Articles about "International reporting"


Kristof: ‘The U.S. is losing interest’ in foreign reporting

Reddit
New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof answered readers' questions on Reddit Monday. Here are some highlights:

• Kristof tries to produce as much copy as he can from his trips abroad: "[G]iven how long it takes to get to the places I go, I need to be sure that if I get there, I can do several different columns from that destination." And he thinks the appetite for foreign reporting is waning:

The big challenge for foreign reporting is that I think the U.S. is losing interest. For a decade or so after 9/11, the U.S. was quite interested in the world, an aberration in our history of insularity. Now I think we're reverting the more normal situation where we're quite inward looking. That also poses huge problems for those of us who care about global poverty.
• He admits he likes making the "most emailed" list. (Here are some tips for doing that.) (more...)
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coptic

What journalists need to know about Coptic Christians

This morning I got a call from the Poynter.org editors, who asked: “Could you write a piece explaining Coptic Christianity?” The request comes as law enforcement identifies Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, being widely described as a “California Coptic Christian,” as the … Read more

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health

NPR’s new global health beat blends social media, traditional reporting

As news organizations experiment more with social networking sites, many are realizing that social media has to be an integral part of how we gather news, tell stories and develop beats.

NPR’s new global health and development beat is a … Read more

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On World Press Freedom Day, Equatorial Guinea lives up to its low ranking

Committee to Protect Journalists
The government of Equatorial Guinea responded to its distinction as the fifth most-censored country in the world by holding a news conference at which President Teodoro Obiang declared, "There are really no restrictions on any activity of the press, provided they are legal." That message must not have made it to the head of the state-owned broadcaster, who on the same day "barred Samuel Obiang Mbana, an independent journalist ... from participating in a televised debate to which he had been invited two days earlier to speak on how press freedom could transform the country." Mbana tells CPJ's Peter Nkanga, "I was told I am problematic, that I might say something the station is censored not to say, and which the government doesn't want aired." || Related: Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton honors journalists on World Press Freedom Day (U.S. Department of State)
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afghanistan

How journalists train to stay safe while covering hostile environments

Before he ever stepped foot in Iraq, Washington Post reporter Ed O’Keefe had already navigated his way through landmines, used a tourniquet to help an injured person, and been ambushed.

He did all this and more in a hostile environment … Read more

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Corporation for Public Broadcasting gives NPR $500,000 for foreign news coverage

The money, announced last night as NPR journalist Lourdes Garcia-Navarro was honored with an Edward R. Murrow award, "will help support journalists and producers stationed across five key NPR foreign bureaus - Jerusalem, Cairo, Beirut, Shanghai and Beijing," says a CPB press release. "The funding will enable these journalists to continue reporting feature stories for broadcast, web and mobile platforms." (The full release is after the jump.) || Related: NPR's Andy Carvin won in the "#Journalist" category of Monday night's Shorty Awards (more...)
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CNN reporter on covering modern-day slavery in Mauritania: ‘We had to do much of this reporting in secret’

CNN’s John Sutter and Edythe McNamee spent nearly a year trying to gain entry into Mauritania, where 10 to 20 percent of the population is still enslaved. Their project, “Slavery’s Last Stronghold,” shows the effects slavery has had … Read more

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How CNN’s reporting on modern-day slavery fits into its efforts to strengthen international coverage

Before he set out to cover modern-day slavery in Mauritania, CNN’s John Sutter thought he’d be able to distance himself emotionally from the story. But after hearing accounts from former slaves and slave owners, he couldn’t help but be … Read more

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Watch a CNN crew hike out of Syria

CNN
Ivan Watson narrates as he and a crew of CNN journalists clamber across rocks as they leave Syria. "I’ve had some tough assignments," says CNN photographer Joe Duran. "I’d say this is the most difficult one for many reasons. … It’s been not just scary, but emotional. Some of the people we left behind, I just hate to think what might happen to them." Also on CNN: A gripping, long report by a French photographer the network is calling Mani, showing Homs at war. One little girl holds up a photo of her Uncle Salah. "He was filming the demonstrations," she replies, when asked how he died. || Related: Poland's diplomats try to get two wounded journalists out of Homs, along with bodies of Remi Ochlik and Marie Colvin (Associated Press) | Activists, including citizen journalists, in Homs "are prepared to die in the battle for a free and democratic Syria." (Channel 4 News)
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How Anthony Shadid and Marie Colvin got their stories

“Even in brief conversations, these two journalists forcefully drove home their message: The human condition was a sacred beat. When Shadid drove into an Iraqi village, he went straight to the barber shop or the local mosque. ‘You can find out everything there if they trust you,’ he said. Colvin traveled with Chechen rebels, sleeping in caves with bags of grenades for a pillow. ‘You eat what they eat, you drink what they drink, you never act like you are above them,’ she said.”

Earlier: Injured journalists in Syria plead for help; David Carr and Timothy Phelps on war reporting

Correction: An earlier version of this post misidentified Timothy Phelps.

Sherry Ricchiardi, American Journalism Review

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