Articles about "International media"


USA vs. CHN Curling

Sochi photo coverage takes ‘patience, planning, logistics’

Harry Walker, photo director at McClatchy-Tribune Information Services, has a unique vantage point overseeing MCT’s visual coverage of the Olympic Games.

Raised in Savannah, Ga., Walker graduated from Morehouse College in 1980. He started his photojournalism career at The Columbus … Read more

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China Citizens Movement Trial

Covering China: for foreign and domestic press, self-censorship’s the threat

A plainclothes policeman, center, tries to block a foreign journalist filming while police detain the supporters of Xu Zhiyong near the No. 1 Intermediate People’s Court in Beijing Wednesday. Xu, a legal scholar and founder of the New Citizens movement,
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Another journalist killed in Indian state

The Hindu | Times of India Local protests in India this week follow the killing last Friday of India journalist Sai Reddy in the Bijapur district in south Chhattisgarh, The Hindu reported. The 51-year-old journalist was attacked at a weekly market. Maoists are suspected in the killing, although none have taken responsibility, the newspaper said. (more...)
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chinamedia

Why censorship looks like ‘harmony’ inside Chinese media

The first time I got in trouble at China Radio International was for saying it’s OK to drive over the speed limit as long as that’s  the speed of traffic.

I was hosting a show called “China Now,” which aired … Read more

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In this photo taken and released by a protester, a local university student, left, a supporter of the Southern Weekly, is interviewed by a foreign media before being taken away by plainclothes policemen outside the newspaper headquarters in Guangzhou, Guangdong province, China Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013. Police attempted Thursday to prevent more of protests outside the compound housing the Southern Weekly and its parent company, the Nanfang Media Group, in Guangzhou, a city long at the forefront of reforms. About 30 police officers guarded the area and ordered reporters and any loiterers to move away, saying there had been complaints about obstructing traffic. The influential weekly newspaper whose staff rebelled to protest heavy-handed censorship by China's government officials published as normal Thursday after a compromise that called for relaxing some intrusive controls but left lingering ill-will among some reporters and editors. (AP Photo)

What China press censorship protests say about digital shift and democracy

It is telling that the protests in China this week over government control involve a newspaper and censorship — not a military tank in a public square.

China has walked the fragile road of modernism and capitalism without democracy. But … Read more

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4 media shifts to watch for in China

I was honored to represent the U.S., the Poynter Institute and KING Broadcasting Co. at the Colloquium on Future Global Communication and Journalism Education held Dec. 15-16 at Tsinghua University in Beijing. The first session featured five international speakers — … Read more

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washposthongkong

Journalism students from Hong Kong view profession differently after U.S. visit

For two weeks I played host to six college students, all journalism majors, as we flew from Hong Kong to Washington, D.C., to cover the U.S. Presidential Elections. I packed the agenda with numerous newsroom visits to show … Read more

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On World Press Freedom Day, Equatorial Guinea lives up to its low ranking

Committee to Protect Journalists
The government of Equatorial Guinea responded to its distinction as the fifth most-censored country in the world by holding a news conference at which President Teodoro Obiang declared, "There are really no restrictions on any activity of the press, provided they are legal." That message must not have made it to the head of the state-owned broadcaster, who on the same day "barred Samuel Obiang Mbana, an independent journalist ... from participating in a televised debate to which he had been invited two days earlier to speak on how press freedom could transform the country." Mbana tells CPJ's Peter Nkanga, "I was told I am problematic, that I might say something the station is censored not to say, and which the government doesn't want aired." || Related: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton honors journalists on World Press Freedom Day (U.S. Department of State)
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