Gawker

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.15.16 PM

Here’s how news homepages showed the no indictment ruling in Eric Garner’s death

News broke on Wednesday afternoon that a grand jury in New York would not indict police officer Daniel Pantaleo in the death of Eric Garner. Here are screenshots of how the news appeared on the homepages of several news organizations, with links to their coverage:

The New York Post:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.19.23 PM

CNN:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 2.52.53 PM

Vox:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 2.55.24 PM

The New York Times:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 2.57.35 PM

BuzzFeed News:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 2.59.21 PM

Gawker:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.00.22 PM

Epoch Times:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.01.23 PM

The Guardian:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.05.05 PM

Yahoo News:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.12.14 PM

Al Jazeera America:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.15.16 PM

Fox News:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.29.21 PM

Huffington Post:

Screen Shot 2014-12-03 at 3.31.50 PM

My colleague Ben Mullin has also started a Twitter list with journalists reporting on the ruling. Please let him know who he’s missing through email or Twitter.


!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

News orgs want to help fix Ferguson

Good morning. Here are eight media stories. (No newsletter tomorrow or Friday — happy Thanksgiving, and see you Monday.)

  1. News orgs seek your ideas on Ferguson

    #FergusonNext is a project from the opinion shops at The Guardian, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Ebony.com, Colorlines, The St. Louis American and Riverfront Times. (#FergusonNext) | Darren Wilson spoke with George Stephanopoulos. (ABC News) | Freelance reporters Emily Molli and Marcus DiPaola got robbed in Ferguson. (Riverfront Times) | Post-Dispatch employees covering Ferguson: Sorry, no Thanksgiving break for you. (Poynter) | Post-Dispatch front: "Smoldering"

  2. Why do people react so strongly to CNN?

    Ferguson protesters in New York last night chanted "Fuck CNN." The network showed the chants. "Hats off to CNN for showing as much of the chanting as they did," Erik Wemple writes. "But they may want to consider why it is that people seem to react so strongly to this news provider." (WP) | Maybe it's Don Lemon? A catalog of his weirdest moments. (WP)

  3. First Look kills its business publication, cans staff

    The Pierre Omidyar-backed media group dispatches Racket, the publication Matt Taibbi was supposed to edit, and its staff, with a five-sentence post. (First Look Media) | Employees of FLM talked anonymously to Chris Lehmann. Among the complaints: Everyone's salaries got posted by mistake to the company intranet, and "For all their talk about ‘iterating,’ ‘blue sky,’ and the rest," managers are "not interested in any of the difficult stuff of leadership." (In These Times) | Racket staffers who need jobs. (@pareene)

  4. Jian Ghomeshi withdraws CBC lawsuit

    Disgraced radio host will not pursue damages from his former employer, will pay CBC's legal costs. (The Globe and Mail)

  5. How to explain to your family that you work at Gawker

    J.K. Trotter: "It’s this news website thing in New York ... Um, I write about media ... It’s called Gawker. ... Yes. With a ‘G.’" (Gawker)

  6. The lines are crossing at MailOnline

    Digital ad-revenue gains at the Internet juggernaut in 2014 had the effect of "almost completely offsetting the advertising and sales decline at the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday." (The Guardian)

  7. But nothing about #grapegate?

    NYT says its Thanksgiving dishes feature had "numerous errors." (Poynter)

  8. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    The Virginian-Pilot shows Darren Wilson's red cheek. (Courtesy the Newseum)
    vapilot-11262014
     

Ben Mullin's job moves is off till Monday. Load up his inbox in the meantime: bmullin@poynter.org. Corrections? Tips? Arguments about apple pies vs. pumpkin? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Business Insider’s Aaron Gell named editorial director at Maxim

