Articles about "Huffington Post"


SABEW, Selden Ring, SND winners announced as awards season heats up

Every spring the tempo of journalism awards increases until the Pulitzer Prizes are announced. This year, that Twitter-crushing event will take place on April 15.

• The Society of American Business Editors and Writers announced its awards Monday (here’s the full list). Bloomberg’s properties won 14 awards, including a breaking news award for Bloomberg News’ coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Affordable Care Act decision (Bloomberg terminal users got the news 24 seconds before AP pushed it out). The New York Times won nine awards, including one for its “iEconomy” series. And The Huffington Post and CNBC had five awards each; Peter Goodman’s coverage of poverty in HuffPost was among the work honored.

• Alexandra Zayas of the Tampa Bay Times won the 2013 Selden Ring Award for her series investigating children’s homes in Florida.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Lawsuit over HuffPost’s origins will proceed, but CEO Armstrong won’t be questioned

Paid Content | Beet.TV

Like The Huffington Post’s annual What Time Is the Super Bowl? page, Peter Daou and James Boyce’s suit asserting they’d helped start the site just won’t die.

New York Supreme Court Judge Charles Ramos Wednesday ordered Arianna Huffington, Ken Lerer and the Huffington Post to answer the Democratic consultants’ complaint, which charges that they’d written documents that became the framework for the site.

Ramos also quashed a subpoena Doau and Boyce’s lawyers hoped to issue to AOL CEO Tim Armstrong. Armstrong engineered AOL’s purchase of The Huffington Post in February 2011 but was not an original founder of the site. The plaintiffs “have not demonstrated that Armstrong had any information other than that of his company, AOL, regarding the reasons for purchasing the Huffington Post,” Ramos wrote.… Read more

Tools:
0 Comments

Why publishers should follow the Verge-HuffPost aggregation dustup

Techdirt | BuzzFeed

It might be hard to understand why staffers at tech site The Verge complained so loudly about a Huffington Post “linkout” that sent readers to a Verge feature. After all, isn’t the Web built on such selfless acts of curation?

I’m sort of at a loss as to how anyone might think that the HuffPo snippet and link takes away from the original,” Techdirt Editor Mike Masnick wrote Wednesday.

Also on Wednesday, Huffington Post Senior News Editor Whitney Snyder roared to the defense of his organization’s linking practices.… Read more

Tools:
1 Comment

Trymaine Lee: New MSNBC gig is a chance to ‘flex different muscles’

Maynard Institute
Trymaine Lee, the Huffington Post reporter who helped move the Trayvon Martin story into the mainstream, is taking a job at MSNBC.

Reached by phone, Lee told Poynter he was taking most of November off to spend time with his daughter, who was born in August. His exact role at MSNBC “will be tightened” after he gets there, he said, but he expects to focus on what he said were “issues that are important to progressives,” such as gun rights and gun control.

As a police reporter at the New Orleans Times-Picayune, Lee was part of a team that won a Pulitzer Prize for its Hurricane Katrina coverage. He also contributed reporting to The New York Times’ Pultizer Prize-winning coverage of Gov. Eliot Spitzer’s downfall, Richard Prince writes.… Read more

Tools:
2 Comments
natesilver

What Nate Silver’s success says about the 4th and 5th estates

Many are declaring the 2012 presidential election a victory for Nate Silver and his FiveThirtyEight blog. His success this political season — in both predicting the electoral college vote and in driving traffic to the New York Times — is a validation for the independent Fifth Estate, as well as the reassertion of journalism as a discipline of verification.

It might seem a bit heretical to link those two ideas — the rise of independent voices and the rebirth of verification — in the same sentence. After all, the spread of unfettered opinion seemed to coincide with an escalation in the amount of suspect information populating the marketplace of ideas. But they are, in fact, related.

