsweek when it was under previous ownership,” the note, which also rides along on Zakaria’s archived articles, says. “Readers are advised that some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others.” (Poynter) | “New Fun Trawling Through Fareed Zakaria’s @Newsweek Archives, Part 1″ (@blippoblappo)
  6. Will Bill Simmons stay at ESPN? He “did not think that what he said or how he said it was worthy of one of the harshest suspensions in ESPN history,” John Ourand reported Friday in a tick-tock of how ESPN decided to put its star on ice. Simmons’ contract will be up next year, Ourand writes, and “it will be interesting to see whether this suspension derails those talks.” (SportsBusiness Daily) | The clash reflects a generational conflict at ESPN, Jason McIntyre reported Friday. “The old guard has its fingers crossed they can pester and annoy Simmons to the point that he pulls the trigger on a plan they claim he’s been mulling after spending so much time in Hollywood: decamp from ESPN to a venture capital-backed solo operation with contributions from his West Coast buddies Jimmy Kimmel and Adam Carolla.” (The Big Lead) | Erik Wemple: Suspensions “are effective primarily in forgetting and neglecting the root causes of the stupidity that materializes on air.” (WP)
  7. Chartbeat can now measure readers’ attention: The Media Ratings Council has approved Chartbeat’s bid to measure attention rather than pageviews or unique visitors. (Gigaom) | “If you’re dealing with something where you can prove attention better, you can charge more,” Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile tells Andrew Nusca. (Fortune) | Haile noted in February that there is “effectively no correlation between social shares and people actually reading.” (The Verge) | Rick Edmonds in March: “Time to ditch uniques and page views for engagement in measuring digital audiences” (Poynter)
  8. RIP Joe Nawrozki: The investigative reporter worked for three Baltimore newspapers, dug up political corruption among pols, and “taught martial arts for more than 40 years.” He died Saturday. He was 70. (The Baltimore Sun)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Taiwan’s Apple Daily fronts the Hong Kong protests. (Courtesy Newseum)

    appledaily_09302014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ann Shoket will be a consultant for Hearst. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of Seventeen magazine. (Capital) | Kal Penn will be a special correspondent for Fusion. Previously, he was associate director of the White House’s Office of Public Engagement. (Politico) | Richard Tomko is now publisher of amNewYork. Previously, he was a consultant at Boost Digital. (Email) | Tony Brancato is now executive director of Web products and audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he was head of product for the Web there. (The New York Times) | Sandy Johnson is now president and chief operating officer at The National Press Foundation. Previously, she was the excecutive editor at Stateline.org. (National Press Foundation) | Jeff Simon will be a video producer at CNN. He’s a producer for The Washington Post. (@jjsimonWP) | Cynthia Littleton will be Variety’s managing editor for television. Previously, she was editor-in-chief of television. Claudia Eller and Andrew Wallenstein are now co-editors-in-chief at Variety. Eller was editor-in-chief of film at Variety. Wallenstein was editor-in-chief of digital there. (Variety) | Sonya Thompson will be director of news projects for Tribune Media Group. She was news director for WJW in Cleveland. Mitch Jacob will be news director at WJLA. He was news director for WSYX in Columbus. Jamie Justice will be news director at WSYX in Columbus. Previously, she was assistant news director there. Rob Cartwright is now news director for KEYE in Austin. Previously, he was news director for WSYR in Syracuse. Jeff Houston is now news director for WBMA in Birmingham. Previously, he was an assistant news director there. (Rick Gevers) | James VanOsdol has been named newsroom program manager at Rivet News Radio. He is an anchor at HearHere Radio LLC. (Robert Feder) | Job of the day: Politico is looking for a tax reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Newsweek places editor’s note over Zakaria archives

This editor’s note now sits on Newsweek’s author page for Fareed Zakaria:

Fareed Zakaria worked for Newsweek when it was under previous ownership. Readers are advised that some of his articles have been the subject of complaints claiming that they contain material that should have been attributed to others. In addition, readers with information about articles by Mr. Zakaria that may purportedly lack proper attribution are asked to e-mail Newsweek at corrections@newsweek.com

Zakaria’s last story for Newsweek was published in September 2010, according to the archive. (The note is on that story, and others in the archive, as well.) IAC/Interactive sold Newsweek to the owners of the International Business Times last year.

