Articles about "Huffington Post"


Career Beat: Ad Age gets new editorial director

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • Eli Lake is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a national security correspondent. Josh Rogin is leaving The Daily Beast, where he’s a senior correspondent. (Huffington Post)
  • Simon Dumenco is editorial director at Advertising Age. Previously, he was a columnist there. (Ad Age)
  • Fran Unsworth is now director of the World Service Group at the BBC. She’s deputy director of news and current affairs. (The Guardian)
  • Chris Moody will be a senior correspondent for CNN Politics Digital. Previously, he was a political correspondent for Yahoo News. (Politico)
  • Jeffrey Schneider is founding his own PR firm, Schneider Global Strategy. He’s a senior vice president and spokesperson at ABC News. (ABC)
  • Sruthijith KK is now editor at Huffington Post India. Previously, he was editor of Quartz India. (Medianama)

Job of the day: U.S. News and World Report is looking for a Congress reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org Read more

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In Hong Kong, Apple Daily gets to deliver papers after days of blockades

Wall Street Journal | The Huffington Post | Committee to Protect Journalists

Readers in Hong Kong should get their copy of the pro-democracy newspaper Apple Daily on Friday.

For several days, “mobs have surrounded Apple Daily’s offices to intimidate staff and prevent distribution of the paper,” the Wall Street Journal wrote in an opinion piece on Tuesday.

Early Monday morning they blocked delivery trucks from exiting the complex by parking a tractor-trailer across the gate. Apple Daily staff eventually used a crane to load newspapers onto different trucks across a back wall, so newsstands got copies after a delay of about six hours.

This tweet, from the Journal’s Isabella Steger, says the papers made it out on Thursday night.

And from Bloomberg’s Fion Li:

On Monday, Apple Daily posted this image on its Facebook page, with an apology to readers who didn’t get their newspapers.

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On Wednesday, Matt Sheehan wrote for Huffington Post’s The World Post about blocked deliveries and the paper itself.

With one of the largest readerships in Hong Kong, Apple Daily is known for its defiant pro-democracy positions, shrill and sensational reporting style, and occasionally lax standards for fact-checking.

The paper is run by brash media mogul Jimmy Lai, a man who makes no secret of his deep loathing for the Chinese government. As a 12-year-old, Lai smuggled himself out of famine-stricken China in 1960 and into Hong Kong. There, he went on to build a clothing and media empire that he now deploys in a running grudge match with Beijing. His paper subsidizes pro-democracy advertisements and has in the past printed two-page spreads that can serve as anti-government banners at protests.

While some local journalists cringe at what they see as the paper’s affinity for gossip and sex scandals, they say it remains one of the few bulwarks against a creeping pro-Beijing influence in Hong Kong media.

Sheehan includes this video from Wednesday, with Apple Daily employees and anti-occupy protesters.

On Thursday, Bob Dietz wrote for the Committee to Protect Journalists about “Hong Kong’s media battlefield”, including how journalists have been treated. Dietz also writes that while the Apple Daily has been physically blocked, it has had to fight online, too.

Tuesday, spokesman Mark Simon told a reporter who has been working with CPJ, “More disturbing to us than the street protests is the continued denial of service attacks on our website. At times they bring down our website for up to an hour.”

Who is carrying out the attacks? “We always had a good firewall, which we have improved upon. That makes us think the attacks on us are of a governmental scale. Our audience tends to be local and across the border. We certainly believe attacks are coming from the entity that would most benefit from silencing Next Media [Apple's parent company]. That’s what we’ll say on the matter,” Simon said.

Here’s a Twitter list of journalists covering the protests in Hong Kong. Read more