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • John Cook will run investigations at Gawker Media. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of The Intercept. (Poynter)
  • Aaron Gell will be editorial director of Maxim. Previously, he was features editor at Business Insider. (Capital)
  • Maeve Reston will be a reporter with CNN Politics Digital. She is a political reporter with The Los Angeles Times. (Fishbowl DC)
  • Bob Sipchen will be senior editor for the California section at The Los Angeles Times. Previously, he was editor-in-chief of Sierra Magazine. (Email)
  • Cynthia Needham will be deputy business editor at The Boston Globe. She is political editor there. Jon Chesto will be a reporter at The Boston Globe. Previously, he was managing editor of the Boston Business Journal. Sacha Pfeiffer will return to The Boston Globe to cover wealth management and power. She is the host of WBUR’s All Things Considered. (Dan Kennedy)
  • Alexis Ohanian will be executive chairman at Reddit. He is a partner at Y Combinator.
  • Abby Livingston will be D.C. bureau chief for The Texas Tribune. Previously, she was a reporter for Roll Call. (Fishbowl DC)
  • Alex Leo will be head of audience development for Yahoo. Previously, she was head of product for IBT Media. (Capital)

Job of the day The San Francisco Chronicle is looking for an Oakland reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

John Cook leaves The Intercept

Intercept Editor-in-Chief John Cook is leaving the publication and returning to Gawker Media to run investigations, an individual with knowledge of the hire tells Poynter. Cook was previously editor of Gawker. He announced he’d leave that publication for the First Look Media-owned property in March.

Update: Gawker Media confirms the hire and talks about what it means in terms of its plans for a more unified editorial approach.

Vanity Fair’s Sarah Ellison first reported Cook’s departure and new job.

Cook was one of the authors of an Intercept piece that examined why Matt Taibbi left First Look Media. The story laid the blame for his departure on a disconnect between “First Look executives, who by and large come from a highly structured Silicon Valley corporate environment, and the fiercely independent journalists who view corporate cultures and management-speak with disdain.” The Intercept, the story said, “was able to resolve most of these conflicts.” Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
Screen Shot 2014-11-04 at 10.21.36 AM

5 voter guides, from BuzzFeed to Vice

If you’re waiting until lunch or after work to go and vote today, here are five sites that break down the issues in Tuesday’s midterm election. From BuzzFeed News to Gawker to Mashable to Vice to Vox, each offers up guides on specific races and issues, told in their own style. Many also have liveblogs ready to update with results.

Also, from Friday, my colleague Andrew Beaujon wrote “How news orgs plan digital coverage of midterms,” with coverage plans from some of the big media organizations. If your news org is telling the story of today’s election in a new or interesting way, please let us know. You can write something in the comments, email me or tweet me at @kristenhare.

Let’s start with BuzzFeed News, which looked at marijuana with “Legally High: Marijuana Initiatives On The Ballot In Three States And D.C.” on Friday, Oct. 31. From Michelle Broder Van Dyke:

Legislatures have been slow to support marijuana, so advocates have taken action by pushing for voter decided ballot measures. On Nov. 4, Residents in Alaska, Oregon, and Washington, D.C., will decide whether to legalize marijuana. In Florida and Guam, a U.S. territory, voters will decide on a medical marijuana program, and a few cities have added decriminalization bills to the ballot.

Here’s BuzzFeed News’ liveblog.

Gawker took a bigger stab at the election with “The Gawker Voter’s Exhaustive Guide to the 2014 Midterm Elections” by Adam Weinstein.

Voting sucks. Off-year voting sucks the worst. Like Valentine’s, Election Day 2014 seems less a heartfelt chance to express preferences than a mandate to give one’s limited purchasing options a whiff of will and legitimacy. You can be forgiven for inattention. But you still must make some choices. Here’s some info to help.

From Mashable, “Guns, weed and abortion: The issues up for a vote in 2014,” by Colin Daileda.

There’s a handy map, too.

Mashable also has a cool roundup of some crazy ads we’ve seen this season.

From Vice, “The VICE Guide to the Midterms,” by Grace Wyler.

The 2014 midterm elections are next week, and if you are like virtually everyone else in America, you give zero fucks.

I mean, say it out loud: “midterms.” Even its name is an affront to American exceptionalism. But if you think that its inherent lameness excuses you from caring, you’re wrong. On November 4, a small group of voters–mostly old, white ones–will determine the future of the country for the next two years. And you’re going to have to live with their choices. Keep going down this road and sooner or later you’re going to wake up and realize that Charlotte Clinton Santorum is president, your kids don’t believe in evolution, and the street signs are in Chinese. And you’ll only have yourself to blame.

And from Vox, “9 damn good reasons to go vote today,” by Ezra Klein.