Two anonymous online critics, @blippoblappo and @crushingbort, have peppered Zakaria with plagiarism charges, including some regarding his time at Newsweek. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

The ‘One-Page Magazine’ is toast

mediawiremorningGood morning from Chicago, where the Poynter dot org crew is attending the 2014 Online News Association Conference. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. ESPN benches Bill Simmons: The talking head and Grantland boss said on a podcast that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell was a “liar” and “has no integrity whatsoever.” ESPN has removed the podcast. (NYT) | Richard Deitsch: “ESPN management is looking to become more decisive with suspensions when its employees go off the rails.” (SI)
  2. Forbes zaps contributor after stupid article: Bill Frezza‘s article “Drunk Female Guests Are the Gravest Threat To Fraternities” “was removed from Forbes.com almost immediately after he published it,” a Forbes spox tells Philip Caulfield. “Mr. Frezza is no longer a contributor to Forbes.com.” Frezza: “I stand by every word I wrote.” (NYDN) | Jessica Roy: “Only when we tackle the menace of drunk girls, who are absolutely getting themselves drunk while the sober brothers lock themselves in their rooms and study, can the fraternity system be restored to its rightful glory.” (NY Mag)
  3. NPR kills Robert Krulwich’s blog: “I can’t pretend. I’m sorry to have to move on.” (NPR) | NPR’s statement to Poynter’s Ben Mullin: “As [Radiolab] has grown, it has consumed a larger share of [Krulwich's] time. … Robert expects to continue his signature work for WNYC, including hosting Radiolab which is heard by millions on public radio stations across the country.”
  4. What went wrong at The Wire? Former editor Gabriel Snyder says he “always considered The Wire a great success story,” Justin Ellis reports. “I’m sorry to see the leadership of The Atlantic didn’t see it that way.” (Nieman)
  5. The Ethicist abides: But the “One-Page Magazine” and “Who Made That” are toast as new New York Times Magazine editor Jake Silverstein cleans “up the book in anticipation of the redesign,” Joe Pompeo reports. (Capital)
  6. Weisberg v. Blappo: Slate Group honcho Jacob Weisberg called @blippoblappo and @crushingbort‘s most recent docket of charges against Fareed Zakaria “silly.” In response, they put a 1998 Zakaria column for Slate under their microscope. (Our Bad Media) | Weisberg retweeted Jesse Eisinger: “.@jacobwe is right & @blippoblappo is wrong on this new Fareed Zakaria plagiarism accusation. Also: it’s trivial.” (@eisingerj) | A little further down in Eisinger’s responses: “Generally, I think plagiarism is a low order journalism crime.”
  7. After Stanley/Rhimes affair, reflections: “Are critics – some of whom are big-name stars – subject to rigorous and questioning editing, or is there a hands-off approach?” NYT Public Editor Margaret Sullivan writes. Executive Editor Dean Baquet tells her diversity is “an issue and we need to work on it.” (NYT) | Baquet reorged the Times’ masthead yesterday, eliminating the position of managing editor and elevating four people to “deputy executive editor.” (NYT) | Baquet’s memo to staff. (Poynter)
  8. It’s not too late to vote for salvo! Poynter dot org yesterday settled on a list of words that are often written, never spoken. Please vote for one to ban forever. Ballyhoo is currently winning; results later today. (Poynter)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Via David Shedden‘s media-history post this morning, the Sept. 25, 1690, front of Publick Occurrences Both Forreign and Domestick.