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Jill Abramson

Jill Abramson would like a magazine job

mediawiremorningGood morning. We’re almost there. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Area man to appear on television: Chuck Todd will interview President Obama for his first episode of “Meet the Press” on Sunday. (Politico)
  2. HuffPost won’t talk about Jimmy Soni: HuffPost parent AOL was investigating allegations of sexual harrassment by its former managing editor, J.K. Trotter reports. (Gawker) | “Rumors have been swirling inside the company for the past couple of months about Soni’s alleged inappropriate behavior with female Huffington Post fellows.” (Capital)
  3. ONA bends to pressure on its Ferguson panel: “We did not intend to overlook great work at the local level,” Trevor Knoblich writes. “We began today looking for a local person to add to our session.” (ONA) | Earlier: “Why are no local outlets represented in ONA’s Ferguson keynote?” (Poynter) | Related: Kristen Hare is still curating her Twitter list of people reporting from Ferguson.
  4. L.A. Times reporter shared drafts of stories with CIA: Ken Dilanian tells Ken Silverstein he “shouldn’t have” sent stories to CIA spokespeople before he ran them, and he “wouldn’t do it now.” He’s now an AP reporter. AP spokesperson Paul Colford told Silverstein AP is “satisfied that any pre-publication exchanges that Ken had with the CIA before joining AP were in pursuit of accuracy in his reporting on intelligence matters,” and that “we do not coordinate with government agencies on the phrasing of material.” (The Intercept) | Remember quote approval? Jeremy W. Peters reported in 2012 about the practice. (NYT) Many news orgs distanced themselves from it. (Poynter) | Former Washington Post reporter Daniel de Vise got in hot water later that month when Texas Observer revealed he had shared drafts with sources. (Texas Observer) | Then Post Executive Editor Marcus Brauchli clamped down on the practice. (Poynter) | In August of that year, NYT reporter Mark Mazzetti sent an advance copy of a Maureen Dowd column to a CIA spokesperson. (Politico)
  5. Stock of Politico article on Glenn Greenwald drops: An intensely weird Politico Magazine piece that claims “Greenwald Inc. has already peaked,” offering evidence like this: “‘I think there’s a bit of Snowden fatigue out there right now,’ said former NSA director Michael Hayden.” (Politico) | The story “is terrible, in precisely seven ways.” (WP) | “So Glenn Greenwald, having been up—on the strength of Edward Snowden’s decision to trust him with a collection of leaked classified documentation of the NSA’s immense and all but unchecked mass surveillance program—is due to be down. Because the NSA has stopped spying on everyone, hasn’t it?” (Gawker) | Dylan Byers: “I’m of the opinion, and was of the opinion, that [Greenwald] peaked more than a year ago.” (Politico)
  6. Time Inc. chief hints at a plan: CEO Joe Ripp “said he is taking cues from National Geographic’s transformation from a sleepy not-for-profit print publication into a ‘multimedia powerhouse’ in cable television and online.” (Re/code) | Related: At the same conference, Jill Abramson said, “I would like to be working at the highest quality kind of magazine.” (Re/code) | “As she took the stage, seated across from her interviewer, Re/code cofounder Kara Swisher, some in the audience could see she was wearing a piece of statement jewelry: a necklace shaped to spell the word ‘pushy.’” (Capital)
  7. Why Mike came back to Bloomberg: “The goal of increasing the company’s visibility is not about satisfying the former mayor’s ego, Mr. Doctoroff and others say, but rather increasing the demand for terminals,” Jonathan Mahler writes. “The logic is that the more visible Bloomberg becomes, the more likely newsmakers will be to give its reporters news that moves markets.” (NYT) | “Mr. Bloomberg is returning to a more competitive marketplace than the one he left in 2002 and to increasingly strained relations with the financial institutions that make up the company’s core customer base.” (WSJ)
  8. Adieu, Twitpic: “Unfortunately we do not have the resources to fend off a large company like Twitter to maintain our mark which we believe whole heartedly is rightfully ours.” (Twitpic Blog)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The New York Daily News remembers Joan Rivers. (Courtesy Newseum)

    nydn-09052014
     

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin. Robert Lopez will be communications director for California State University, Los Angeles. Previously, he was an investigative reporter for the Los Angeles Times. (LA Observed) | Robin Sproul will be vice president of public affairs for ABC News. Previously, she was Washington bureau chief there. Jonathan Greenberger will be ABC’s Washington bureau chief. He is executive producer of “This Week.” (ABC News) | Rebecca Nelson will be a staff correspondent at the National Journal. Previously, she was an assistant editor at The Washingtonian. (Fishbowl DC) | Dennis Rodkin will run a nursery in California. Previously, he was a reporter at Crain’s Chicago Business. (Crain’s) | Michael Wright will be CEO of DreamWorks Studios. Previously, he was head of programming for TBS, TNT and Turner Classic Movies. (New York Times) | Job of the day: The Associated Press is looking for an administrative correspondent in Austin, Texas. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Wiegel, Bazelon leave Slate

Huffington Post | Capital | Slate

Emily Bazelon and Dave Weigel will leave Slate, continuing a shakeup that began after former editor David Plotz stepped down as top editor in July.