This election, like every election, matters. It matters for reasons we know, and it matters for reasons we don’t yet know. But I’m not sure we in the media have done a great job explaining why it matters. We’ve said a lot about who might win, and we’ve said a lot about campaign strategies, and we’ve said a lot about how this election seems to be boring everyone. But I’m not sure we’ve made the stakes as clear as they could be. So here they are.

Here’s Vox’s liveblog.


!function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

8 women accuse Ghomeshi of assault, harassment

Good morning. Here are nine media stories.

  1. Women say Jian Ghomeshi choked, assaulted, harassed them

    The former CBC host's accusers "describe a man obsessed with his image and power, and someone who they say has little or no respect for barriers," Kevin Donovan and Jesse Brown write. Most of the women stayed anonymous but "Trailer Park Boys" actor Lucy DeCoutere put her name to her charges. Ghomeshi's alleged behavior was not confined to his private life, the report says: One woman said he told her “I want to hate f--- you” in a meeting and later "cupped her buttocks." When she complained, a producer asked her “what (she) could do to make this a less toxic work environment?” Ghomeshi, who is suing the CBC following his dismissal, did not comment. (Toronto Star) | Dan Savage: "Ghomeshi isn't a safe, sane, and consensual kinkster. He's a reckless, abusive, and dangerous one who has traumatized some women and lucked out with others." (The Stranger) | Melissa Martin: The "'pattern of behaviour' Ghomeshi accused his accusers of trying to create, it existed long before their allegations did." (Nothing in Winnipeg)

  2. Tim Cook writes about being gay

    "I don’t consider myself an activist, but I realize how much I’ve benefited from the sacrifice of others. So if hearing that the CEO of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, or bring comfort to anyone who feels alone, or inspire people to insist on their equality, then it’s worth the trade-off with my own privacy." (Bloomberg Businessweek)

  3. NYT Co. 3Q earnings today

    The company "is seeing favorable earnings estimate revision activity as of late, which is generally a precursor to an earnings beat." (Zacks) | Expect questions about the sudden departure of digital boss Denise Warren at the earnings call, at 11 a.m. (NYTCo)

  4. New pages

    The homepage is The Guardian's “single strongest lever to direct attention," director of digital strategy Wolfgang Blau tells Sam Kirkland. “People go to edited sources because they trust to be told what really is important,” creative director Alex Breuer says. Still, 59 percent of visits to The Guardian last month originated on article pages. (Poynter) | NPR launches its new music site with an Auto-Tune-free T-Pain concert. (NPR)

  5. Why does the U.S. detain so many journalists at borders?

    "It may be the case that journalists' travel patterns and data flows just happen to trigger alerts within federal databases," Geoffrey King writes. "But the experiences of the journalists CPJ interviewed make it clear that CBP's broad discretion is having a negative impact on the free flow of news." (CPJ)

  6. Gawker may cover Albany

    "The last thing I want to do is say, 'We're gonna fuck Albany up and take down Cuomo or whatever!'" Gawker EIC Max Read tells Peter Sterne. "We may send people up there and find that we have nothing to write about and nothing to do." (Capital)

  7. David Plotz explains the basic problem the Internet presents publishers

    "The internet doesn’t work like a print magazine," Slate's former editor tells Christopher Massie. "You don’t pull people into Slate through one thing and then they stay for another." Plotz also talks about his new job at Atlas Obscura: "The chance to do a different kind of journalism which has a sense of mission that is about delight and joy and discovery is appealing." (CJR)

  8. Front pages of the day, curated by Kristen Hare

    Pride in San Francisco. Stoicism in Kansas City. (Courtesy the Newseum)

    sfc-10302014

    kcstar-10302014  

  9. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin

    Elise Hu will be NPR's Asia correspondent in Seoul. She covers tech and culture at NPR. (Poynter) | Mitra Kalita is now executive editor-at-large for Quartz. Previously, she was ideas editor there. Paul Smalera will be Quartz' new ideas editor. He is editor of The New York Times opinion app. (Poynter) | Donald Baer is now chairman of PBS' board of directors. He is CEO of Burson-Marsteller. (PBS) | Jessica Coen is now a contributing editor at Marie Claire. She is an editor-at-large with Jezebel. (Fishbowl NY) | Stephen Lacy is now chairman of the Association of Magazine Media. He is CEO of the Meredith Corporation. (Email) | Dan Katz will be chief of staff to Arianna Huffington. He's currently a chief researcher for David Gergen. Maxwell Strachan is now senior editor of business and tech at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was business editor there. (email) | Emily Yoshida will be entertainment editor at The Verge. Previously, she was culture editor at Grantland. (Muck Rack) | Job of the day: The Virginian-Pilot is looking for a digital news editor. Ger your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Corrections? Tips? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Career Beat: Sam Biddle to leave Valleywag