    Publick-Occurrences-2 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Susan Chira is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. Previously, she was an assistant managing editor there. Janet Elder is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. Previously, she was a deputy managing editor there. Matt Purdy is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. He was an assistant managing editor there. Ian Fisher is now a deputy executive editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was an assistant managing editor there. Steve Duenes is now an assistant editor at the New York Times. Previously, he was graphics director there. Clifford Levy is an associate editor at the New York Times. He is the head of NYT Now. Alexandra MacCallum is now an assistant editor at The New York Times. Previously, she was an assistant managing editor there. Tom Bodkin is now creative director at The New York Times. Previously, he was a deputy managing editor there. Joe Kahn will be assistant editor for international at The New York Times. Previously, he was foreign editor there. (The New York Times) | Bill Mulvihill is now associate publisher at The Atlantic. Previously, he was national advertising director for Vanity Fair. (Email) | Roxanna Sherwood is now executive producer of “Nightline.” Previously, she was a senior producer on “20/20.” (TV Newser) | Job of the day:The Charleston Daily Mail is looking for a statehouse reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Hey hey, ONA: Gimme a shout if you’re here! @abeaujon/abeaujon@poynter.org/703-594-1103.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Why couldn’t any other media reporters bust Zakaria?

Esquire

Enigmatic plagiarism sleuths @blippoblappo and @crushingbort discussed their crusade against CNN’s Fareed Zakaria in Esquire Monday, highlighting the limp reaction their accusations have elicited from brass at CNN and elsewhere:

So why did we do it? Why didn’t anyone else? In the month that’s passed since our first post, no actual journalist has publicly followed up with further examples. And despite the scale and continuation of the plagiarism, the response from Zakaria and his bosses have been striking in their lack of honesty or any sense of obligation to viewers and readers. CNN, TIME, and the Washington Post’s editorial page editor Fred Hiatt were quick to give Zakaria their wholehearted support, while Newsweek, Foreign Affairs, Atlantic Media and publisher W.W. Norton have not even replied to requests by Poynter’s Andrew Beaujon for comment.

The bloggers also defended their decision to withhold their identities, saying their accusations were transparently sourced:

Nothing about who we are will give readers a deeper insight into the wide span of plagiarism committed by Fareed Zakaria, and nothing about them gives his massive theft a pass. Our names would be an issue if our work couldn’t be checked. But everything we’ve posted is publically available information that can be verified independently by anyone with an Internet connection. There were no inside sources, disgruntled employees, or discarded scripts recovered from garbage cans.

The Esquire piece comes after a series of four posts by the duo highlighting similarities between Zakaria’s work and sources he did not credit. The pair also says they have “more examples of Zakaria’s plagiarism.”

RELATED: Is it original? An editor’s guide to identifying plagiarism Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 2.02.28 PM

Is it original? An editor’s guide to identifying plagiarism

If you’re reading this, it happened again. Right now, an editor may be about to issue an apology or a stern rebuttal. Someone’s reputation and body of work is being scrutinized. And a gaggle of self-appointed fact-checkers may be plugging sentence after sentence into Google for any traces of dishonesty. If you’re reading this, a journalist has been accused of what Poynter’s Roy Peter Clark calls “the unoriginal sin”: plagiarism.

Plagiarism is a serious charge. If true, it has the potential to upend a career and mar a journalist’s reputation for life. And yet, in today’s world of aggregated news, plagiarism is an imprecise word that stands for a spectrum of offenses related to unoriginal work. And its severity varies dramatically depending on a variety of circumstances.

So before you jump on Twitter to excoriate or defend the media’s latest alleged idea thief, take a minute to go over the following checklist to determine for yourself whether the charges are true. Also, you can cut out or take a screen shot of our plagiarism flowchart for editors.

  1. Is some of the language in the article unoriginal? Is the central idea of the story unoriginal?
    In his 2007 dissertation on plagiarism in newspapers, Norman Lewis put forth the following definition of plagiarism: “Using someone else’s words or original ideas without attribution.” This definition, he says, focuses on the act of plagiarism itself and disregards questions of intent. Whether or not the journalist meant to plagiarize is a question best reserved for determining the severity of the crime, not for establishing whether it happened.
  2. Did the author fail to set off unoriginal language or ideas with quotation marks?
    Attribution is the opposite of plagiarism, Lewis says, and the clearest indicator of attribution is quotation marks, followed by a citation. The National Summit to Fight Plagiarism and Fabrication put it this way: “Principled professionals credit the work of others, treating others as they would like to be treated themselves.”