Bazelon, a senior editor for Slate since 2005, will be a staff writer for New York Times Magazine, where she has been a contributor, according to a release from The Times.

In a statement, New York Times Magazine editor Jake Silverstein said he was “giddy” about the hire.

Weigel will join Bloomberg’s as-yet unnamed politics vertical, Michael Calderone reports for The Huffington Post.

Wiegel wrote about his departure from Slate, saying that his move was inspired by his appreciation for the team at Bloomberg:

This is still my favorite magazine and I’m only leaving it because Bloomberg’s putting together — I will try to avoid corporate-speak — an ambitious political magazine run by the sort of geniuses who made Bloomberg Businessweek into a great print mag, and New York’s political coverage a daily must-read.

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Bar b cue barbecue fire BBQ coal fire iron grill

Texas Monthly BBQ editor travels ‘from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket’

mediawiremorningHappy Labor Day weekend. Andrew Beaujon’s back on Tuesday. Thanks for reading this week.

  1. Ask him about his cholesterol: The nation’s only full-time barbecue editor — no, he doesn’t weigh 400 pounds — understands why readers are obsessed with his health: “My job requires that I travel from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket, one of the fattiest cuts on the steer. And I can’t forget to order the pork ribs, sausage, and beef ribs,” Daniel Vaughn writes. Former Texas Monthly editor in chief Jake Silverstein says Vaughn has “figured out how to make the barbecue lifestyle compatible with staying above ground.” (Texas Monthly)
  2. What to do when you’re arrested: Whether it happened in Ferguson or elsewhere, first you should call the station where you were booked to get your arrest report. If necessary, file a FOIA request, Kristen Hare reports. (Poynter)
  3. Ideas for redesigning breaking-news experience: Although Twitter has driven the Ferguson story, the platform could still do a better job at handling breaking news. Brandon Schmittling has some suggestions. Here’s one: “Add a check mark next to any link that you’ve already visited.” (Fast Company)
  4. James Foley’s captors waterboarded their prisoners: “The Islamic State beheaded Foley last week in apparent retaliation for U.S. airstrikes on Iraq, where the militant group has seized large swaths of territory. The group, which also controls parts of Syria, has threatened to kill another American, journalist Steven J. Sotloff.” (Washington Post) | Related: Earlier this month, Dean Baquet shifted his newsroom’s stance on calling waterboarding “torture.” (The New York Times) | Previously: The Times “tied itself in linguistic knots during the Bush years to avoid describing waterboarding as torture,” Michael Calderone wrote in 2012. (Huffington Post)
  5. HuffPost to host political debate: “Given the potential for brand growth and influence, and the migration of viewers to online video, an increasing number of newer, digital players jumping into the fray seems likely,” Joe Pompeo reports. (Capital New York)
  6. Twitter adds analytics for all: Just go to analytics.twitter.com and see how many people are really viewing and clicking your tweets. (Twitter)
  7. Are newsrooms obsessed with clicks? After two years of ethnographic research into the use of newsroom analytics, Angele Christin found journalists have a complex relationship with tracking traffic: “Many writers express cynical views about traffic and say that they do not care about page views. Yet they almost always check whether they are in the ‘top ten’ most read articles list.” (Nieman Lab)
  8. What bothers Mathew Ingram about pundits who claim the Internet is making journalism worse? “It’s the failure to appreciate that the complaints they have are the same ones that have been made about journalism for decades — combined with the unrestrained longing for some mythical golden age of journalism.” (GigaOm)
  9. ‘Rosewater’ trailer debuts: In the movie, written and directed by Jon Stewart, “Gael Garcia Bernal stars as Maziar Bahari, a journalist who was arrested and tortured in Iran for 118 days in 2009.” (Huffington Post)
  10. Newspaper front page of the day: The (New Orleans) Times-Picayune, selected by Kristen Hare. (Newseum)
    LA_TP
     
  11. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Jonathan Hunt will be global vice president for marketing and partnerships at Vox Media. Previously, he was global marketing director at Vice. (Adweek) | Kimberly Pierceall is now a gambling industry reporter for the Associated Press. Previously, she covered Irvine, California for the Orange County Register. (AP) | Ellen Crooke is now vice president of news for Gannett Broadcasting. Previously, she was news director for WXIA in Atlanta, Georgia. (Gannett) | Robert Christie is now vice president of international media for Alibaba Group. Previously, he was senior vice president of corporate communications for The New York Times Company. (Capital) | Kim Segal will be an attorney for Broward County. Previously, she was a supervising producer at CNN. (Romenesko) | Brian Balthazar will be co-executive producer at “The View.” He was head of programming at AOL. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: The AP is looking for a breaking news journalist in San Francisco. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Diane Sawyer

After Sawyer’s final ABC World News broadcast, all 3 nightly anchors are now white men

mediawiremorningYo. Here are some media stories.

