Articles about "James Foley"


Jian Ghomeshi

Toronto Star investigated sex allegations against Jian Ghomeshi

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Jian Ghomeshi leaves CBC under dramatic circumstances: The broadcaster fired the host, whose show “Q” has gained a foothold below the 49th parallel as well, citing “information” it had received about him. (CBC) | “Over the past few months the Star has approached Ghomeshi with allegations from three young women, all about 20 years his junior, who say he was physically violent to them without their consent during sexual encounters or in the lead-up to sexual encounters.” (Toronto Star) | Ghomeshi acknowledges his “tastes in the bedroom may not be palatable to some folks” and says an ex-girlfriend launched a “campaign of harassment, vengeance and demonization against me” and that one person “began colluding with a freelance writer who was known not to be a fan of mine and, together, they set out to try to find corroborators to build a case to defame me.” (Jian Ghomeshi’s Facebook) | Canadaland’s Jesse Brown says he’s been working with the Toronto Star investigating Ghomeshi. “I don’t have any interest in celebrity gossip … this was something serious, something that I felt very strongly needed to be reported. .. This whole thing has a ways to go.” (Canadaland) | Carla Ciccone “was harassed and ridiculed by Ghomeshi fans after she published a thinly disguised account of a sexual encounter with the host on XO Jane last summer.” (Gawker)
  2. Why publishers are scared of Facebook: The company wants to help publishers crack mobile, maybe even host publishers’ pages and split ad revenue, David Carr writes. The big question: “Is the coming contest between platforms and publishing companies an existential threat to journalism?” Atlantic Media owner David Bradley tells Carr. (NYT) | Sam Kirkland wrote earlier this month about how Facebook news partnerships head Liz Heron “answered for a litany of perceived sins and slights” at ONA. (Poynter) | Ravi Somaiya: “Numerous publications, including The New York Times, have met with Facebook officials to discuss how to improve their referral traffic.” (NYT)
  3. Philly papers won’t make endorsement in governor’s race: Owner Gerry Lenfest writes, “Instead of an endorsement for governor, I asked the editorial boards of both The Inquirer and the Daily News to provide a summary of where the candidates stand on the critical issues facing the state, as well as the positions each paper has taken on those issues, and then let the voters decide who they think is most qualified.” (Philly.com) | Joel Mathis: “Through all the battles … of recent years, the Inquirer and its journalists have persistently strived to maintain a reputation as a strong, independent voice in the city. Sunday’s non-endorsement undermines that effort. Sometimes it’s better to take a stand.” (Philadelphia) | Lenfest is among the top donors to Gov. Tom Corbett, who is running for reelection. (AP) | Related: The Boston Globe endorsed — gasp — a Republican in the Massachusetts gubernatorial race. (The Boston Globe) | Dan Kennedy collects the times the newspaper has endorsed Republicans. (Media Nation)
  4. Reddit’s racism problem: “A persistent, organized and particularly hateful strain of racism has emerged on the site,” Jason Abbruzzese writes. “Enabled by Reddit’s system and permitted thanks to its fervent stance against any censorship, it has proven capable of overwhelming the site’s volunteer moderators and rendering entire subreddits unusable.” (Mashable)
  5. Obama doesn’t watch cable news: “I have spent, you know, countless hours with him on Air Force One, especially, in the conference room where we always had the TV on, and it was never in any of the trips I ever took with him, tuned in to cable news,” Jay Carney tells Brian Stelter. (TVNewser)
  6. Chicago mural honors James Foley: A group of his friends “wanted the mural to be near Cafe Jumping Bean, the 18th Street coffee shop where Foley spent time writing and working,” Stephanie Lulay reports. (DNAinfo) | The horrors he and others experienced during their capitivity. (NYT)
  7. News orgs want access to Sayreville hearings: “The media organizations argue that allowing the public access to the case will provide an outlet ‘for community concern’ in the highly charged case. (AP)
  8. Headline of the day: “World Series National Anthem Botched By That Asshole From Staind” (Deadspin)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Canada’s National Post fronts the Ghomeshi mess with a very good headline: “World War Q.” (Courtesy Newseum)

    nationalpost-10272014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sam Biddle will be a senior writer at Gawker. Previously, he was co-editor of Valleywag. Nitasha Tiku, the publication’s other top editor, “will be taking over Biddle’s responsibilities.” (Business Insider) | Polina Marinova is now associate editor of audience engagement at Fortune. Previously, she was social media editor at OZY Media. (@polina_marinova) | Karen Leigh is now deputy Middle East bureau chief at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was managing editor of Syria Deeply. (@raju) | Rachel Orr will be a mobile designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a page designer at Express. (The Washington Post) | Stephen Bohner is now a mobile producer at The Washington Post. Previously, he was an online producer for The Arizona Republic (The Washington Post) | Kyle Brinkman has been named news director for KLFY in Lafayette, Louisiana. Previously, he was news director for WEAR in Pensacola, Florida. Andrea Clenney will be news director for WLTZ in Columbus, Georgia. Previously, she was news director for WCJB in Gainesville, Florida. Jennifer Rigby is vice president of special projects for The Weather Channel. Previously, she was vice president of live programming there. Leesa Dillon is now senior executive producer at WGCL in Atlanta. Previously, she was senior executive producer at KCTV in Kansas City. (Rick Geevers) | The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette is looking for an online news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Zakaria plagiarized in TV show, critics say: Mysterious media critics @blippoblappo and @crushingbort tell Poynter they will have another post on Our Bad Media later this morning outlining what they say are examples of Fareed Zakaria lifting text, this time for his CNN show, “GPS.” Here’s a video that will accompany the piece.