  3. Does the author fail to attribute the work in some other way, such as a paraphrase with credit?
    Without proper credit, a paraphrase can be used to conceal plagiarism. As Lewis writes, “treating paraphrasing as a plagiarism panacea ignores the fact that a person who cribs from someone else’s work is still cribbing, even if he or she is adept at rewording.”

  4. Did the author lift more than seven words verbatim from another source?
    For editors and readers trying to evaluate cases of plagiarism, the 7 to 10-word threshold is a useful guideline, said Kelly McBride, Poynter’s vice president of academic programs. The basic idea is that it’s hard to incidentally replicate seven consecutive words that appear in another author’s work. This is not an absolute rule, however — both McBride and Lewis acknowledge that there’s no easy equation to determine what constitutes plagiarism.

If you answered ‘yes’ to all the questions above, then the accusations being hurled around on Twitter are at least partially right; there’s a legitimate case of unoriginal work masquerading as fresh content. But before you call it plagiarism, remember that there might be a more nuanced word for what’s being discussed. Plagiarism.org lists 10 types of thievery, each with their own degrees of severity, and iThenticate, a plagiarism detection service, lists five additional kinds of lifting in its summary on plagiarism in research.

Here’s a sampling of some unoriginal writing you might run into:

  • Self-plagiarism:
    The outing of Jonah Lehrer, one of the most prominent self-plagiarizers in recent memory, touched off a vigorous debate about whether writers who recycle their own work without acknowledging its unoriginality are guilty of plagiarism or some lesser charge. Poynter vice president and senior scholar Roy Peter Clark, along with New York Times standards editor Phil Corbett says “self-plagiarism” should be called something else; writing before the Lehrer incident, Lewis said self-plagiarism was “less an ethical infraction than a potential violation of ownership rights.” McBride likened Lehrer’s duplicitous duplications to a boyfriend who “recycles the same seemingly spontaneous romantic moments on a succession of dates.” Reuters media critic Jack Shafer argues that you can’t steal from yourself.

  • Patchwriting:
    If the author didn’t copy verbatim, he or she may be guilty of intellectual dishonesty — even if they credit the source. Journalists who craft paraphrases that mirror their source material with the exception of a few jumbled-up words are perpetrators of “patchwriting,” which McBride defines as “relying too heavily on the vocabulary and syntax of the source material.” Clark argues that this is a lesser charge than plagiarism if a writer credits their source. McBride has called it “just as dishonest” as plagiarism.

  • Excessive aggregation:
    Rewriting an entire article, even with proper credit (or an obligatory h/t), is a form of appropriation. Plagiarism.org lists aggregation without original ideas as one of the least severe forms of plagiarism because it does not deceive readers about the source of the information. A sure way to avoid excessive aggregation is to transform the original work by adding value to it, McBride said.

  • Idea theft:
    Relying too heavily on another journalist’s original story ideas and concepts is “quite common in journalism and not intellectually honest,” McBride said. This can occur when a reporter sets out to “match” a story by interviewing the same sources without acknowledging the news was first reported elsewhere.

Still unsure whether something was plagiarized? We made a flowchart to help you decide. Click on the image below for a PDF you can cut out and keep nearby for the next time you come across suspicious copy.
PlagiarismFlowchart-01 Read more

Tools:
5 Comments

Zakaria accused of lifting material from New Yorker and AP for TV scripts

Our Bad Media

Fareed Zakaria ripped material from The New Yorker, The Economist, the Associated Press and other outlets for his CNN show “GPS,” the sphynxlike media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort write in their latest set of accusations against Zakaria.

One of their strongest examples includes narration from a documentary called “Justice for Sergei” that inspires similar narration from Zakaria.

They also show instances when “GPS” scripts lifted sentences without attribution, such as a 2012 segment that draws from a New Yorker article by Adam Gopnik and a segment and an Al Jazeera article (click to view the image bigger).

ourbadmedia-gopnik

Some of the items in this latest docket require the reader to take an expansive view of plagiarism: Sentences that appear to summarize the reporting of others without credit, for example.

But they do point to one instance when Zakaria referred to events of “last year,” as did an article they say was his source. But that article was published in 2011, and Zakaria’s program was in 2012.