  1. Is the Yo app ridiculous or revolutionary? That’s the question Cory Blair asks. It’s definitely the former, but it has potential to be the latter, especially now that users can send links and not just notifications with no content. Robert Hernandez has an interesting idea for what news organizations like The Washington Post could use Yo for: “whenever an unarmed person dies at the hands of the police, or every time somebody is killed with a gun.” (American Journalism Review)
  2. Diane Sawyer anchors her final ABC World News broadcast: But she’s staying with the network. David Muir is her successor. “Now, all three nightly news anchors are once again white men,” Brian Stelter notes. (CNN)
  3. NPR’s Michel Martin heads to Ferguson: The former “Tell Me More” host will lead a town hall meeting today. (Poynter) | Yesterday, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Lynden Steele and Gary Hairlson spoke with Poynter’s Kenny Irby in a live video chat. (Poynter) | Kristen Hare’s ever-fluctuating list of journalists in Ferguson is down to 109. It peaked at 148 last week. (Twitter) | Related: Twitter was widely celebrated for breaking news during the protests, but Nick Bilton writes that “while those live streams were seen as an unfiltered window into events as they unfolded, they often bore little resemblance to reality.” (The New York Times) | Related: The first Ferguson dispatch paid for by Huffington Post’s controversial crowdfunded fellowship. (Huffington Post) | Previously: HuffPost’s Ferguson Fellow Mariah Stewart: “This is huge for me.” (Poynter)
  4. Playboy.com goes SFW: The new site will have a “safe-for-work look and editorial focus,” Ricardo Bilton reports. “More classic nude fare can be found on Playboy Plus, Playboy’s digital subscription service.” Sixty percent of Playboy’s traffic is social. (Digiday)
  5. A Sopranos saga: Is Tony Soprano dead? Vox.com wrote that “David Chase finally answers the question he wants fans to stop asking” in a story Wednesday. (Vox.com) | Nilay Patel, editor-in-chief of The Verge (also a Vox Media site) was pissed that @SavedYouAClick tweeted the reveal of the story and “stole an experience” from readers. (The Verge) | And now Sopranos creator David Chase says the Vox.com story by Martha P. Nochimson misconstrued his remarks about the show’s finale. (NYT/ArtsBeat)
  6. Facebook’s ‘algorithmic censorship’: Here’s Alex Hern on the frightening power Facebook wields when it tweaks its News Feed algorithm: “The lack of transparency around this isn’t just worrying for media types: it should be concerning for everyone.” (The Guardian)
  7. NYT subscriptions still have room to grow: A Re/code story this week by Edmund Lee indicated New York Times digital-only subscriptions have plateaued; Ryan Chittum argues otherwise: “On a year-over-year basis, digital subs were up 19 percent in the second quarter and paywall revenue was up 13.5 percent. That’s hardly hitting a wall.” But he emphasizes growth in digital ad revenue will of course be crucial for medium- to long-term success. (Columbia Journalism Review)
  8. Who’s the most evasive press secretary of them all? BuzzFeed’s John Templon tracks the number of “weasel phrases” used by White House press secretaries in 5,000 press briefings since 1993. (BuzzFeed)
  9. Newspaper front page of the day: The Duluth (Minnesota) News Tribune, selected by Kristen Hare. (Newseum)
    MN_DNT
     
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Noah Chestnut will be the lead developer for BuzzFeed’s news app. He’s currently director of labs at The New Republic. (Capital) | Rob Mennie is now senior vice president of Gannett Broadcasting and general manager for WTLV/WJXX in Jacksonville, Florida. Previously, he was senior vice president of news for Gannett Broadcasting. (Gannett) | Ben Walsh will be a business reporter at The Huffington Post. He’s currently a writer for Reuters. (‏@BenDWalsh) | Kimberly Leonard will be a healthcare reporter for U.S. News and World Report. Previously, she was a health producer there. (@leonardkl) | Larry Abramson is now dean of the journalism school at the University of Montana. Previously, he was a correspondent for National Public Radio. Eric Whitney is now director of news for Montana Public Radio. Previously, he was a health reporter for National Public Radio. (The Missoulian) | Job of the day: KFSN in Fresno, California is looking for a news photojournalist and live truck operator. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Correction: The headline in this post originally misspelled Diane Sawyer’s last name. Read more

