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Publishing news direct to Facebook is a big step — but the Apocalypse is not upon us

Sceeenshot from Facebook

Sceeenshot from Facebook

My read on Facebook’s deal with nine news publishers to post some material direct to the platform: yes, it’s a significant business development but by no means apocalyptic, as some commentators are suggesting.

Here’s why:

Good company: It was artful of Facebook and the publishers to assemble nine prominent brands to launch the experiment  — including new media exemplar BuzzFeed, magazine-based National Geographic and four international titles.

Were this just The New York Times, for instance, one would wonder whether the opportunity and deal terms were a one-off match to their business situation.  Not so with this roster.

Favorable revenue split:  The publishers will (for now at least) get 100 percent of revenue for ads they sell and 70 percent of those Facebook sells.  Read more

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Look to the past for lessons on the news industry showdown with Facebook

News and commentary this week that leading news organizations are close to striking a deal to publish directly to Facebook’s platform reminds me, and others, of an industry faceoff six years ago with Google.

As you may recall, Rupert Murdoch had denounced Google for “stealing” content in its news summaries.  William Dean Singleton, chairman of MediaNews and the Associated Press board, threatened a war to protect newspapers’ copyright at AP’s and NAA’s 2009 conferences in San Diego. Google’s Eric Schmidt spoke to the NAA and faced a number of hostile questions.

We all know how that turned out.  Google won.  They continue publishing Google news summaries and referring traffic via search. Except to the AP itself, Google generally hasn’t paid for news it borrows. An AP-led effort to organize a licensing collective (NewsRight), never found its legs.  Read more

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No interviews at premiere for ‘The Interview’

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. No interviews at premiere of ‘The Interview’

    "Sony Pictures said Wednesday that no broadcast media will be invited to cover the film's red carpet Thursday in Los Angeles and no interviews will be granted to print reporters at the screening." (AP)

  2. The Washington Post found more people Rolling Stone didn't interview

    T. Rees Shapiro spoke with three friends of Jackie's that Rolling Stone apparently wrote about but never actually spoke to. (The Washington Post) | Here's a succinct roundup of everything that's happened up to now. (Huffington Post) | UVA's Cavalier Daily originally published something no one else had, Ben Mullin reports -- a letter from Jackie's roommate. (Poynter) | | Related: Geneva Overholser says the news media convention of not naming sexual assault victims "is a particular slice of silence that I believe has consistently undermined society’s attempts to deal effectively with rape." (Geneva Overholser) | Related: Alexander Zaitchik, who wrote a 2013 Rolling Stone story about Barrett Brown, says he wasn't present for a scene he described in detail.

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Photo Sphere, a free and simple tool, gives interactivity and depth to stories

I have tried many programs and apps over the years to capture 360-degree interactive photographs. None has been as easy to use as Google’s Photo Sphere Camera app. Android users have had this at their fingertips for more than a year but the iPhone app is fairly new.

This is PhotoSphere’s instructional video. It really is as easy as it looks.

Photo Sphere tells me to aim my iPhone camera at an orange dot (the dot is blue on Android phones) on the screen. When I get it aligned, the camera snaps, and I do this over and over as I turn in a 360-degree motion. Once I get all the way around, I tilt up to capture the ceiling and down to capture the floor. Read more

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Poynter offers free training from Google

News University

The Poynter Institute Tuesday is offering a day of training on tools from Google, taught by the company’s own experts.

The training, which will be offered for free courtesy the Google for Media team, consists of six 60-minute presentations on tools including search, mapping, data and Hangouts. The sessions are designed for journalists from varied backgrounds, including video and photojournalists, writers, bloggers and producers.

Here’s the schedule:

  • 9 a.m. Google research tools (search, trends, correlate and Public Data Explorer)
  • 10:15 a.m. General mapping overview (Google Maps Engine, Maps API, Google Fusion Tables)
  • 11:15 a.m. Customs maps training (More with Google Maps Engine and Fusion Tables)
  • 1:15 p.m. Learn how to use Google Earth to supplement stories on newscasts or websites
  • 2:15 p.m. Discover how to use Google+ and Hangouts on Air to interact with audiences and create live video broadcasts
  • 3:30 p.m.
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Google forced by European law to remove positive article

Worcester News | The Guardian

Google has been forced by Europe’s “Right to Be Forgotten” law to remove an article about an artist named Dan Roach from its search results. The article ran in the U.K.’s Worcester News in 2009, and unlike many of the articles memory-holed by the law, was positive.

Roach objected to the piece, however, because it showed work that “bears little resemblance to the paintings I’m now making,” he told the News. He added: “The decision to ask for the link to be removed from Google was based on no more than a wish to highlight my new work, rather than the old.”

The new Worcester News article helpfully reproduces the photo from the 2009 article.

The ruling has caused the search giant to vanish articles subjects find objectionable: The Guardian, for instance, lost links to articles about Dougie McDonald, a Scottish soccer referee who retired after a report said he lied about why he reversed a penalty. Read more

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Career Beat: Former NFL wide receiver Donte Stallworth joins HuffPost

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Michael Bloomberg will replace Daniel Doctoroff as chief executive officer of Bloomberg LP. Previously, Bloomberg was mayor of New York City. (New York Times)
  • Gina Sanders is now president of Condé Nast Global Development. She was president and CEO of Fairchild Fashion Media. (Condé Nast)
  • Brian Olsavsky will be chief financial officer for Amazon.com, Inc. He is the company’s vice president of finance. (Amazon)
  • Donte Stallworth is a politics fellow at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was a coaching intern with the Baltimore Ravens. Before that, he was an NFL wide receiver. (HuffPost Politics)
  • Chris Meighan is now design director of The Washington Post’s mobile initiative.
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Jill Abramson doesn’t return NYT’s email

mediawiremorningGood morning. Almost there. Let’s go. Read more

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World Cup was most talked-about sporting event in Facebook history

Here’s our roundup of the top digital and social media stories you should know about (and from Andrew Beaujon, 10 media stories to start your day):

— At journalism.co.uk, Abigail Edge rounds up seven tips from Google’s Dan Russell on how to use search more effectively in your newsgathering — including how to use Google Trends, and when it makes sense to search by color.

— AllFacebook’s David Cohen reports that “350 million Facebook users generated 3 billion interactions” during the 2014 FIFA World Cup, “making it the most-talked-about sporting event in the social network’s history.”

— Nieman Lab’s Joseph Lichterman explains how some news organizations “are stashing staff around the world to keep content fresh.” The rise of mobile means “readers are demanding news content earlier and earlier, and that doesn’t line up with how most newsroom schedules have traditionally been structured.” Read more

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Glenn Greenwald returns, Daily Mail removes Clooney story

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. U.S. officials warned Muslims about Greenwald story: Glenn Greenwald and Murtaza Hussain reported in a piece published early Wednesday that the FBI and NSA have “covertly monitored the emails of prominent Muslim-Americans.” Prior to publication, they write, Justice Department officials “were reaching out to Muslim-American leaders across the country to warn them that the piece would contain errors and misrepresentations, even though it had not yet been written.” (The Intercept) | The authors will discuss the story on Reddit. (@ggreenwald)
  2. New Yorker plans changes to paywall: All articles will be available free for three months starting July 21, then it plans to charge “its most avid readers through a subscription plan.” (NYT)
  3. BuzzFeed reporter “would suck” at clickbait: BuzzFeed “hired me because they want me to do what I’ve done before: big investigative projects,” Chris Hamby writes in an AMA.
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