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Sam Biddle will be a senior writer at Gawker. Previously, he was co-editor of Valleywag. Nitasha Tiku will assume Biddle’s responsibilities at Valleywag. She is co-editor there. (Business Insider)
  • Polina Marinova is now associate editor of audience engagement at Fortune. Previously, she was social media editor at OZY Media. (@polina_marinova)
  • Karen Leigh is now deputy Middle East bureau chief at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was managing editor of Syria Deeply. (@raju)
  • Rachel Orr will be a mobile designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a page designer at Express. (The Washington Post)
  • Stephen Bohner is now a mobile producer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was an online producer for The Arizona Republic (The Washington Post)
  • Kyle Brinkman has been named news director for KLFY in Lafayette, Louisiana. Previously, he was news director for WEAR in Pensacola, Florida. Andrea Clenney will be news director for WLTZ in Columbus, Georgia. Previously, she was news director for WCJB in Gainesville, Florida. Jennifer Rigby is vice president of special projects for the Weather Channel. Previously, she was vice president of live programming there. Leesa Dillon is now senior executive producer at WGCL in Atlanta. Previously, she was senior executive producer at KCTV in Kansas City. (Rick Geevers)

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is looking for an online news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Could Sun-Times reporter’s resignation affect governor’s race?

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Will Sun-Times reporter’s resignation shake Illinois governor’s race? Sun-Times Springfield bureau chief Dave McKinney quit publicly yesterday, saying the paper suspended him after Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner — a former investor in the Sun-Times’ parent company — tried to get a story squashed because he’s married to a Democratic consultant. (Dave McKinney’s blog) | Sun-Times EIC Jim Kirk responds: “I call the shots. While I’ve been here, our ownership and management have never quashed a story and they have always respected the journalistic integrity of this paper.” (Poynter) | To make this story even more gothic, the Sun-Times endorsed Rauner last Friday, breaking a policy it set in early 2012. | “But, at a minimum, the ongoing story certainly will give the [campaign of Rauner's Democratic opponent, Gov. Pat Quinn] an enormous platform to charge that Mr. Rauner is against not just poor people but freedom of the press,” Greg Hinz writes. (Crain’s Chicago Business)
  2. OK, it’s time to pay attention to Gamergate: The online movement, which opposes…something “has declared another victory after software maker Adobe implicitly condemned a recent series of tweets from Gawker writer Sam Biddle that made fun of the Gamergate movement.” (Re/code) | Gawker Editor-in-Chief Max Read writes: “I’ve been told that we’ve lost thousands of dollars already, and could potentially lose thousands more, if not millions.” Read says he feels like “went to sleep in the regular world and woke up in an insane new one where ‘bullying’ is something that it’s possible to be seriously and sincerely ‘for.’” Nevertheless, brands like Intel and Adobe have proven themselves “willing to distance themselves from independent publishers over the spurious claims of a limited but dedicated group of misogynists and trolls.” (Gawker) | “Adobe walks into Gamergate, staggers around confusedly” (Boing Boing)
  3. A little bit more on Ben Bradlee: He struggled with issues of race and sex in the newsroom. (Maynard Institute) | Rachel Jones remembers how Bradlee pushed her to take a Washington Post internship and basically willed her into employment as a journalist. “We have GOT to make an effort to include voices besides our own in this goddamned newspaper,” she remembers him saying. (LinkedIn) | “If there was one happy facet of the [Janet] Cooke affair, it was that the mistake of one young reporter cleared the way for the success of another,” Jon Campbell writes: The Village Voice got its first Pulitzer after the Post returned Cooke’s prize, for Teresa Carpenter‘s story about Dorothy Stratten, “Death of a Playmate.” (The Village Voice) | Bradlee’s tenure at the Post should be viewed in relation to his slimly acknowledged competition with Jim Bellows at the Washington Star. “Bellows might have gotten a bigger send off when he died at the age of 86 in 2009 had Bradlee had preceded him in death,” Jack Shafer writes. “But, no, Bradlee was the last giant standing, and according to the rules of the game, he who dies last gets the biggest funeral pyre. Bellows would understand completely.” (Reuters) | Media myths creep into Bradlee obits. (Media Myth Alert)
