Articles about "Homicide Watch"


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Creating new forms of journalism that put readers in charge

It’s been 20 years since the Internet began to disrupt journalism. It has turned our business upside down, but it’s also given us a new canvas to invent different ways of presenting information. It’s time to start reimagining the news … Read more

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For 7 years, L.A. Times’ Homicide Report has wrested stories from grim data

We’ve heard a lot about Chris and Laura Amico’s Homicide Watch – and for good reason. The site tracks homicides in Washington, D.C., (and, as of just over a year ago, Chicago and Trenton) from police report to conviction, giving … Read more

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Homicide Watch reaches fundraising goal, but how viable is its business model long-term?

Homicide Watch | Kickstarter | New York Times
With just three days left in its month-long Kickstarter campaign, Homicide Watch has reached the goal of $40,000 in pledges from more than 1,000 people to sustain the site for another year.

The Kickstarter campaign crossed its fundraising goal.
Since its launch in 2010, Homicide Watch has used a database as well as news articles to track homicide cases and victims in Washington. It was run solely by a two-person team, Laura and Chris Amico. The new funding will pay stipends for a "student reporting lab" of interns to run the innovative news site, as Laura Amico becomes a Nieman-Berkman Fellow. Amico writes: (more...)
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Homicide Watch faces uncertain future, established news beats as databases

Homicide Watch | Kickstarter | Nieman Lab
Homicide Watch, the news startup that tracks homicide cases in Washington, D.C., through data and reporting, is taking a break.

The wife-husband team that founded it, Laura and Chris Amico, are moving to Massachusetts next week for Laura's one-year Nieman fellowship at Harvard. The site may find some new life through a Kickstarter fundraising campaign that would pay interns to staff it.

Either way, the project has made its mark. (more...)
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Clay Shirky: Washington Post should emulate Homicide Watch D.C.

“Homicide Watch provides far broader crime coverage than the Post, coverage of clear value to the community, and does so in a way that makes that value cumulative, rather than just spinning out updates on the hamster wheel. In comparison with the Post, though, the most important thing about Homicide Watch is that they do all this with two employees: Laura Amico as the editorial voice, and her husband, Chris, who developed the platform and works part time.

“When a two-person outfit can cover such a critical issue better than the reigning local paper, with much less overhead, it’s evidence that doing more with less is possible, but it’s also evidence that this requires far more than reducing expenses. Homicide Watch isn’t just a tight operation (though it is that); it’s a brilliant re-imagining of what it means to be a news outlet.”

Clay Shirky

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5 provocative ideas sparked by women in media

As 2012 gets moving, I thought I’d be the very last person to list some of the ideas that have gotten stuck in my mind from over the last year.

Last year, I wrote a list of lessons I’d learned Read more

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Homicide Watch D.C. uses clues in site search queries to ID homicide victim

One Reporter's Notebook
Laura Amico, editor of Homicide Watch D.C., describes how she used site analytics to identify a homicide victim — again. Early Sunday morning, she saw a police department news alert stating that a juvenile male had been killed. She wrote an initial post. When she looked at Google Analytics, she saw a few different search queries that seemed to be related to the killing: People were searching for information on a killing the night before on the same street as in the news alert. After an hour of searching on Twitter and Facebook, she thought she had found the victim, a 17-year-old with a name similar to the one people were searching for. "I held on to my story until I was certain, but soon one of Jamar’s friends posted an RIP message to Twitter and linked to my initial report of the homicide. It was the confirmation I needed to run my story." (more...)
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Police reporter aims to blog every murder in Washington, D.C.

Washington Post
Laura Norton Amico's mission: "Mark every death. Remember every victim. Follow every case." Her Homicide Watch D.C. links to obituaries, Tweets and Facebook tribute pages; posts relevant court documents; and invites comments. Annys Shin reports Amico had been a crime reporter in Santa Rosa and couldn't find the same job in Washington, so she decided to create one.
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