    @blippoblappo and @crushingbort’s last post, in August, outlined suspect passages in Zakaria’s 2008 book, “The Post-American World” and in stories in Newsweek and Foreign Affairs. Neither W.W. Norton, which published the book, Newsweek, Foreign Affairs nor Atlantic Media, where Zakaria is now a contributing editor, replied to Poynter’s requests for comment.

  2. Foley family describes frustrations with U.S. government: The FBI first told James Foley‘s family they’d be prosecuted if they paid ransom to his captors, then advised them prosecution would be unlikely, Rukmini Callimachi reports. “Once the family made it clear they wanted to pay, the bureau instructed them to stall, according to a consultant working on the hostage crisis.” (NYT) | “A policy against paying ransoms makes sense — but making the family of a captured journalist feel like criminals does not.” (Vox) | “It was very upsetting because we were essentially told to trust… that the way they were handling things would bring our son home,” Foley’s mother, Diane Foley, said last week. (ABC News) | The family’s new fund “will push for the discussion, development and coordination of policies that are consistent, transparent, and accountable to all American citizens held captive world-wide.” (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  3. RCFP hires a litigation director: Katie Townsend will help the organization sue those who impede newsgathering. (CJR) | “The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (BIJ) filed an application on Friday with the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg challenging current UK legislation on mass surveillance and its threat to journalism.” (Index on Censorship)
  4. Free cops for Fox News honcho: “According to police records obtained by Gawker, the Cresskill [New Jersey] Police Department supplies 24/7 security to [Roger] Ailes’ residence there—apparently at no cost to Ailes himself—and otherwise delivers on-demand police services to his family, regardless of whether or not they are in any obvious danger.” (Gawker)
  5. Julian Assange did a chat on Gawker: “Opinion polling from the US just two months ago shows that WikiLeaks has majority support of people under the age of 40,” Assange told PootMcFruitcakes in the chat. (Gawker) | “Pale nerd king,” “seed-spilling sex creep,” “Real-life The Matrix extra”: Abby Ohlheiser on Gawker’s history of describing Assange. (WP)
  6. What newspapers can do: They have to offer “engaging and worthwhile material,” Rem Rieder writes, conveying API chief’s Tom Rosenstiel‘s speech at the ASNE convention Monday. “They certainly are not going to out BuzzFeed BuzzFeed at the clickbait game.” (USA Today) | Alexander Nazaryan: Journalism might not be saved, but “it isn’t quite as doomed as we thought several years ago.” (Newsweek)
  7. Let’s talk about native ads: California Sunday Magazine, which plans a launch next month, will feature “story advertising” — “We are doing one series of story advertising with Nest that feels like a gallery exhibit with prominent illustrators and artists and what home means to them,” Chas Edwards tells Kara Swisher. “But we are also making sure we are very transparent.” (Re/code) | Josh Benton: “Why is native advertising so appealing to publishers? Let’s start with the obvious: money. You may have heard that a lot of news companies are in need of it.” (Nieman) | The New York Times Monday published the second of four planned native ads on Mashable. The first was called “11 Inspiring Videos That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity.” (Poynter)
  8. No comment from the bespokesperson?: The New York Times used the word bespoke “more than any other US publication in the past three months, according to a Nexis search, with “bespoke” appearing nearly three dozen times, excluding in proper names.” (CJR)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: The Buenos Aires Herald fronts a photo of a man who signals his support of Scottish independence with a complicated hairstyle. (Courtesy the Newseum)

    bah-09162014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ryan Nobles is now a national correspondent for CNN. Previously, he was an anchor and reporter for WWBT in Richmond, Virginia. (CNN) | Preetma Singh has been named market director for Nylon. Formerly, she was market editor at WSJ Magazine. She’s also the drummer for Vomitface. (Email) | Danielle Jones has been named executive vice president for expansion at Politico. Previously, she was deputy editor-in-chief there. Miki King has been named executive vice president for operations at Politico. Previously, she was senior vice president of business development there. (Politico) | Carol Morello will be a diplomatic correspondent at The Washington Post. She covers the census and demographics there. (The Washington Post) | Theodore Kim is now a homepage editor at The New York Times. Previously, he was a mobile and tablet editor at The Washington Post. (Sched) | Marin Cogan will be a contributing editor at New York Magazine. She’s a writer-at-large for the National Journal. (Politico) | Tim Evans will be a consumer advocate for The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a court reporter there. (@starwatchtim) | Les Zaitz has been named investigations editor at The Oregonian. He is a senior investigative reporter there. (Email) | Job of the day: The San Jose Mercury News is looking for a Silicon Valley reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

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foley-2

James Foley family’s new fund will ‘honor what he stood for’

mediawiremorningGood morning. We’re nearly there. Here are 10 media stories, plus a fact that made me sigh and quietly review my life choices: The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Ready to Die” came out 20 years ago Saturday.