  4. Anderson Cooper swats reporter who asked for selfie with him: Vandon Gene requested a photo with the CNN anchor at the site where a Canadian soldier was killed yesterday. (The Blaze) | “I can’t believe any station employs you, and if you want to be a journalist, learn how to behave when covering a story.” (@andersoncooper)
  5. NYT may have lots of takers for buyouts: Guild rep Grant Glickson tells Keith J. Kelly “There were over 300 requests,” by members to look at the company’s severance packages. (NYP) | The company is looking to shed 100 jobs. (Poynter) | “‘Some people who were undecided about leaving, or just curious, didn’t want to request the paperwork because they worried (correctly or not) that it would put targets on their backs,’ Times higher education reporter Richard Pérez-Peña, a Guild vice chair, wrote Thursday in a post on Facebook. ‘To protect those people, some of my colleagues suggested that EVERYONE should ask for it. Suddenly, the number soared, but most of those people have no intention of leaving.’” (Capital)
  6. Why did Politico Magazine let a BP PR exec write a story about pollution in the Gulf? Geoff Morrell‘s story, “No, BP Didn’t Ruin the Gulf,” is “Free native advertising,” Erik Wemple writes. (WP) | “As of Wednesday afternoon, Morrell’s piece is now filed to the ‘Opinion’ section of Politico Magazine. The story was earlier filed to ‘Environment’ and not clearly marked as an Opinion piece.” (Newsweek)
  7. Roman Mars’ advice for indie radio producers: “The most fundamental thing is own your work.” (Capital)
  8. A road trip in North Korea: Eric Talmadge took a monitored trip through the Hermit Kingdom: “At the best hotels in cities such as Hamhung, Samjiyon and Chongjin, the places where we stayed as our journey proceeded through the hinterlands, the rooms, replete with doilies and cushy velvet-covered chairs, were clean, the decor retro Soviet and the food plentiful. But the vintage TVs, when they worked, offered only one channel.” (AP)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: “Attacked,” on the front of the Globe and Mail. (More Canadian front pages here.)

    globeandmail-10232014  

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Rachel Zarrell is now news editor at BuzzFeed News. Previously, she was a weekend editor there. (‏@rachelzarrell) | Ben Calhoun is now director of content and programming at WBEZ in Chicago. Previously, he was a producer for “This American Life.” (Robert Feder) | Ada Guerin is now creative director at The Wrap. Previously, she was design director and associate art director at The Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap) | Jose Zamora is now on the board of directors of the Online News Association. He is director of strategic communications at Univision Network. (ONA) | Carla Zanoni will be global audience development director at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was director of social media and engagement at DNAinfo.com. (Carla Zanoni) | Tara Adiseshan is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post. Previously, she worked on search design at Autodesk and conducted research focused on harvesting rainwater in India. Juan Elosua is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at La Nacion. He is a telecommunications engineer and data journalist. Livia Labate is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at NPR. Previously, she led Marriott’s digital standards and practices group. Linda Sandvik is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The Guardian. Previously, she worked in local government. Julia Smith is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at the Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, she was a designer and developer on news sites and mobile applications. Francis Tseng is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post He currently teaches at the New School’s Design + Journalism program. (dansinker.com) | Jon Garinn is now medical editor of the radiology administration department at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Previously, he was managing editor of CURE Magazine. (email) | Job of the day: Politico is looking for a lobbying reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Spin loses another editor-in-chief

