Articles about "Huffington Post"


Jill Abramson

Jill Abramson would like a magazine job

Good morning. We’re almost there. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Area man to appear on television: Chuck Todd will interview President Obama for his first episode of “Meet the Press” on Sunday. (Politico)
  2. HuffPost won’t talk about Jimmy Soni: HuffPost parent AOL was investigating allegations of sexual harrassment by its former managing editor, J.K. Trotter reports. (Gawker) | “Rumors have been swirling inside the company for the past couple of months about Soni’s alleged inappropriate behavior with female Huffington Post fellows.” (Capital)
  3. ONA bends to pressure on its Ferguson panel: “We did not intend to overlook great work at the local level,” Trevor Knoblich writes. “We began today looking for a local person to add to our session.” (ONA) | Earlier: “Why are no local outlets represented in ONA’s Ferguson keynote?” (Poynter) | Related: Kristen Hare is still curating her Twitter list of people reporting from Ferguson.
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Wiegel, Bazelon leave Slate

Huffington Post | Capital | Slate

Emily Bazelon and Dave Weigel will leave Slate, continuing a shakeup that began after former editor David Plotz stepped down as top editor in July.

Bazelon, a senior editor for Slate since 2005, will be a staff writer for New York Times Magazine, where she has been a contributor, according to a release from The Times.

In a statement, New York Times Magazine editor Jake Silverstein said he was “giddy” about the hire.

Weigel will join Bloomberg’s as-yet unnamed politics vertical, Michael Calderone reports for The Huffington Post.

Wiegel wrote about his departure from Slate, saying that his move was inspired by his appreciation for the team at Bloomberg:

This is still my favorite magazine and I’m only leaving it because Bloomberg’s putting together — I will try to avoid corporate-speak — an ambitious political magazine run by the sort of geniuses who made Bloomberg Businessweek into a great print mag, and New York’s political coverage a daily must-read.

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Bar b cue barbecue fire BBQ coal fire iron grill

Texas Monthly BBQ editor travels ‘from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket’

Happy Labor Day weekend. Andrew Beaujon’s back on Tuesday. Thanks for reading this week.

  1. Ask him about his cholesterol: The nation’s only full-time barbecue editor — no, he doesn’t weigh 400 pounds — understands why readers are obsessed with his health: “My job requires that I travel from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket, one of the fattiest cuts on the steer. And I can’t forget to order the pork ribs, sausage, and beef ribs,” Daniel Vaughn writes. Former Texas Monthly editor in chief Jake Silverstein says Vaughn has “figured out how to make the barbecue lifestyle compatible with staying above ground.” (Texas Monthly)
  2. What to do when you’re arrested: Whether it happened in Ferguson or elsewhere, first you should call the station where you were booked to get your arrest report.
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Diane Sawyer

After Sawyer’s final ABC World News broadcast, all 3 nightly anchors are now white men

Yo. Here are some media stories.

  1. Is the Yo app ridiculous or revolutionary? That’s the question Cory Blair asks. It’s definitely the former, but it has potential to be the latter, especially now that users can send links and not just notifications with no content. Robert Hernandez has an interesting idea for what news organizations like The Washington Post could use Yo for: “whenever an unarmed person dies at the hands of the police, or every time somebody is killed with a gun.” (American Journalism Review)
  2. Diane Sawyer anchors her final ABC World News broadcast: But she’s staying with the network. David Muir is her successor. “Now, all three nightly news anchors are once again white men,” Brian Stelter notes. (CNN)
  3. NPR’s Michel Martin heads to Ferguson: The former “Tell Me More” host will lead a town hall meeting today.
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Career Beat: Former assistant director of Pew journalism project buys newspaper

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • John Batter will be CEO of Gracenote. Previously, he was CEO of M-GO. (Tech Crunch)
  • Mark Jurkowitz is the owner of the Outer Banks Sentinel in Nags Head, North Carolina. Previously, he was the associate director of Pew Research Center’s journalism project. (Romenesko)
  • Jon Ward is a senior political correspondent with Yahoo News. Previously, he was a political reporter for the Huffington Post. (Politico)
  • Shauna Rempel is now a social media strategist for Global News. Previously, she was social media and technology editor at the Toronto Star. (Muck Rack)
  • Chris Tisch is now business editor for the Tampa Bay Times. Previously, he was assistant metro editor there.
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foley 2

The last email sent to Foley’s family

Good morning. Your weekend is in sight. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. James Foley’s last months: Cassandra Vinograd tells how James Foley‘s family communicated with his captors. (NBC News) | “Some messages were political and some were financial.” (CNN) | The last email sent to his family (GlobalPost) | Shane Bauer: “Like my family, [Foley's family] probably sometimes thought they should do more to try and convince his captors to let him go. Other times they likely reasoned they should stay quiet, hoping that silence would give the hostage takers the opportunity to quietly release him. It’s a hideous position to be in.” (Mother Jones) | NYT editorial: “There is no simple answer on whether to submit to terrorist extortion.” (NYT) || Foley’s family establishes journalism scholarship at Marquette.
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James Foley

U.S. tried to rescue James Foley

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The U.S. tried to rescue James Foley, and it declined to pay ransom: Islamic State “pressed the United States to provide a multimillion-dollar ransom for his release,” Rukmini Callimachi reports. Unlike many European countries, the U.S. and Britain will not pay ransoms for hostages. The terror group holds other Americans, including Time freelancer Steven J. Sotloff. (NYT) | David Rohde: “The divergent U.S. and European approach to abductions fails to deter captors or consistently safeguard victims.” (Reuters) | Administration officials yesterday confirmed that U.S. Special Operations forces tried to rescue Foley, but the op “was not ultimately successful because the hostages were not present . . . at the site of the operation.” (WP) | Media blackouts “don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages,” James Harkin writes.
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BuzzFeed and Facebook Host Bowties & Burgers During 2014 White House Correspondents' Association Dinner

Commenters hate HuffPost’s new Facebook-only commenting system

The Huffington Post

The Huffington Post’s U.S. site and mobile apps will shift to using only Facebook comments starting Monday at noon, HuffPost CTO Otto Toth announced.

“This is far from an an end to conversation; it’s the start of conversation where you want to have it — and where you’ve been having it already,” he wrote.

Readers are having a Facebook conversation under Toth’s post, but many of them claim it’s the last one they’ll have before abandoning the site. The most-liked comment: “Now deleting my account, which I’ve used since 2011. If I wanted this integrated with Facebook, that’s how I would have logged in. Thanks for the memories.”… Read more

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keyboard

HuffPost policy banishes trolls — and drives away some frequent commenters

When The Huffington Post announced that all commenters — not just new registrants — would be required starting Dec. 10 to link their profiles to Facebook accounts verified with a phone number and have their real names displayed when commenting, the reaction was fierce. Commenters, many of whom had left thousands of comments and amassed thousands of “fans” over five or more years on the site, felt betrayed.

When I asked about the reasoning behind the policy via email last month, HuffPost Director of Community Tim McDonald referred me to comments from Arianna Huffington reported by GigaOm earlier in the year: “Trolls are just getting more and more aggressive and uglier and I just came from London where there are rape and death threats.” And: “I feel that freedom of expression is given to people who stand up for what they say and [are] not hiding behind anonymity.… Read more

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Commenters on HuffPost mobile apps will soon need Facebook verification too

Amid the uproar over the Huffington Post’s announcement that commenting now requires Facebook verification — which itself requires supplying Facebook with a phone number — some users found a loophole: They could still use their old usernames (and not their real names) when commenting via HuffPost mobile apps.… Read more

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