  1. Foley, Tice parents speak: “I really feel that our country let Jim down,” James Foley‘s mother Diane Foley tells Anderson Cooper. She says her son “was sacrificed because of just a lack of coordination, lack of communication, lack of prioritization.” (CNN) | Earlier this week, Austin Tice‘s parents told Clarissa Ward, “If an American citizen is held hostage overseas, you are discouraged and disparaged if you even consider paying a reward for a precious human child, because you don’t know where that reward money’s gonna go. …You know, we’re just a mom and dad. We just want our child back, and we wanna do whatever it takes.” (CBS News) | A message from the Foley family Twitter account: “please follow our new Twitter account @JamesFoleyFund.” (@freejamesfoley) | The fund will “honor what he stood for,” the family writes, with plans to build “a resource center for families of American hostages and [foster] a global dialog on governmental policies in hostage crises,” among other goals. (James W. Foley Legacy Fund)
  2. Networks say they won’t show Rice video anymore: ESPN made that call Tuesday morning, David Bauder reports. “It was obviously quite disturbing and we felt the audience had seen it enough,” ESPN spox Josh Krulewitz said. (AP) | Meredith Clark: “Using the video without consent violates our ethical obligation to treat Janay Rice and other survivors of intimate partner violence as people rather than vehicles for social change.” (Poynter) | Related: How “did Goodell pick the Rice case to appear insufficiently authoritarian?” Jack Shafer asks. (Reuters)
  3. What a watch-based media landscape may look like: “The Apple Watch also makes a solid case for a more algorithmically curated, condensed Twitter timeline,” Dan Frommer writes. “One thing we noticed is the text in Twitter’s app that describes your Timeline: ‘New and interesting.’” (Quartz) | “We are about to enter the era of ‘glance journalism.’” (Nieman) | Yahoo News Digest already works on Apple Watch, and Circa is looking into it. (BuzzFeed) | Very related: Research from Irene Costera Meijer and Tim Groot Kormelink looks into news consumption, including “Checking and scanning vs snacking and monitoring.” (Online Journalism Blog)
  4. Speaking of Yahoo News Digest: Its new iPad app hit the App Store last night. (Yahoo’s Tumblr) | Nick D’Aloisio, who heads the Yahoo News Digest team, tells Leo Kelion he is “weighing up university and Yahoo” for next year. (He’s 18.) (BBC News)
  5. Attn: NYC tourism folks: Humans of New York blogger Brandon Stanton: “Out of all the countries that I’ve been to, Ukraine reminded me the most of home.” (Kyiv Post)
  6. You know how we keep talking about the revenue potential of video ads? Almost 20 percent of that market belongs to YouTube, but that may be as high as it gets. (WSJ)
  7. Intern apologizes: Mallory Musallam wrote a letter to former internship host David Letterman saying she’d withdrawn from a class action suit and had been “approached by a beguiling legion of lawsuit-hungry attorneys.” (NYDN)
  8. Vook has bought the ashes of Byliner: “The deal may be good news for Byliner authors who wondered how they were going to get paid,” Laura Hazard Owen reports. “Vook said Thursday that it would be paying them 85 percent royalties on works that were already for sale at digital retailers like Amazon and Apple.” (Gigaom)
  9. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare: A moving photo on The New York Times. (Courtesy the Newseum.)

    nyt_09122014 

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Kate Lanphear is now editor-in-chief of Maxim. Previously, she was style editor at T Magazine. (WWD) | Kerry Diamond is now editor-in-chief of Yahoo Food. She is the co-founder and editorial director of Cherry Bombe. Kristen Baldwin is editor-in-chief of Yahoo TV. Previously, she was deputy editor at Entertainment Weekly. (Email) | Alice Gabriner will be international photo editor for Time magazine. She was a senior photo editor at National Geographic. Mandy Oaklander will be a staff writer for Time magazine. Previously, she was a senior writer for Prevention.com. Jack Linshi is a breaking news reporter and homepage editor at Time magazine. He was a weekend arts and living editor at the Yale Daily News. Lily Rothman will be an archive editor at Time magazine. Previously, she was a reporter there. Reno Ong will be an audience engagement editor at Time magazine. Previously she was a copy editor there. (Fishbowl DC) | Emma Fitzsimmons is a transit reporter for The New York Times. Previously, she was a reporter there. (NYT Metro desk) | Pamela Henson is now president and publisher of the Appleton (Wisconsin) Post-Crescent. She was senior vice president of advertising, marketing and digital sales at the Milwaukee (Wisconsin) Journal-Sentinel. (Gannett) | Tim Tebow is now a contributor at “Good Morning America.” He’s a college football analyst for ESPN. (ABC News) | Job of the day: Mashable is looking for a San Francisco-based social media reporter. Get your résumés in! (Mashable) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

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Central Florida Future newsroom

Student editors at Steven Sotloff’s old newspaper cover his captivity, execution

After Steven Sotloff, a freelance journalist who wrote for TIME and other publications, was threatened by Islamic state fighters Aug. 19, the editors at his former student newspaper scrambled to get the news out. The Central Florida Future — the weekly at the University of Central Florida where Sotloff had worked as a senior staff writer — was coming up on its Wednesday production deadline, and it had big news to report. Read more

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Bar b cue barbecue fire BBQ coal fire iron grill

Texas Monthly BBQ editor travels ‘from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket’

mediawiremorningHappy Labor Day weekend. Andrew Beaujon’s back on Tuesday. Thanks for reading this week.