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Craig Marks is no longer EIC of Spin: Marks tells Poynter via email he’s out. He was the publication’s fourth editor in two years. Stephen Blackwell, SpinMedia’s fourth CEO in the same amount of time, told me Monday that he had “high hopes” for the publication, and that it would add more editing talent soon. (Poynter) | A quick phone call with Marks: “It was a mutual and amicable decision that I would leave,” he said. “With the new CEO and the new regime it felt like the right time to part ways. I would like to pursue other interests including trying to finally get a bead on my next book.” Marks, who was executive editor at the magazine in the ’90s (I worked with him then for a spell then, in my first media job), took the job in June and says the split was not performance-related. I asked him whether he felt like his brief stay there — a summer job? — had been a waste of time. “No, not at all,” he said. “It was really great, even if it was brief, to be back at Spin and to help restore and revive a publication that meant a lot and means a lot to people, and I sincerely hope I helped lay the groundwork for Spin to be good and relevant and meaningful.”
  2. Somaly Mam says she didn’t lie: “This past May, Mam’s life imploded after a Newsweek report left the impression that she had fabricated her life story and had encouraged a girl in her care to lie that she had been trafficked,” Abigail Pesta writes. “While in Cambodia, I investigated the claims against Mam and spoke to people cited in the Newsweek piece, three of whom said their views were misrepresented. One of the three, identified in Newsweek as a woman, is, in fact, a man.” (Marie Claire)
  3. Mark Ruffalo visited The Boston Globe: The actor was researching his role as reporter Michael Rezendes in “Spotlight,” a film about the Globe’s reporting on the Catholic Church’s sex-abuse scandal. (The Boston Globe)
  4. “On this beat if you fuck up with the national office, you’re fucked”: Dave McKenna writes about the uneven power relationships between the league and its media “partners” that makes independent NFL coverage very difficult. (Deadspin) | Related: Advertisers, including Anheuser-Busch and McDonald’s, have said they’re not satisfied with the NFL’s response to child abuse and domestic violence charges against players. (ESPN)
  5. Influential LGBT people in media: NPR reporter Ari Shapiro (currently enduring the sound of bagpipes as he covers the Scots referendum), Janet Mock, Re/code’s Ina Fried and Capital’s Tom McGeveran make the top 50. (Advocate)
  6. New offices for Gawker publications: “For want of others seeking the role, we are the guardians of independent media,” Gawker Media honcho Nick Denton (No. 7 on the Advocate list) says in a memo to staffers, telling them they’ll soon be blogging from 114 Fifth Ave. (Re/code) | “The new office is just a few blocks from Gawker competitors Buzzfeed and Business Insider, and is in the same building as social news site Mashable and Pierre Omidyar’s First Look Media, which is where former Gawker editor John Cook currently works.” (Capital)
  7. Is it plagiarism? Ben Mullin made a handy flowchart for editors and media watchers. (Poynter)
  8. Journalist murdered in Afghanistan: Palwasha Tokhi Miranzai “was repeatedly stabbed by unidentified men inside her house in Mazar-e-Sharif city.” (Khaama Press)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: A scary waterspout on the front of the Pensacola News Journal. (Courtesy Newseum)

    pensacola-09172014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Guy Vidra will become the new CEO of The New Republic. He is the general manager of Yahoo News. Owner Chris Hughes will remain as publisher but will no longer be editor-in-chief. (The New Republic) | Dana Liebelson will be a political reporter at HuffPost Politics. She’s a reporter for Mother Jones. (Email) | Ashley Codianni is now a senior producer and digital correspondent for CNN Politics Digital. She’s Mashable’s director of news video. (Fishbowl DC) | Cara Parks has been named executive editor at Modern Farmer. She was previously a freelancer and deputy managing editor at Foreign Policy. (Observer.com) | Suejin Yang has been named vice president and general manager of digital entertainment at People and Entertainment Weekly. Previously, she was vice president of Bravo Digital Media. (Fishbowl NY) | Job of the day: ProPublica is looking for a research editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
0 Comments
zakaria

Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say: Mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort tell Poynter they will have another post on Our Bad Media later this morning outlining what they say are examples of Fareed Zakaria lifting text, this time for his CNN show, “GPS.” Here’s a video that will accompany the piece.

    @blippoblappo and @crushingbort’s last post, in August, outlined suspect passages in Zakaria’s 2008 book, “The Post-American World” and in stories in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs. Neither W.W. Norton, which published the book, Newsweek, Foreign Affairs nor Atlantic Media, where Zakaria is now a contributing editor, replied to Poynter’s requests for comment.

