Google’s plan to speed up mobile news is gaining traction

Google's headquarters in Mountain View, California. (AP photo)

Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, California. (AP photo)

Accelerated Mobile Pages, Google’s new initiative aimed at making the mobile Web load faster, has drawn adherents from the realms of analytics, advertising and publishing, according to an announcement from two Google executives released today.

The announcement comes more than a month after Google debuted Accelerate Mobile Pages, or AMP, a proposed Web standard that imposes constraints on the bulkier elements of Web design to ensure that pages load quickly. AMP was greeted at launch by a mixture of applause and hand-wringing from digital media experts, who alternatively hailed the measure as a much-needed remedy for sluggish mobile article pages or an effort from Google to dictate how the Web should be configured.

Now comes word via Google that AMP’s standards have been adopted by several bellwethers of Web publishing since its Oct. Read more


Here are 80 journalism internships and fellowships for application season

For most journalism students, the biggest step toward finding employment isn’t passing the final. It isn’t acing midterms, turning in homework or even meeting deadlines at the college paper.

The most critical period in journalism school is the three-month window stretching from September to November informally known as internship application season. Getting professional experience and making contacts through an internship can mean the difference between landing a job or being unemployed after commencement.

That season is upon us. So write up a cover letter, polish your resumé and start applying to the internships listed below that pique your interest. Application deadlines for some of the best internships are in less than a week, so don’t wait!

If you have questions about this list or know of other internships I’ve missed, send me an email: Read more


Poynter, Google, SPJ partner to provide digital training for newsrooms

In a bid to train journalists in digital tools, The Poynter Institute is partnering with Google and the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) to train 10 professionals, who will then teach journalists how to best use Google tools.

The training will take place on August 31 and September 1 at the Poynter Institute. These professionals will then go out to train journalists at newsrooms and conferences. Each person will conduct at least three training sessions. Poynter has had previous endeavors such as ‘Train the trainers,’ but this is a new kind of initiative where the aim is focused on important digital tools used in newsrooms.

The ten participants include journalists from digital organizations including The Verge, as well as local TV stations and newspapers such as The Denver Post. Read more


Publishing news direct to Facebook is a big step — but the Apocalypse is not upon us

Sceeenshot from Facebook

Sceeenshot from Facebook

My read on Facebook’s deal with nine news publishers to post some material direct to the platform: yes, it’s a significant business development but by no means apocalyptic, as some commentators are suggesting.

Here’s why:

Good company: It was artful of Facebook and the publishers to assemble nine prominent brands to launch the experiment  — including new media exemplar BuzzFeed, magazine-based National Geographic and four international titles.

Were this just The New York Times, for instance, one would wonder whether the opportunity and deal terms were a one-off match to their business situation.  Not so with this roster.

Favorable revenue split:  The publishers will (for now at least) get 100 percent of revenue for ads they sell and 70 percent of those Facebook sells.  Read more

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Look to the past for lessons on the news industry showdown with Facebook

News and commentary this week that leading news organizations are close to striking a deal to publish directly to Facebook’s platform reminds me, and others, of an industry faceoff six years ago with Google.

As you may recall, Rupert Murdoch had denounced Google for “stealing” content in its news summaries.  William Dean Singleton, chairman of MediaNews and the Associated Press board, threatened a war to protect newspapers’ copyright at AP’s and NAA’s 2009 conferences in San Diego. Google’s Eric Schmidt spoke to the NAA and faced a number of hostile questions.