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Career Beat: Former assistant director of Pew journalism project buys newspaper

Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

  • John Batter will be CEO of Gracenote. Previously, he was CEO of M-GO. (Tech Crunch)
  • Mark Jurkowitz is the owner of the Outer Banks Sentinel in Nags Head, North Carolina. Previously, he was the associate director of Pew Research Center’s journalism project. (Romenesko)
  • Jon Ward is a senior political correspondent with Yahoo News. Previously, he was a political reporter for the Huffington Post. (Politico)
  • Shauna Rempel is now a social media strategist for Global News. Previously, she was social media and technology editor at the Toronto Star. (Muck Rack)
  • Chris Tisch is now business editor for the Tampa Bay Times. Previously, he was assistant metro editor there. (Tampa Bay Times)
  • Nathan Lump is now editor of Travel and Leisure. Previously, he was director of branded content at Condé Nast. (Time Inc.)

Job of the day: The San Antonio Express-News is looking for a web producer. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

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foley 2

The last email sent to Foley’s family

mediawiremorningGood morning. Your weekend is in sight. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. James Foley’s last months: Cassandra Vinograd tells how James Foley‘s family communicated with his captors. (NBC News) | “Some messages were political and some were financial.” (CNN) | The last email sent to his family (GlobalPost) | Shane Bauer: “Like my family, [Foley's family] probably sometimes thought they should do more to try and convince his captors to let him go. Other times they likely reasoned they should stay quiet, hoping that silence would give the hostage takers the opportunity to quietly release him. It’s a hideous position to be in.” (Mother Jones) | NYT editorial: “There is no simple answer on whether to submit to terrorist extortion.” (NYT) || Foley’s family establishes journalism scholarship at Marquette. (The Wire)
  2. More Fareed Zakaria plagiarism accusations coming: @crushingbort and @blippoblappo have another post coming, they tell Poynter. (It will post here.) Here’s a taste (bigger image here) of what they say is coming:

    Gerges-Al-Qaeda
     

  3. Ferguson has become a routine: “But now the nights follow a ragged, rule-bound routine that begins before dusk, when reporters check batteries, officers check weapons, and protesters prepare to repeat their calls for accountability.” (NYT) | “Down the hill on West Florissant, people gather throughout the night — journalists, police, protesters, people who seem to just want to watch all three.” (Poynter) | “Part of the reason Twitter has been so intertwined with the news coming out of Ferguson are the social media habits of blacks and journalists.” (Politico) | Al Jazeera America freelancer Ryan L. Schuessler finds the “behavior and number of journalists [in Ferguson] so appalling, that I cannot in good conscience continue to be a part of the spectacle.” (Ryan L. Schuessler) | “Schuessler won’t name” the journalists he claims to have seen behaving badly, J.K. Trotter writes. “But we will.” (Gawker)
  4. So why can’t HuffPost pay to keep a citizen journalist in Ferguson?? Plan to crowd-source funding for Mariah Stewart to keep reporting through Beacon drew boos from journalists who wondered why HuffPost couldn’t just pay her. (Jim Romenesko) | “Readers, won’t you make a donation today to support HuffPo’s nip-slip coverage?” (AdAge) | Mathew Ingram: “the choice isn’t between HuffPo hiring Stewart and using Beacon Reader to crowdfund a salary, it’s between crowdfunding her fellowship and not doing anything.” (Gigaom)
  5. Ferguson potpourri: The best and worst data journalism that’s come out of the coverage. (CJR) | An explainer on protest leaders (Riverfront Times) | Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan hits a story on Michael Brown‘s death: “The Times is asking readers to trust its sourcing, without nearly enough specificity or detail; and it sets up an apparently equal dichotomy between named eyewitnesses on one hand and ghosts on the other.” (NYT) | HuffPost’s Ferguson omnibus. (HuffPost) | Some of Kristen Hare‘s photos. (Poynter)
  6. Don Lemon is not having a good Ferguson: Interview with Talib Kweli goes very wrong. (Mediaite) | Discussion of weapons goes very wrong. (Gawker) | Related: “What journalists need to know about guns and gun control” (Poynter)
  7. How to sell Tumblr: The number of accounts should grow 25 percent this year. “Because many Tumblr users have multiple blogs, the number of blogs (currently 200 million) and daily posts (84.2 million) grows at a multiple to the number of users, giving the company a lot of new, mobile ad inventory — if only Yahoo can figure out a way to sell it.” (Forbes)
  8. A historic moment: Media reporter goes on vacation, and someone notices. (FishbowlDC)
  9. Oxford American plans Kickstarter campaign to fund music issue: Party Sept. 2 at South on Main in Little Rock. (Arkansas Times)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Edward Menicheschi is now president of Condé Nast Media Group. He was publisher of Vanity Fair. (Poynter) | Kim Heneghan is now vice president and general manager of money products for U.S. News and World Report. Previously, she was general manager of online at Hanley Wood, a real estate media firm. Kim Castro was named executive editor of consumer advice at U.S. News. Previously, she was managing editor for money and health there. (U.S. News) | Dan Mellon will be general manager of WJLA in Washington D.C. Previously, he was a group manager for Sinclair’s stations. Tony D’Angelo will be general manager of WSYX in Columbus, Ohio. (Sinclair Broadcast Group) | J.C. Lowe will be general manager of WEAR and WFGX in Pensacola, Florida. Previously, he was Sinclair’s general manager in Birmingham. (Sinclair Broadcast Group) | Deep Nishar, senior vice president of products and user experience at LinkedIn, is leaving the company. (LinkedIn) | Jessi Hempel is a senior writer at Wired. Previously, she was a writer for Fortune. (Jessi Hempel) | Job of the day: The National Journal is looking for an editor for its Next America project. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs). Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