Silver’s rise fits neatly with the other big trend of this election: fact checking.… Read more

Tools:
11 Comments
A6a2UGgCUAEicSV

Huffington Post, Gawker websites go down as newsrooms lose servers, power

The Huffington Post website is down Tuesday morning, along with all the Gawker sites. BuzzFeed was up and down Monday evening, as teams shifted publishing to social platforms including Twitter, Tumblr and Facebook. While most major news websites in New Jersey and New York continued to publish as planned, others did not fare as well once water began pouring in and pockets of the city lost power due to Sandy.

Huffington Post Communications Director Rhoades Alderson explains what happened:

Our primary datacenter (Datagram) is in New York City and the backup is in Newark. Those host the fronted web servers, while the comments, statistics, analytics, and data are all hosted elsewhere in places unaffected by the storm. …

Read more
Tools:
1 Comment

Huffington Post leads news sites with the most viral stories on Facebook

BuzzFeed
Matt Buchanan publishes a list of the news websites that have the most stories that go viral on Facebook (getting at least 100 “interactions”). It’s based on all Facebook sharing activity in September, as tracked by Newswhip.

It’s probably no coincidence that the top three websites — Huffington Post, Daily Mail, and Yahoo — use “frictionless sharing” apps to automatically share some users’ article-reading activity with their Facebook friends. While the apps push the boundaries of reader privacy, they also effectively spread stories.

Following them are some legacy media websites: BBC, The New York Times and The Guardian.

A few of the 40 most-shared news websites on Facebook.

Earlier: Huffington Post dominates Facebook’s most-shared politics stories last year | With ‘frictionless sharing,’ Facebook and news orgs push boundaries of online privacyRead more

Tools:
1 Comment
moderator

How the Huffington Post handles 70+ million comments a year

The Huffington Post has accumulated more than 70 million comments so far this year, far surpassing the 2011 total of 54 million.

To take a single example, its post (the first published) with the now-famous video of Mitt Romney’s “47 percent” comments attracted a mind-blowing 171,753 comments.

All news sites struggle with user comments in some way or another, but moderating this enormous volume of messages is a unique test of whether online conversations as we know them — a dozen people making a few points on a blog post or article — can scale infinitely larger without collapsing into cacophony.

User comments on Huffington Post articles have surged over the years, to about 8 million in July and 9 million (not pictured) in August.
Read more
Tools:
5 Comments

Huffington Post, Newsweek use coat-hanger imagery for GOP platform

On Tuesday the Republican Party approved a plank to its convention platform opposing abortion in all cases.

The Huffington Post responded with an arresting homepage image:

As Erik Wemple reported first, HuffPost front-page editor Whitney Snyder and senior editor Danny Shea conceived the idea, which Arianna Huffington “loved.” Reached by phone, founding editor Roy Sekoff said the image “went right up to the line of offensive” and reminded him of George Lois’ classic Esquire covers and that he wants the site’s “tops” to have “the same power.” … Read more

Tools:
2 Comments

Huffington iPad mag stops charging, renewing concern about readers’ willingness to pay

Capital New York | GigaOM
The Huffington Post’s new weekly iPad magazine — originally priced at 99 cents / $1.99 a month / $19.99 a year — is dropping its price to zero after five issues, Joe Pompeo reports. AOL claims about 115,000 downloads of the app, Pompeo writes, but it wasn’t clear how many of those ever paid for an issue (the first month came free).

The moves comes shortly after The Daily, News Corp.’s iPad-only newsmagazine, laid off 50 staffers and scaled back content.

Mathew Ingram’s analysis is that single-source apps “don’t fit the way content works anymore”:

Whether media companies like it or not (and they mostly don’t), much of the news and other content we consume now comes via links shared through Twitter and Facebook and other networks, or through old-fashioned aggregators — such as Yahoo News or Google News — and newer ones like Flipboard and Zite and Prismatic that are tailored to mobile devices and a socially-driven news experience.

Read more
Tools:
0 Comments