Articles about "Gawker"


Epic concept.

Gawker bans ‘Internet slang’

“We want to sound like regular adult human beings, not Buzzfeed writers or Reddit commenters,” new Gawker Editor Max Read says in a memo to the publication’s writers. Words like “epic,” “pwn” and “derp” are no longer welcome on the site. Read also says the word “massive” is “never to appear on the website Gawker dot com.”

He also asks staffers not to use strikethrough for corrections, preferring they “change the wording and link from there to a comment noting the corrected text.” He singles out a correction by J.K. Trotter that was done in “the proper spirit and is funny to boot.”

Full memo:… Read more

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Highlights from Nick Denton’s online company meeting

Gawker Media honcho Nick Denton held a company meeting Tuesday on Kinja, Gawker’s commenting and publishing platform. He wrote: “As its makers, we should use the software ourselves: its virtues should be evident in internal as well as external communication.”

Some pretty good stuff from the meeting:

“You seem incapable of keeping editors for any length of time,” one person — perhaps not an employee since s/he is using the name of Tony Curtis’ character in “Sweet Smell of Success”states, following it with a question: “Is that intentional or regrettable?” (First Look Media announced yesterday that Gawker Editor John Cook is leaving to become editor-in-chief of The Intercept; Max Read will take over Gawker.)

Former editor A.J. Daulerio is “one of the best and most loyal colleagues,” Denton replied, saying few people thought Cook could match Daulerio’s traffic, “and yet Gawker.com now has 20 times the audience (see chart) it had during the supposed golden age of 2007,” Denton wrote.… Read more

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FOIA lessons from Gawker Editor John Cook

Last January, Ann Coulter expressed her anger about The (Westchester County, N.Y.) Journal-News’ gun-permit map, which it assembled from public records. “I want them for Manhattan!” Coulter told Sean Hannity. “I want to know how many rich liberals with their bodyguards have gun permits.”

John Cook, then the investigations editor for Gawker, was able to oblige quickly when that news hook fell from the sky. “I’d had those records in a filing cabinet for a year or more,” he said in a phone call. Cook posted a list of names of New York City gun-permit holders he’d received from the New York Police Department in August 2010. The filing didn’t include addresses, though Cook noted those were already online.

So now if you want to see a picture of John Cook’s house, it, too, is online, thanks to an irate blogger.… Read more

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Mistake means New York Times series debuts early in Las Vegas Sun

Las Vegas Sun | Politico | Gawker |The New York Times

A star-crossed New York Times story is back on the Las Vegas Sun’s website Monday morning. The Sun published the story early, then said it pulled it. You can see it now with a timestamp of 3:22 p.m. on Sunday, and many notes to editors at New York Times News Service clients:

New York Times editor Carolyn Ryan may have inadvertently caused people to notice the goof by praising an imminent new series.

 

Then Ryan said she was headed home to watch “Homeland.” Less than an hour and a half later, BuzzFeed reporter Andrew Kaczynski found a summary of the series on the Las Vegas Sun’s site.… Read more

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Joel Johnson named Gawker Media’s editorial director

Joel Johnson, who founded Consumerist and has edited Gawker Media properties Gizmodo and Kotaku, will be Gawker Media’s editorial director. Gawker Media honcho Nick Denton told staffers the news in the office Wednesday. Denton sent a quick memo:

A quick bulletin for those out of the office. Joel Johnson — former editor of Gizmodo and Kotaku — is coming back to the editorial department. He’ll be the editorial director, the position that has been unfilled since Lockhart Steele and Noah Robischon. Joel starts in the new year. More details to come!

Tweeted Gawker Editor John Cook:

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Readers will ‘eventually choose the juicy truth over a heartwarming hoax,’ says Nick Denton

In an email to staffers Tuesday, Gawker Media honcho Nick Denton said it was “bad news” that BuzzFeed beat Gawker in traffic in November. Upworthy, which he describes as “even smarmier than Buzzfeed,” is “nipping at our heels,” Denton writes.

But Gawker sites had 106 million unique visitors last month, he writes, and its Kinja platform will likely even the race. While Gawker is “not completely averse to crowd-pleasing,” Denton writes, Deadspin’s Manti Teo story shows “the crowd will eventually choose the juicy truth over a heartwarming hoax.”

Full memo: … Read more

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A viral stamp (Depositphotos)

Is viral content the next bubble?

The Wire | PandoDaily | The Wall Street Journal

The website Viral Nova emulates sites like BuzzFeed and Upworthy, and was in October “already nearly half the size of the sites that inspired it,” Alex Litel writes. Its success suggests specializing in viral content “can be reverse engineered fairly quickly by anyone with a careful eye for emulation — which is to say everyone on the Internet.”

Viral Nova publishes articles with headlines like “This Puppy Taught Me More In 1 Minute Than Anyone Else Has Done In A Lifetime” and “Yes, This Is A Boy Chained Up Like A Dog. And The Reason Why Is Even More Heartbreaking.”… Read more

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Gawker’s Scocca, Toronto Star’s Cruickshank talk on air

On the Media | Gawker

Gawker features editor Tom Scocca and Toronto Star Publisher John Cruickshank appeared on WNYC’s
“On The Media” to talk about the Rob Ford story and a heated e-mail back and forth between the two, which Gawker published Nov. 4.

“In retrospect, we shouldn’t have put ‘Star Exclusive’ [on the Star's report about the video, which followed Gawker's] and I apologize for that,” Cruickshank said on air, adding that Gawker breaking the Rob Ford story was “incredibly helpful.”

Cruickshank later wrote a column extolling what Scocca called “the Star’s lone heroism,” which also rankled its competitors to the south. The only development in the Ford story between Gawker’s May 16 story and the Star’s the next day was that Gawker decided to publish, Scocca said.… Read more

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Rob Ford

How the Toronto Star is telling the Rob Ford story

Just before 10:30 on Thursday morning, staff at the Toronto Star gathered around a large screen in the center of the newsroom and watched the story they’d told since May get told again. This time, though, it was Toronto Chief of Police Bill Blair doing the telling.

Police had recovered video files of Toronto Mayor Rob Ford smoking a crack pipe.

“The video files depict images that are consistent with what has previously been reported,” Blair said.

Kevin Donovan, the head of the Star’s investigative team, and reporter Robyn Doolittle saw the cell phone video themselves back in May. They and many others at the Star have reported about it since, chiseling away around the edges of something they’d seen but didn’t physically have.

Ford repeatedly said there was no video.… Read more

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In an interview with Toronto’s Globe and Mail, Gawker Editor John Cook talked about the purported Rob Ford crack tape, which his publication tried to purchase via crowdfunding. Unable to buy the tape, the site split the money between four Canadian charities. “What do you think of media ethics?” Simon Houpt asked Cook.

I think of media ethics the same way I think of plumber ethics: I think that, as a human being, I’m bound by certain ethical precepts I try to live my life by, but I do not think as a profession that reporters and editors need to think of themselves as bound by an additional, secondary set of ethical restrictions – the way that, say, lawyers or doctors think of themselves as bound by an additional set of conditions. I think it’s more instructive to think of reporters the way people think of tradesman and women. I think it’s a trade rather than a profession – it’s certainly starting to pay more like a trade than a profession. And I think the idea of building up a superstructure of journalism ethics is part of a process of trying to exclude the hoi polloi from the process of reporting and commenting on the news.

Simon Houpt, The Globe and Mail

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