  2. Foley family describes frustrations with U.S. government: The FBI first told James Foley‘s family they’d be prosecuted if they paid ransom to his captors, then advised them prosecution would be unlikely, Rukmini Callimachi reports. “Once the family made it clear they wanted to pay, the bureau instructed them to stall, according to a consultant working on the hostage crisis.” (NYT) | “A policy against paying ransoms makes sense — but making the family of a captured journalist feel like criminals does not.” (Vox) | “It was very upsetting because we were essentially told to trust… that the way they were handling things would bring our son home,” Foley’s mother, Diane Foley, said last week. (ABC News) | The family’s new fund “will push for the discussion, development and coordination of policies that are consistent, transparent, and accountable to all American citizens held captive world-wide.” (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  3. RCFP hires a litigation director: Katie Townsend will help the organization sue those who impede newsgathering. (CJR) | “The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) filed an application on Friday with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg challenging current UK legislation on mass surveillance and its threat to journalism.” (Index on Censorship)
  4. Free cops for Fox News honcho: “According to police records obtained by Gawker, the Cresskill [New Jersey] Police Department supplies 24/7 security to [Roger] Ailes’ residence there—apparently at no cost to Ailes himself—and otherwise delivers on-demand police services to his family, regardless of whether or not they are in any obvious danger.” (Gawker)
  5. Julian Assange did a chat on Gawker: “Opinion polling from the US just two months ago shows that WikiLeaks has majority support of people under the age of 40,” Assange told PootMcFruitcakes in the chat. (Gawker) | “Pale nerd king,” “seed-spilling sex creep,” “Real-life The Matrix extra”: Abby Ohlheiser on Gawker’s history of describing Assange. (WP)
  6. What newspapers can do: They have to offer “engaging and worthwhile material,” Rem Rieder writes, conveying API chief’s Tom Rosenstiel‘s speech at the ASNE convention Monday. “They certainly are not going to out BuzzFeed BuzzFeed at the clickbait game.” (USA Today) | Alexander Nazaryan: Journalism might not be saved, but “it isn’t quite as doomed as we thought several years ago.” (Newsweek)
  7. Let’s talk about native ads: California Sunday Magazine, which plans a launch next month, will feature “story advertising” — “We are doing one series of story advertising with Nest that feels like a gallery exhibit with prominent illustrators and artists and what home means to them,” Chas Edwards tells Kara Swisher. “But we are also making sure we are very transparent.” (Re/code) | Josh Benton: “Why is native advertising so appealing to publishers? Let’s start with the obvious: money. You may have heard that a lot of news companies are in need of it.” (Nieman) | The New York Times Monday published the second of four planned native ads on Mashable. The first was called “11 Inspiring Videos That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity.” (Poynter)
  8. No comment from the bespokesperson?: The New York Times used the word bespoke “more than any other US publication in the past three months, according to a Nexis search, with “bespoke” appearing nearly three dozen times, excluding in proper names.” (CJR)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The Buenos Aires Herald fronts a photo of a man who signals his support of Scottish independence with a complicated hairstyle. (Courtesy the Newseum)

    bah-09162014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ryan Nobles is now a national correspondent for CNN. Previously, he was an anchor and reporter for WWBT in Richmond, Virginia. (CNN) | Preetma Singh has been named market director for Nylon. Formerly, she was market editor at WSJ Magazine. She’s also the drummer for Vomitface. (Email) | Danielle Jones has been named executive vice president for expansion at Politico. Previously, she was deputy editor-in-chief there. Miki King has been named executive vice president for operations at Politico. Previously, she was senior vice president of business development there. (Politico) | Carol Morello will be a diplomatic correspondent at The Washington Post. She covers the census and demographics there. (The Washington Post) | Theodore Kim is now a homepage editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was a mobile and tablet editor at The Washington Post. (Sched) | Marin Cogan will be a contributing editor at New York Magazine. She’s a writer-at-large for the National Journal. (Politico) | Tim Evans will be a consumer advocate for The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a court reporter there. (@starwatchtim) | Les Zaitz has been named investigations editor at The Oregonian. He is a senior investigative reporter there. (Email) | Job of the day: The San Jose Mercury News is looking for a Silicon Valley reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Get the latest media news delivered to your inbox.


Select the newsletter(s) you'd like to receive:
Page 2 of 71234567