A programming note: I will be on vacation Aug. 25-29. If you get this roundup by email, it will come to you from Sam Kirkland while I’m gone. Please email Sam (skirkland@poynter.org), Kristen Hare (khare@poynter.org) or Ben Mullin (bmullin@poynter.org) with tips and job moves while I’m gone. See you Sept. 2.

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James Foley

U.S. tried to rescue James Foley

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The U.S. tried to rescue James Foley, and it declined to pay ransom: Islamic State “pressed the United States to provide a multimillion-dollar ransom for his release,” Rukmini Callimachi reports. Unlike many European countries, the U.S. and Britain will not pay ransoms for hostages. The terror group holds other Americans, including Time freelancer Steven J. Sotloff. (NYT) | David Rohde: “The divergent U.S. and European approach to abductions fails to deter captors or consistently safeguard victims.” (Reuters) | Administration officials yesterday confirmed that U.S. Special Operations forces tried to rescue Foley, but the op “was not ultimately successful because the hostages were not present . . . at the site of the operation.” (WP) | Media blackouts “don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages,” James Harkin writes. “There are arguments for and against such blackouts, and there have been lively debates among the families of the missing about their strategic value, but in principle they seem inimical to the spirit of journalism—and potentially counterproductive.” (Vanity Fair) | “Many of those taken captive have been freelance journalists hoping to carve out careers by reporting where others had feared to tread,” Ravi Somaiya and Christine Haughney report. Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron “said that The Post now uses only contracted freelancers, so it can provide them the same equipment, security and communications technology that staff reporters get.” (NYT) | French journalist Nicolas Henin, who was held with Foley but released “said Foley had faced particular abuse from their jailers because he was American and his brother is in the US air force.” (AFP)
  2. How to handle the images of Foley’s death? Jack Shafer: “More likely, the videos, which our Western eyes tell us are staged for our benefit, are really aimed at the video-makers’ constituents to attract maximum attention, showcase the groups’ power, attract recruits, and build cadres – all things that the video may actually do.” (Reuters) | James Ball: “To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.” (The Guardian) | Mathew Ingram: “A number of people had their [Twitter] accounts suspended after they shared the images, including Zaid Benjamin of Radio Sawa, but media outlets that posted photos did not.” (Gigaom)
  3. The guns of Ferguson: Police officer suspended for aiming gun at protesters, telling them he’d kill them. (WP) | Watch the video of #OfficerGoFuckYourself (The Wire) | NPPA filed a formal complaint with three Missouri police forces, asking for a formal investigation into an incident where photojournalist Raffe Lazarian asked a policeman “which way do I need to go in order to get to the media area?” In reply, NPPA General Counsel Mickey H. Osterreicher writes, “the officer drew his weapon and pointed it at Mr. Lazarian in a threatening manner and then used it to gesture in the direction he wanted him to go.” (Scribd) | “In a life-and-death situation, like when armed rioters are firing at police from the apartments behind the emblematic, burned-out QuikTrip in Ferguson, how can police tell once and for all who is a journalist and who isn’t?” (Riverfront Times) || MUSICIANS GET INVOLVED: Nelly spoke with Eric Holder. (NBC News) | Killer Mike and Talib Kweli talked about Ferguson on TV. (BuzzFeed) || Bloomberg Businessweek cover: “Race, Class, and The Future of Ferguson.” (@BW) | Time cover: “The Tragedy of Ferguson” (@neetzan)