“Some might take issue with our ‘anonymity,’” they write. Indeed, Steve Buttry wrote recently that “I think it is only anonymity that harms [@blippoblappo and @crushingbort's] credibility. Their substance appears unassailable.”

They write that “Reporters rely heavily on ‘tips’ forwarded to their inbox from advocacy groups, press flacks, government officials, and other organizations whose contributions are never disclosed to readers, to say nothing of their interests.” (Indeed, @blippoblappo has alerted me twice to their plans for new posts, and has never replied to my requests for an interview. They did consent to an interview with TPM’s Tom Kludt after they got Benny Johnson fired with a similar examination of his work.)

I’ve asked CNN for comment and will, of course, update when I hear back.

Previously: Fareed Zakaria gets even more plagiarism accusations Read more

Tools:
1 Comment
zakaria

Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say: Mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort tell Poynter they will have another post on Our Bad Media later this morning outlining what they say are examples of Fareed Zakaria lifting text, this time for his CNN show, “GPS.” Here’s a video that will accompany the piece.

    @blippoblappo and @crushingbort’s last post, in August, outlined suspect passages in Zakaria’s 2008 book, “The Post-American World” and in stories in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs. Neither W.W. Norton, which published the book, Newsweek, Foreign Affairs nor Atlantic Media, where Zakaria is now a contributing editor, replied to Poynter’s requests for comment.

  2. Foley family describes frustrations with U.S. government: The FBI first told James Foley‘s family they’d be prosecuted if they paid ransom to his captors, then advised them prosecution would be unlikely, Rukmini Callimachi reports. “Once the family made it clear they wanted to pay, the bureau instructed them to stall, according to a consultant working on the hostage crisis.” (NYT) | “A policy against paying ransoms makes sense — but making the family of a captured journalist feel like criminals does not.” (Vox) | “It was very upsetting because we were essentially told to trust… that the way they were handling things would bring our son home,” Foley’s mother, Diane Foley, said last week. (ABC News) | The family’s new fund “will push for the discussion, development and coordination of policies that are consistent, transparent, and accountable to all American citizens held captive world-wide.” (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  3. RCFP hires a litigation director: Katie Townsend will help the organization sue those who impede newsgathering. (CJR) | “The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) filed an application on Friday with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg challenging current UK legislation on mass surveillance and its threat to journalism.” (Index on Censorship)
  4. Free cops for Fox News honcho: “According to police records obtained by Gawker, the Cresskill [New Jersey] Police Department supplies 24/7 security to [Roger] Ailes’ residence there—apparently at no cost to Ailes himself—and otherwise delivers on-demand police services to his family, regardless of whether or not they are in any obvious danger.” (Gawker)
  5. Julian Assange did a chat on Gawker: “Opinion polling from the US just two months ago shows that WikiLeaks has majority support of people under the age of 40,” Assange told PootMcFruitcakes in the chat. (Gawker) | “Pale nerd king,” “seed-spilling sex creep,” “Real-life The Matrix extra”: Abby Ohlheiser on Gawker’s history of describing Assange. (WP)
  6. What newspapers can do: They have to offer “engaging and worthwhile material,” Rem Rieder writes, conveying API chief’s Tom Rosenstiel‘s speech at the ASNE convention Monday. “They certainly are not going to out BuzzFeed BuzzFeed at the clickbait game.” (USA Today) | Alexander Nazaryan: Journalism might not be saved, but “it isn’t quite as doomed as we thought several years ago.” (Newsweek)
  7. Let’s talk about native ads: California Sunday Magazine, which plans a launch next month, will feature “story advertising” — “We are doing one series of story advertising with Nest that feels like a gallery exhibit with prominent illustrators and artists and what home means to them,” Chas Edwards tells Kara Swisher. “But we are also making sure we are very transparent.” (Re/code) | Josh Benton: “Why is native advertising so appealing to publishers? Let’s start with the obvious: money. You may have heard that a lot of news companies are in need of it.” (Nieman) | The New York Times Monday published the second of four planned native ads on Mashable. The first was called “11 Inspiring Videos That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity.” (Poynter)
  8. No comment from the bespokesperson?: The New York Times used the word bespoke “more than any other US publication in the past three months, according to a Nexis search, with “bespoke” appearing nearly three dozen times, excluding in proper names.” (CJR)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The Buenos Aires Herald fronts a photo of a man who signals his support of Scottish independence with a complicated hairstyle. (Courtesy the Newseum)