  1. Ask him about his cholesterol: The nation’s only full-time barbecue editor — no, he doesn’t weigh 400 pounds — understands why readers are obsessed with his health: “My job requires that I travel from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket, one of the fattiest cuts on the steer. And I can’t forget to order the pork ribs, sausage, and beef ribs,” Daniel Vaughn writes. Former Texas Monthly editor in chief Jake Silverstein says Vaughn has “figured out how to make the barbecue lifestyle compatible with staying above ground.” (Texas Monthly)
  2. What to do when you’re arrested: Whether it happened in Ferguson or elsewhere, first you should call the station where you were booked to get your arrest report. If necessary, file a FOIA request, Kristen Hare reports. (Poynter)
  3. Ideas for redesigning breaking-news experience: Although Twitter has driven the Ferguson story, the platform could still do a better job at handling breaking news. Brandon Schmittling has some suggestions. Here’s one: “Add a check mark next to any link that you’ve already visited.” (Fast Company)
  4. James Foley’s captors waterboarded their prisoners: “The Islamic State beheaded Foley last week in apparent retaliation for U.S. airstrikes on Iraq, where the militant group has seized large swaths of territory. The group, which also controls parts of Syria, has threatened to kill another American, journalist Steven J. Sotloff.” (Washington Post) | Related: Earlier this month, Dean Baquet shifted his newsroom’s stance on calling waterboarding “torture.” (The New York Times) | Previously: The Times “tied itself in linguistic knots during the Bush years to avoid describing waterboarding as torture,” Michael Calderone wrote in 2012. (Huffington Post)
  5. HuffPost to host political debate: “Given the potential for brand growth and influence, and the migration of viewers to online video, an increasing number of newer, digital players jumping into the fray seems likely,” Joe Pompeo reports. (Capital New York)
  6. Twitter adds analytics for all: Just go to analytics.twitter.com and see how many people are really viewing and clicking your tweets. (Twitter)
  7. Are newsrooms obsessed with clicks? After two years of ethnographic research into the use of newsroom analytics, Angele Christin found journalists have a complex relationship with tracking traffic: “Many writers express cynical views about traffic and say that they do not care about page views. Yet they almost always check whether they are in the ‘top ten’ most read articles list.” (Nieman Lab)
  8. What bothers Mathew Ingram about pundits who claim the Internet is making journalism worse? “It’s the failure to appreciate that the complaints they have are the same ones that have been made about journalism for decades — combined with the unrestrained longing for some mythical golden age of journalism.” (GigaOm)
  9. ‘Rosewater’ trailer debuts: In the movie, written and directed by Jon Stewart, “Gael Garcia Bernal stars as Maziar Bahari, a journalist who was arrested and tortured in Iran for 118 days in 2009.” (Huffington Post)
  10. Newspaper front page of the day: The (New Orleans) Times-Picayune, selected by Kristen Hare. (Newseum)
    LA_TP
     
  11. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Jonathan Hunt will be global vice president for marketing and partnerships at Vox Media. Previously, he was global marketing director at Vice. (Adweek) | Kimberly Pierceall is now a gambling industry reporter for the Associated Press. Previously, she covered Irvine, California for the Orange County Register. (AP) | Ellen Crooke is now vice president of news for Gannett Broadcasting. Previously, she was news director for WXIA in Atlanta, Georgia. (Gannett) | Robert Christie is now vice president of international media for Alibaba Group. Previously, he was senior vice president of corporate communications for The New York Times Company. (Capital) | Kim Segal will be an attorney for Broward County. Previously, she was a supervising producer at CNN. (Romenesko) | Brian Balthazar will be co-executive producer at “The View.” He was head of programming at AOL. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: The AP is looking for a breaking news journalist in San Francisco. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Forecast: Digital ad revenue to jump 17% this year, magazine ad revenue to fall 11%

mediawiremorningWednesday already? Here we go.