  4. Poynter’s Kristen Hare is in Ferguson again today: She filed vignettes yesterday (longer piece TK) on the Post-Dispatch’s morning meeting, St. Louis Public Radio, Boston Globe reporter Akilah Johnson and local videojournalist John Miller. | Follow her on Twitter, and you’ll see plenty of pics of her turning the camera around on the media, like this photo of Wesley Lowery, Ryan Reilly and Alex Altman working in the Ferguson McDonald’s.
  5. Huffington Post will keep covering Ferguson after the circus leaves town: “With reader support, we’ll hire a local citizen journalist who’s been covering the turmoil and train her to become a professional journalist,” Ryan Grim writes. (HuffPost)
  6. How cable news covered Ferguson: “MSNBC devoted far more time to the story than its top competitors Fox News and CNN. … Our previous analysis of the 2012 killing of Trayvon Martin, another news story with strong racial undertones involving the shooting death of a black teen in Florida, found similar treatment by the three cable channels.” (Pew)
  7. Gatehouse parent company’s stock rises: Rise follows a Seeking Alpha post by VJ Shil that “rattled off a bunch of promising attributes: a nice dividend, an appealing acquisition pipeline, strong loyalty to local newspapers among small-town residents, the shedding of GateHouse’s massive mountain of debt through a recent bankruptcy.” (Boston Business Journal)
  8. Could Vox’s Chorus become a platform? Lockhart Steele: “perhaps Chorus should become a tool for more than just those of us employed at Vox Media, and a platform that transcends words in the ways that Vox Media has long since transcended just being a collection of websites? | FREEKY FLASHBACK: A pre-post-text Felix Salmon sang Chorus’ praises last year. (Reuters) | “Platisher”-coiner Jonathan Glick: “Not going to say it.” (@jonathanglick)
  9. Chicago Tribune cartoonist “doesn’t mind confounding readers”: “When a cartoonist chooses sides ‘you’re not engaging anyone,” Joe Fournier tells Michael Miner. “You’re just appeasing the side you’re committed to. It confuses the hell out of people when I don’t choose a side.” (Chicago Reader)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Cassie Heiter is a meteorologist at KWTV in Oklahoma City. Previously, she was a meteorologist at WQAD in Moline, Illinois. (Lacey Swope) | Matt Brickman and Kim Johnson will join WCCO 4 News This Morning in Minneapolis. Brickman currently gives weather forecasts on Saturday mornings. Johnson is currently an anchor on Saturday mornings. (CBS Minnesota) | Dan Wilson will be news director for WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida. Previously, he was interim news director there. (FTV Live) | Shellene Cockrell is now a morning anchor for KOAA in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Previously, she was a reporter for KWGN in Denver. (Colorado Springs Gazette) | Craig Melvin will be a national correspondent for the “Today Show”. Previously, he had been anchoring for MSNBC on the weekends. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: The Hill is looking for technology and cyber security reporters. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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BuzzFeed and Facebook Host Bowties & Burgers During 2014 White House Correspondents' Association Dinner

Commenters hate HuffPost’s new Facebook-only commenting system

The Huffington Post

The Huffington Post’s U.S. site and mobile apps will shift to using only Facebook comments starting Monday at noon, HuffPost CTO Otto Toth announced.

“This is far from an an end to conversation; it’s the start of conversation where you want to have it — and where you’ve been having it already,” he wrote.

Readers are having a Facebook conversation under Toth’s post, but many of them claim it’s the last one they’ll have before abandoning the site. The most-liked comment: “Now deleting my account, which I’ve used since 2011. If I wanted this integrated with Facebook, that’s how I would have logged in. Thanks for the memories.” Read more

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