    bah-09162014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ryan Nobles is now a national correspondent for CNN. Previously, he was an anchor and reporter for WWBT in Richmond, Virginia. (CNN) | Preetma Singh has been named market director for Nylon. Formerly, she was market editor at WSJ Magazine. She’s also the drummer for Vomitface. (Email) | Danielle Jones has been named executive vice president for expansion at Politico. Previously, she was deputy editor-in-chief there. Miki King has been named executive vice president for operations at Politico. Previously, she was senior vice president of business development there. (Politico) | Carol Morello will be a diplomatic correspondent at The Washington Post. She covers the census and demographics there. (The Washington Post) | Theodore Kim is now a homepage editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was a mobile and tablet editor at The Washington Post. (Sched) | Marin Cogan will be a contributing editor at New York Magazine. She’s a writer-at-large for the National Journal. (Politico) | Tim Evans will be a consumer advocate for The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a court reporter there. (@starwatchtim) | Les Zaitz has been named investigations editor at The Oregonian. He is a senior investigative reporter there. (Email) | Job of the day: The San Jose Mercury News is looking for a Silicon Valley reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Fareed Zakaria gets even more plagiarism accusations

Our Bad Media

Enigmatic media critics @crushingbort and @blippoblappo say they’ve found more examples of Fareed Zakaria lifting material from other texts. The purportedly purloined passages, they say, appear in Zakaria’s 2008 book “The Post-American World” and in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs cover stories.

“On more than a number of occasions, Zakaria has taken entire paragraphs from the authors and shifted them around in an apparent attempt to avoid detection,” they write.

Here’s one of their examples, of stuff they say Zakaria stole from Fawaz Gerges (click to view bigger):

Gerges-Al-Qaeda

Zakaria responded to @crushingbort and @blippoblappo’s first post about his work, saying their previous examples “are all facts, not someone else’s writing or opinions or expressions.” Washington Post Editorial Editor Fred Hiatt told Poynter the allegations were “reckless.” Time, for which Zakaria last wrote a column in March, told Poynter it planned to re-review Zakaria’s work. (He joined Atlantic Media as a contributing editor last month.)

“W.W. Norton, the publisher of Zakaria’s book, Newsweek, and Foreign Affairs owe it to everyone who ever picked up a copy of his work to review and address these issues,” the bloggers write. Poynter is working on getting comment from these organizations.

Previously: Zakaria: “I was not trying to pass the work off as my own.” (CNN) | Former Newsweek editor says his writing appeared under Zakaria’s byline (Poynter) | Time, CNN reinstate Fareed Zakaria after plagiarism investigations (Poynter)

Correction: This post originally misspelled Gerges’ first name. Read more

Tools:
8 Comments
foley 2

The last email sent to Foley’s family

mediawiremorningGood morning. Your weekend is in sight. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. James Foley’s last months: Cassandra Vinograd tells how James Foley‘s family communicated with his captors. (NBC News) | “Some messages were political and some were financial.” (CNN) | The last email sent to his family (GlobalPost) | Shane Bauer: “Like my family, [Foley's family] probably sometimes thought they should do more to try and convince his captors to let him go. Other times they likely reasoned they should stay quiet, hoping that silence would give the hostage takers the opportunity to quietly release him. It’s a hideous position to be in.” (Mother Jones) | NYT editorial: “There is no simple answer on whether to submit to terrorist extortion.” (NYT) || Foley’s family establishes journalism scholarship at Marquette. (The Wire)
  2. More Fareed Zakaria plagiarism accusations coming: @crushingbort and @blippoblappo have another post coming, they tell Poynter. (It will post here.) Here’s a taste (bigger image here) of what they say is coming:

