Articles about "Indiana University"


Jeff Bezos

Newspaper distributor to do same-day delivery for Amazon

mediawiremorningIt’s Thursday. Here’s a pop quiz: How many media stories do you think you’re about to get?

  1. UK newspaper distributor will do same-day Amazon deliveries: “Connect Group will make early morning deliveries at the same time as it delivers daily newspapers and use contractors to fulfill a second delivery in the afternoon.” Connect distributes The Guardian and The Mirror, Rory Gallivan reports. (Wall Street Journal)
  2. Longtime S.F. Chronicle editor William German dies at 95: “Mr. German began his career at the paper as a copy boy. When he retired 62 years later, he was the dean of West Coast editors. He had helped transform The Chronicle from the No.3 newspaper in a four-newspaper city to the largest paper in Northern California.” (San Francisco Chronicle)
  3. BBC battles Ebola in Africa with WhatsApp: “The service will deliver information on preventative care, health tips and breaking news bulletins specific to the region about the virus in French and English, and often in audio formats,” writes Alastair Reid.
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Ernie Pyle sculpture will be unveiled at Indiana University this fall

Indiana University

Ernie Pyle’s name isn’t on the journalism school at Indiana University as some have demanded, and the journalism school is moving from Ernie Pyle Hall, but in October, his sculpture will be out front of what will become the home of The Media School. On Friday, Indiana University’s school of journalism reported that the statue of Pyle will be unveiled at homecoming this fall.

IU President Michael McRobbie is scheduled to lead the unveiling and dedication of the sculpture Friday, Oct. 17. The sculpture will be located near the Sample Gates and Franklin Hall, future home of The Media School.

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Indiana University survey: journalists grow more negative about their work

Indiana University

U.S. journalists are more dissatisfied with their work, feel less autonomy in choosing their stories and are more likely to think the industry is headed in the wrong direction compared to a decade ago, according to the latest in a series of studies tapping into the zeitgeist of American newsrooms.

In a survey of 1,080 journalists last fall, Indiana University researchers found not surprisingly that 59.7 percent of those surveyed see journalism going in the wrong direction. Read more

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