  1. Digital ad revenue to pass TV in 2017: According to Magna Global forecasts, “television revenues are expected to grow 2.2% this year,” Nathalie Tadena writes. “Newspaper and magazine ad revenue are expected to decline 8.9% and 11% respectively, while digital ad revenues are expected to jump 17% this year to $50 billion.” (The Wall Street Journal) | “The research firm declared digital ad revenue will hit $72 billion by 2017, pulling slightly ahead of television at $70.5 billion.” (The Wrap)
  2. The perils of freelance war reporting: GlobalPost went “above and beyond” in working for James Foley’s release before he was killed by Islamic State militants, according to Medill’s Ellen Shearer. “But other freelancers may not get that kind of backing or have access to the infrastructure that a staff journalist would, she said.” (AP via NYT) | Freelance journalist Austin Tice, who has been missing for two years, is believed to be held by the Syrian government, Lara Jakes reports. (AP) | Previously: Tice “disappeared on Aug. 14, 2012, while reporting on Syria for The Washington Post and McClatchy, among other outlets.” (Poynter) | Related: Peter Theo Curtis, who was freed in Syria by extremist group al-Nusra Front on Sunday, has returned home to Boston and reunited with his mother. (AP)
  3. Online “spiral of silence”: In a Pew study, researchers found that 86 percent of U.S. adults were willing to talk about surveillance issues in-person, while just 42 percent of Twitter and Facebook users were willing to post about them on those social networks. “Overall, the findings indicate that in the Snowden case, social media did not provide new forums for those who might otherwise remain silent to express their opinions and debate issues.” (Pew Research Center) | Another interpretation, from Chris Ip: “A hesitancy to share online could actually be a valuable restraint for someone who would otherwise have shot an unthinking opinion into the digital ether, safe in the knowledge their network of followers would agree with their views.” (Columbia Journalism Review)
  4. “You could teach a whole course on Ferguson”: “We’ve seen it in other cities,” Amber Hinsley, assistant professor at St. Louis University, tells Kristen Hare. “But for St. Louis, this is really our first big story that broke on Twitter. You saw it unfold on Twitter.” (Poynter)
  5. Did you know: The domain .TV is owned by Tuvalu, a South Pacific nation, and it’s becoming a big deal for branding as sites look to capitalize on appetite for online video, Noam Cohen reports. (The New York Times)
  6. New Quartz homepage aimed at loyal visitors: It’s modeled after the site’s newsletter, Zach Seward tells Joseph Lichterman: “It’s so new, and there aren’t enough analogous products out there to really tell if we should be expecting people to just be twitchy and checking it all the time, or if they have one time in their day when they check it and it’s just that once a day.” (Nieman Lab)
  7. Nationwide Time Warner Cable outage: The Internet was down between 4:30 a.m. and 6 a.m. during “routine network maintenance,” Brian Stelter reports. Many of the homes served by TWC are in Los Angeles and New York: “That made Wednesday’s outage more noticeable, because it affected journalists and the people who employ them.” Good point. (CNN)
  8. Bigger iPad on the way? iPhones are getting bigger this year, and soon there will be a 12.9-inch version of the iPad, too. Sales of the tablet have fallen for two straight quarters. (Bloomberg) | It sounds awkward and way too big for a tablet, but Steve Kovach writes it could be a “dream device” by basically being a less “clunky and confusing” Surface Pro 3. (Business Insider) | Related: Walt Mossberg still loves tablets. (Re/code)
  9. Newspaper front page of the day: The Virginian-Pilot, selected by Kristen Hare. (Newseum)
    VA_VP
     
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Mignon Fogarty is now the Donald W. Reynolds Chair in Media Entrepreneurship at the University of Nevada, Reno. She is the founder of the Quick and Dirty Tips network. (Poynter) | Tom Cibrowski is now senior vice president of news programs, newsgathering and special events at ABC News. He was a senior executive producer at “Good Morning America.” (ABC News) | Michael Corn will be senior executive producer at “Good Morning America.” Previously, he was executive producer of “World News.” Almin Karamehmedovic will be executive producer at “World News.” Previously, he was executive producer at “Nightline.” (ABC News) | Kylie Dixon is now co-anchor for “2une In” at WBRZ in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Previously, she was an anchor at KXII in Sherman, Texas. (businessreport.com) | Les Vann is now general manager of WISH in Indianapolis. Previously, he was general manager of WJCL in Savannah, Georgia. Steve Doerr will be acting general manager for WJCL. Previously, he was northeast region vice president for Smith Media. (Lin Media) | Job of the Day: The Associated Press is looking for a news editor in Nashville, Tennessee. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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American Freed Syria

American journalist released in Syria; British officials ID man believed to be Foley’s killer

mediawiremorningHappy Monday. Andrew Beaujon is taking a much-deserved vacation. Here are some media stories.

  1. American journalist freed in Syria: On Sunday, UN peacekeepers received Peter Theo Curtis, who was kidnapped in 2012, and turned him over to the U.S. “According to German newspaper die Welt am Sonntag, ‘something was given in return for his release’.” Curtis was “reportedly held by the al-Nusra Front or by splinter groups allied with the al-Qaeda-affiliated group.” (Al Jazeera) | Previously: The U.S. declined to pay ransom for James Foley, who was killed by Islamic State militants last week. (Poynter)
  2. UK intel ID’s person believed to be Foley’s killer: And “sources have said that rampant media speculation about the identity of the killer may be off base.” (NBC News) | Medill professor Ellen Shearer on Foley’s return to the front lines: “Passion prevailed. Jim wasn’t a desk guy.” (Washington Post)
  3. Carr makes peace with Vice: In 2011, when David Carr was “bumping bellies with [Vice CEO Shane] Smith over whose coverage was worthier, I failed to recognize that in a world that is hostile to journalism in all its forms, where dangerous conflicts seem to jump off every other day, you can’t be uppity about where your news comes from.” (New York Times) | Previously: Vice CEO: Woodward and Bernstein used to be punks, too. (Poynter) | Here’s the Carr-Smith showdown from “Page One.” (YouTube)
  4. “The reality is, magazines as a print business will ultimately die,” says Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp in Gabriel Sherman’s profile of the recently spun-off company. “If we don’t transform this company, someone else will come in and do it.” (New York magazine)
  5. The homepageless Quartz gets a homepage: Visitors to qz.com will now see an “efficient briefing on global business news, called the Brief.” But it’s not “a sea of headlines,” Zach Seward writes in his introduction to the redesigned site. (Quartz) | Previously: The homepage is dead, and the social web has won—even at the New York Times. (Quartz) | Previously: 3 takeaways from the ‘death of the homepage’ and The New York Times innovation report. (Poynter)
  6. Has NYT subscriber growth stalled? Four years ago, a consulting firm estimated for The New York Times that it could reach 800,000 to 900,000 digital-only subscribers. “The problem is, the Times already hit the low end of that projection in June with 831,000 paying online readers,” Edmund Lee reports. (Re/code)
  7. Is it time to ditch native news apps? App use is growing more quickly than mobile Web use, but John McDermott argues news sites can best take advantage of that by having mobile-friendly sites that can be linked to in the apps people are actually using, like Facebook. (Digiday) | Previously: App use dominates mobile browser use, but what does that mean for news content? (Poynter)
  8. ‘We need more of a coffeehouse conversation’: That’s how NBC News president Deborah Turness explains her vision for “Meet the Press” to Bill Carter. Turness tried to make things work with host David Gregory, but “we weren’t able to build a new vision together in the end.” (New York Times) | Previously: Gregory’s replacement is Chuck Todd. (CNN)
  9. Paul Krugman saw Arcade Fire at Barclays Center: “I have to admit that the sound in a big arena is a bit murky — the bass was too loud — so it helped if you already knew and loved all the songs, which I did.” (New York Times)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Ed Reams will be news director for WKOW in Madison, Wisconsin. Previously, he was assistant news director at WISN in Milwaukee. (Wheeler Report) | Clayton Clark will be a communication specialist for St. Agnes Hospital. Previously, he was a reporter for KMPH in Fresno. (Fresno Bee) | Bob Kravitz starts today as a columnist and sports reporter at WTHR in Indianapolis. Previously, he was a sports columnist at The Indianapolis Star. (Bob Kravitz) | Job of the day: Poynter’s News University is looking for an interactive learning fellow. Get your résumés in! (Poynter) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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The last email sent to Foley’s family

mediawiremorningGood morning. Your weekend is in sight. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. James Foley’s last months: Cassandra Vinograd tells how James Foley‘s family communicated with his captors. (NBC News) | “Some messages were political and some were financial.” (CNN) | The last email sent to his family (GlobalPost) | Shane Bauer: “Like my family, [Foley's family] probably sometimes thought they should do more to try and convince his captors to let him go. Other times they likely reasoned they should stay quiet, hoping that silence would give the hostage takers the opportunity to quietly release him. It’s a hideous position to be in.” (Mother Jones) | NYT editorial: “There is no simple answer on whether to submit to terrorist extortion.” (NYT) || Foley’s family establishes journalism scholarship at Marquette. (The Wire)
  2. More Fareed Zakaria plagiarism accusations coming: @crushingbort and @blippoblappo have another post coming, they tell Poynter. (It will post here.) Here’s a taste (bigger image here) of what they say is coming:

    Gerges-Al-Qaeda
     

  3. Ferguson has become a routine: “But now the nights follow a ragged, rule-bound routine that begins before dusk, when reporters check batteries, officers check weapons, and protesters prepare to repeat their calls for accountability.” (NYT) | “Down the hill on West Florissant, people gather throughout the night — journalists, police, protesters, people who seem to just want to watch all three.” (Poynter) | “Part of the reason Twitter has been so intertwined with the news coming out of Ferguson are the social media habits of blacks and journalists.” (Politico) | Al Jazeera America freelancer Ryan L. Schuessler finds the “behavior and number of journalists [in Ferguson] so appalling, that I cannot in good conscience continue to be a part of the spectacle.” (Ryan L. Schuessler) | “Schuessler won’t name” the journalists he claims to have seen behaving badly, J.K. Trotter writes. “But we will.” (Gawker)
  4. So why can’t HuffPost pay to keep a citizen journalist in Ferguson?? Plan to crowd-source funding for Mariah Stewart to keep reporting through Beacon drew boos from journalists who wondered why HuffPost couldn’t just pay her. (Jim Romenesko) | “Readers, won’t you make a donation today to support HuffPo’s nip-slip coverage?” (AdAge) | Mathew Ingram: “the choice isn’t between HuffPo hiring Stewart and using Beacon Reader to crowdfund a salary, it’s between crowdfunding her fellowship and not doing anything.” (Gigaom)
  5. Ferguson potpourri: The best and worst data journalism that’s come out of the coverage. (CJR) | An explainer on protest leaders (Riverfront Times) | Times Public Editor Margaret Sullivan hits a story on Michael Brown‘s death: “The Times is asking readers to trust its sourcing, without nearly enough specificity or detail; and it sets up an apparently equal dichotomy between named eyewitnesses on one hand and ghosts on the other.” (NYT) | HuffPost’s Ferguson omnibus. (HuffPost) | Some of Kristen Hare‘s photos. (Poynter)
  6. Don Lemon is not having a good Ferguson: Interview with Talib Kweli goes very wrong. (Mediaite) | Discussion of weapons goes very wrong. (Gawker) | Related: “What journalists need to know about guns and gun control” (Poynter)
  7. How to sell Tumblr: The number of accounts should grow 25 percent this year. “Because many Tumblr users have multiple blogs, the number of blogs (currently 200 million) and daily posts (84.2 million) grows at a multiple to the number of users, giving the company a lot of new, mobile ad inventory — if only Yahoo can figure out a way to sell it.” (Forbes)
  8. A historic moment: Media reporter goes on vacation, and someone notices. (FishbowlDC)
  9. Oxford American plans Kickstarter campaign to fund music issue: Party Sept. 2 at South on Main in Little Rock. (Arkansas Times)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Edward Menicheschi is now president of Condé Nast Media Group. He was publisher of Vanity Fair. (Poynter) | Kim Heneghan is now vice president and general manager of money products for U.S. News and World Report. Previously, she was general manager of online at Hanley Wood, a real estate media firm. Kim Castro was named executive editor of consumer advice at U.S. News. Previously, she was managing editor for money and health there. (U.S. News) | Dan Mellon will be general manager of WJLA in Washington D.C. Previously, he was a group manager for Sinclair’s stations. Tony D’Angelo will be general manager of WSYX in Columbus, Ohio. (Sinclair Broadcast Group) | J.C. Lowe will be general manager of WEAR and WFGX in Pensacola, Florida. Previously, he was Sinclair’s general manager in Birmingham. (Sinclair Broadcast Group) | Deep Nishar, senior vice president of products and user experience at LinkedIn, is leaving the company. (LinkedIn) | Jessi Hempel is a senior writer at Wired. Previously, she was a writer for Fortune. (Jessi Hempel) | Job of the day: The National Journal is looking for an editor for its Next America project. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs). Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

A programming note: I will be on vacation Aug. 25-29. If you get this roundup by email, it will come to you from Sam Kirkland while I’m gone. Please email Sam (skirkland@poynter.org), Kristen Hare (khare@poynter.org) or Ben Mullin (bmullin@poynter.org) with tips and job moves while I’m gone. See you Sept. 2.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Veteran photojournalist talks about going into hotspots

Photojournalist Ron Haviv

Photojournalist Ron Haviv

“The entire world is appalled by the brutal murder of Jim Foley by the terrorist group, ISIL,” President Barack Obama said on Wednesday. “He reported from difficult and dangerous places, bearing witness to the lives of people a world away.”

Around the time of the speech, I was discussing the impact of honest photographic reporting on an Associated Press Photo Managers’ online panel. One the many takeaways from the panel: The role of the photojournalist is often misunderstood. These women and men see themselves as the eyes and ears of the community. One just needs to ponder the disconcerting experience of seeing this focused group of individuals who rush to the epicenter of drama and trauma while others flee for safety.

Take Ron Haviv, co-owner of VII Photo, whom I spoke with this week. He has been taken hostage three times.

He said contrary to popular opinions, all photographers covering conflict zones are not adrenaline junkies solely out to make a name for themselves.

“I say this out of experience,” Haviv said. “To some degree, going back to the war in Yugoslavia, more magazines and agencies are hesitant to put you on full assignment because the responsibility for your safety is become so great.”

“In the case of Syria it is all across the board. Some places are refusing to take work from freelancers in order to discourage them from taking such risks, some places will not look at your work until you are safely out of that region and then there are places like the GlobalPost, they will take your work and do what they can to support you, like they did for James,” referring to Foley.

No doubt the risk appears to be greater than the reward for the photojournalist, which is why Haviv and others now strongly encourage journalists be required to complete some sort of hostile environment training course or preparation.

“Seeing amazing things, and witnessing historical times and seeing the impact on different human situations is why I did what I did” for the first five years of covering conflict areas, said Haviv, who said he has documented three genocides.

Now, he said, it is about “raising awareness, moving people to action” and creating a “body of evidence” to hold people accountable.

“Through the work of credible journalists, the world is witnessing this live,” he said, “not allowing the excuse, ‘we did not know.’” Read more

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James Foley

U.S. tried to rescue James Foley

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. The U.S. tried to rescue James Foley, and it declined to pay ransom: Islamic State “pressed the United States to provide a multimillion-dollar ransom for his release,” Rukmini Callimachi reports. Unlike many European countries, the U.S. and Britain will not pay ransoms for hostages. The terror group holds other Americans, including Time freelancer Steven J. Sotloff. (NYT) | David Rohde: “The divergent U.S. and European approach to abductions fails to deter captors or consistently safeguard victims.” (Reuters) | Administration officials yesterday confirmed that U.S. Special Operations forces tried to rescue Foley, but the op “was not ultimately successful because the hostages were not present . . . at the site of the operation.” (WP) | Media blackouts “don’t necessarily end with the release of hostages,” James Harkin writes. “There are arguments for and against such blackouts, and there have been lively debates among the families of the missing about their strategic value, but in principle they seem inimical to the spirit of journalism—and potentially counterproductive.” (Vanity Fair) | “Many of those taken captive have been freelance journalists hoping to carve out careers by reporting where others had feared to tread,” Ravi Somaiya and Christine Haughney report. Washington Post Executive Editor Marty Baron “said that The Post now uses only contracted freelancers, so it can provide them the same equipment, security and communications technology that staff reporters get.” (NYT) | French journalist Nicolas Henin, who was held with Foley but released “said Foley had faced particular abuse from their jailers because he was American and his brother is in the US air force.” (AFP)
  2. How to handle the images of Foley’s death? Jack Shafer: “More likely, the videos, which our Western eyes tell us are staged for our benefit, are really aimed at the video-makers’ constituents to attract maximum attention, showcase the groups’ power, attract recruits, and build cadres – all things that the video may actually do.” (Reuters) | James Ball: “To see an outcry for Foley’s video and not for others is to wonder whether we are disproportionately concerned over showing graphic deaths of white westerners – maybe even white journalists – and not others.” (The Guardian) | Mathew Ingram: “A number of people had their [Twitter] accounts suspended after they shared the images, including Zaid Benjamin of Radio Sawa, but media outlets that posted photos did not.” (Gigaom)
  3. The guns of Ferguson: Police officer suspended for aiming gun at protesters, telling them he’d kill them. (WP) | Watch the video of #OfficerGoFuckYourself (The Wire) | NPPA filed a formal complaint with three Missouri police forces, asking for a formal investigation into an incident where photojournalist Raffe Lazarian asked a policeman “which way do I need to go in order to get to the media area?” In reply, NPPA General Counsel Mickey H. Osterreicher writes, “the officer drew his weapon and pointed it at Mr. Lazarian in a threatening manner and then used it to gesture in the direction he wanted him to go.” (Scribd) | “In a life-and-death situation, like when armed rioters are firing at police from the apartments behind the emblematic, burned-out QuikTrip in Ferguson, how can police tell once and for all who is a journalist and who isn’t?” (Riverfront Times) || MUSICIANS GET INVOLVED: Nelly spoke with Eric Holder. (NBC News) | Killer Mike and Talib Kweli talked about Ferguson on TV. (BuzzFeed) || Bloomberg Businessweek cover: “Race, Class, and The Future of Ferguson.” (@BW) | Time cover: “The Tragedy of Ferguson” (@neetzan)
  4. Poynter’s Kristen Hare is in Ferguson again today: She filed vignettes yesterday (longer piece TK) on the Post-Dispatch’s morning meeting, St. Louis Public Radio, Boston Globe reporter Akilah Johnson and local videojournalist John Miller. | Follow her on Twitter, and you’ll see plenty of pics of her turning the camera around on the media, like this photo of Wesley Lowery, Ryan Reilly and Alex Altman working in the Ferguson McDonald’s.
  5. Huffington Post will keep covering Ferguson after the circus leaves town: “With reader support, we’ll hire a local citizen journalist who’s been covering the turmoil and train her to become a professional journalist,” Ryan Grim writes. (HuffPost)
  6. How cable news covered Ferguson: “MSNBC devoted far more time to the story than its top competitors Fox News and CNN. … Our previous analysis of the 2012 killing of Trayvon Martin, another news story with strong racial undertones involving the shooting death of a black teen in Florida, found similar treatment by the three cable channels.” (Pew)
  7. Gatehouse parent company’s stock rises: Rise follows a Seeking Alpha post by VJ Shil that “rattled off a bunch of promising attributes: a nice dividend, an appealing acquisition pipeline, strong loyalty to local newspapers among small-town residents, the shedding of GateHouse’s massive mountain of debt through a recent bankruptcy.” (Boston Business Journal)
  8. Could Vox’s Chorus become a platform? Lockhart Steele: “perhaps Chorus should become a tool for more than just those of us employed at Vox Media, and a platform that transcends words in the ways that Vox Media has long since transcended just being a collection of websites? | FREEKY FLASHBACK: A pre-post-text Felix Salmon sang Chorus’ praises last year. (Reuters) | “Platisher”-coiner Jonathan Glick: “Not going to say it.” (@jonathanglick)
  9. Chicago Tribune cartoonist “doesn’t mind confounding readers”: “When a cartoonist chooses sides ‘you’re not engaging anyone,” Joe Fournier tells Michael Miner. “You’re just appeasing the side you’re committed to. It confuses the hell out of people when I don’t choose a side.” (Chicago Reader)
  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Cassie Heiter is a meteorologist at KWTV in Oklahoma City. Previously, she was a meteorologist at WQAD in Moline, Illinois. (Lacey Swope) | Matt Brickman and Kim Johnson will join WCCO 4 News This Morning in Minneapolis. Brickman currently gives weather forecasts on Saturday mornings. Johnson is currently an anchor on Saturday mornings. (CBS Minnesota) | Dan Wilson will be news director for WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida. Previously, he was interim news director there. (FTV Live) | Shellene Cockrell is now a morning anchor for KOAA in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Previously, she was a reporter for KWGN in Denver. (Colorado Springs Gazette) | Craig Melvin will be a national correspondent for the “Today Show”. Previously, he had been anchoring for MSNBC on the weekends. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: The Hill is looking for technology and cyber security reporters. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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