    Gerges-Al-Qaeda
     

  3. Ferguson has become a routine: “But now the nights follow a ragged, rule-bound routine that begins before dusk, when reporters check batteries, officers check weapons, and protesters prepare to repeat their calls for accountability.” (NYT) | “Down the hill on West Florissant, people gather throughout the night — journalists, police, protesters, people who seem to just want to watch all three.” (Poynter) | “Part of the reason Twitter has been so intertwined with the news coming out of Ferguson are the social media habits of blacks and journalists.” (Politico) | Al Jazeera America freelancer Ryan L. Schuessler finds the “behavior and number of journalists [in Ferguson] so appalling, that I cannot in good conscience continue to be a part of the spectacle.” (Ryan L. Schuessler) | “Schuessler won’t name” the journalists he claims to have seen behaving badly, J.K. Trotter writes. “But we will.” (Gawker)
  4. So why can’t HuffPost pay to keep a citizen journalist in Ferguson?? Plan to crowd-source funding for Mariah Stewart to keep reporting through Beacon drew boos from journalists who wondered why HuffPost couldn’t just pay her. (Jim Romenesko) | “Readers, won’t you make a donation today to support HuffPo’s nip-slip coverage?” (AdAge) | Mathew Ingram: “the choice isn’t between HuffPo hiring Stewart and using Beacon Reader to crowdfund a salary, it’s between crowdfunding her fellowship and not doing anything.” (Gigaom)
  5. Ferguson potpourri: The best and worst data journalism that’s come out of the coverage. (CJR) | An explainer on protest leaders (Riverfront Times) | Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan hits a story on Michael Brown‘s death: “The Times is asking readers to trust its sourcing, without nearly enough specificity or detail; and it sets up an apparently equal dichotomy between named eyewitnesses on one hand and ghosts on the other.” (NYT) | HuffPost’s Ferguson omnibus. (HuffPost) | Some of Kristen Hare‘s photos. (Poynter)
  6. Don Lemon is not having a good Ferguson: Interview with Talib Kweli goes very wrong. (Mediaite) | Discussion of weapons goes very wrong. (Gawker) | Related: “What journalists need to know about guns and gun control” (Poynter)
  7. How to sell Tumblr: The number of accounts should grow 25 percent this year. “Because many Tumblr users have multiple blogs, the number of blogs (currently 200 million) and daily posts (84.2 million) grows at a multiple to the number of users, giving the company a lot of new, mobile ad inventory — if only Yahoo can figure out a way to sell it.” (Forbes)
  8. A historic moment: Media reporter goes on vacation, and someone notices. (FishbowlDC)
  9. Oxford American plans Kickstarter campaign to fund music issue: Party Sept. 2 at South on Main in Little Rock. (Arkansas Times)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Edward Menicheschi is now president of Condé Nast Media Group. He was publisher of Vanity Fair. (Poynter) | Kim Heneghan is now vice president and general manager of money products for U.S. News and World Report. Previously, she was general manager of online at Hanley Wood, a real estate media firm. Kim Castro was named executive editor of consumer advice at U.S. News. Previously, she was managing editor for money and health there. (U.S. News) | Dan Mellon will be general manager of WJLA in Washington D.C. Previously, he was a group manager for Sinclair’s stations. Tony D’Angelo will be general manager of WSYX in Columbus, Ohio. (Sinclair Broadcast Group) | J.C. Lowe will be general manager of WEAR and WFGX in Pensacola, Florida. Previously, he was Sinclair’s general manager in Birmingham. (Sinclair Broadcast Group) | Deep Nishar, senior vice president of products and user experience at LinkedIn, is leaving the company. (LinkedIn) | Jessi Hempel is a senior writer at Wired. Previously, she was a writer for Fortune. (Jessi Hempel) | Job of the day: The National Journal is looking for an editor for its Next America project. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs). Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

A programming note: I will be on vacation Aug. 25-29. If you get this roundup by email, it will come to you from Sam Kirkland while I’m gone. Please email Sam (skirkland@poynter.org), Kristen Hare (khare@poynter.org) or Ben Mullin (bmullin@poynter.org) with tips and job moves while I’m gone. See you Sept. 2.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments