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Freelancing

NEWS

3 ex-newspaper columnists team up to launch college football site

Chris Dufresne hopes this comparison to Starbucks carries over to his new college football website. “You see people standing in line in Starbucks every day ready to pay $5 for whatever coffee they want,” Dufresne said. “Why do they do it? The only reason is because they are addicted to caffeine. Well, in a weird sort of way, I … Read More
NEWS

Thinking about making the jump to freelance? Here's what you need to know

Claire Carusillo left her full-time social media job last year to jump-start her writing career. Since college, she wanted to become a staff writer at a website or magazine. But she noticed that the people producing creative work she liked were largely freelancers — very few had staff jobs. Like many journalists, she started with social media to get … Read More
NEWS

One reporter's journey to Cuba and how to get the story

Flag and fins - Harrison reporting from Cuba. (Photo by Carlos Harrison)The announcement came as a total surprise. The United States and Cuba would normalize diplomatic relations, ending their half-century-old Cold War stalemate. It was a big story. Even bigger in South Florida. They don’t call it Little Havana for nothing. As a Miami-based freelancer I knew that all … Read More
NEWS

Patrick Stevens is the hardest-working college basketball writer no one will hire

The Washington Post | USA Today | D1scourse.com Patrick Stevens got all 68 teams in the NCAA tournament correct while working part-time for USA Today and is the reporter University of Maryland Coach Mark Turgeon turns to for the first question at every press conference. He writes about sports on his own site, D1scourse.com. But he can't translate all that to a full-time gig, Dan Steinberg writes: Stevens was laid off twice by the Washington Times, once in 2009, again in 2012. Since then, his work has been largely self-generated, Steinberg writes: Although he was consumed by bubble watches and bracket modifications last week, he still went to the ACC Tournament in Greensboro, believing the visibility couldn’t hurt. Read More
NEWS

Reporters say they're 'now being required to do entirely too much work for free'

The Atlantic | Esquire | Emily Hauser | Forbes | Salon The recent dustup between Nate Thayer and The Atlantic concerning payment (or lack thereof) for freelance writers has highlighted a fact obvious to many working in newsrooms across all platforms: Writers, as a profession, don't make very much, especially considering the volume of work they perform on any given project. Charles Pierce said as much in a post for Esquire last week, chastising the Washington Post's Ezra Klein for writing that much of the quality copy for news organizations is already being written for free by professionals who aren't journalists, but rather "academics and business consultants and market analysts and former politicians." These sources, Klein argues, "have the expertise that makes editors -- and readers -- trust them." This is a defensible position, Klein argues, because most journalists are simply repackaging their sources' point of view, and the sources aren't paid for their contributions. Read More
NEWS

Atlantic is 'sorry' to have offended freelancer with request for free content

Nate Thayer | James Bennet Editor-in-Chief James Bennet would like you to know this recent dustup -- over asking a freelancer to provide free Web content -- isn't how The Atlantic normally operates. Freelance writer Nate Thayer posted to his blog Monday an email exchange between himself and an Atlantic editor, who wanted to see if Thayer would "repurpose" a recent article into a shorter version for the Atlantic website. For free. Atlantic editor Olga Khazan wrote, in part: "We unfortunately can’t pay you for it, but we do reach 13 million readers a month. ... I am out of freelance money right now, I enjoyed your post, and I thought you’d be willing to summarize it for posting for a wider audience without doing any additional legwork. Some journalists use our platform as a way to gain more exposure." Thayer stridently refused: "I have bills to pay and cannot expect to do so by giving my work away for free to a for profit company so they can make money off of my efforts. ... Frankly, I will refrain from being insulted and am perplexed how one can expect to try to retain quality professional services without compensating for them." Read More
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