We all know how that turned out.  Google won.  They continue publishing Google news summaries and referring traffic via search. Except to the AP itself, Google generally hasn’t paid for news it borrows. An AP-led effort to organize a licensing collective (NewsRight), never found its legs.  Read more

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No interviews at premiere for ‘The Interview’

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. No interviews at premiere of ‘The Interview’

    "Sony Pictures said Wednesday that no broadcast media will be invited to cover the film's red carpet Thursday in Los Angeles and no interviews will be granted to print reporters at the screening." (AP)

  2. The Washington Post found more people Rolling Stone didn't interview

    T. Rees Shapiro spoke with three friends of Jackie's that Rolling Stone apparently wrote about but never actually spoke to. (The Washington Post) | Here's a succinct roundup of everything that's happened up to now. (Huffington Post) | UVA's Cavalier Daily originally published something no one else had, Ben Mullin reports -- a letter from Jackie's roommate. (Poynter) | | Related: Geneva Overholser says the news media convention of not naming sexual assault victims "is a particular slice of silence that I believe has consistently undermined society’s attempts to deal effectively with rape." (Geneva Overholser) | Related: Alexander Zaitchik, who wrote a 2013 Rolling Stone story about Barrett Brown, says he wasn't present for a scene he described in detail.

Read more
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Photo Sphere, a free and simple tool, gives interactivity and depth to stories

I have tried many programs and apps over the years to capture 360-degree interactive photographs. None has been as easy to use as Google’s Photo Sphere Camera app. Android users have had this at their fingertips for more than a year but the iPhone app is fairly new.

This is PhotoSphere’s instructional video. It really is as easy as it looks.

Photo Sphere tells me to aim my iPhone camera at an orange dot (the dot is blue on Android phones) on the screen. When I get it aligned, the camera snaps, and I do this over and over as I turn in a 360-degree motion. Once I get all the way around, I tilt up to capture the ceiling and down to capture the floor. Read more

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Poynter offers free training from Google

News University

The Poynter Institute Tuesday is offering a day of training on tools from Google, taught by the company’s own experts.

The training, which will be offered for free courtesy the Google for Media team, consists of six 60-minute presentations on tools including search, mapping, data and Hangouts. The sessions are designed for journalists from varied backgrounds, including video and photojournalists, writers, bloggers and producers.

Here’s the schedule:

  • 9 a.m. Google research tools (search, trends, correlate and Public Data Explorer)
  • 10:15 a.m. General mapping overview (Google Maps Engine, Maps API, Google Fusion Tables)
  • 11:15 a.m. Customs maps training (More with Google Maps Engine and Fusion Tables)
  • 1:15 p.m. Learn how to use Google Earth to supplement stories on newscasts or websites
  • 2:15 p.m. Discover how to use Google+ and Hangouts on Air to interact with audiences and create live video broadcasts
  • 3:30 p.m.
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Google forced by European law to remove positive article

Worcester News | The Guardian

Google has been forced by Europe’s “Right to Be Forgotten” law to remove an article about an artist named Dan Roach from its search results. The article ran in the U.K.’s Worcester News in 2009, and unlike many of the articles memory-holed by the law, was positive.

Roach objected to the piece, however, because it showed work that “bears little resemblance to the paintings I’m now making,” he told the News. He added: “The decision to ask for the link to be removed from Google was based on no more than a wish to highlight my new work, rather than the old.”

The new Worcester News article helpfully reproduces the photo from the 2009 article.

The ruling has caused the search giant to vanish articles subjects find objectionable: The Guardian, for instance, lost links to articles about Dougie McDonald, a Scottish soccer referee who retired after a report said he lied about why he reversed a penalty. Read more


Career Beat: Former NFL wide receiver Donte Stallworth joins HuffPost

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Michael Bloomberg will replace Daniel Doctoroff as chief executive officer of Bloomberg LP. Previously, Bloomberg was mayor of New York City. (New York Times)
  • Gina Sanders is now president of Condé Nast Global Development. She was president and CEO of Fairchild Fashion Media. (Condé Nast)
  • Brian Olsavsky will be chief financial officer for, Inc. He is the company’s vice president of finance. (Amazon)
  • Donte Stallworth is a politics fellow at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was a coaching intern with the Baltimore Ravens. Before that, he was an NFL wide receiver. (HuffPost Politics)
  • Chris Meighan is now design director of The Washington Post’s mobile initiative.
Read more
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