Articles about "Jill Abramson"


Jill Abramson writes for community paper

West Side Spirit

Jill Abramson, formerly executive editor at The New York Times, has a longread out in West Side Spirit, a paper that bills itself as “Your local paper for the Upper West Side”.

The 2,900-word article, titled “The Second Tragedy of Traffic Deaths,” examines the impunity of New York City motorists who hit pedestrians. Here’s the nut graf:

The answer is this: If you want to kill someone in New York City and get away with it, the weapon of choice should be a vehicle. It’s the perfect crime. Fewer than 7 percent of the drivers in fatal crashes that kill pedestrians are ticketed and only a tiny fraction, usually only those driving drunk, face any criminal charges.

Before she was fired from The Times earlier this year, Abramson wrote a first-person account of being hit by a delivery truck. In that story, she wrote that some of her colleagues had also been hit by drivers who did not face legal reprisal:

None of the drivers who hit us were charged by the police with any misdoing — significant because part of Mr.

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NYT edges closer to layoffs

Good morning. Almost there. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. NYT may have layoffs, after all

    A memo from Janet Elder says the news org may not have enough buyout applications to forgo layoffs. "Early efforts to handicap the outcome regrettably point to having to do some layoffs." Also, if you take the buyout, MOMA will not let you in for free anymore. (Mother Jones) | Last month Keith J. Kelly reported that more than 300 people had filed buyout applications, but many were "just securing their rights and checking it out," Guild unit rep Grant Glickson said. (NY Post) | Floyd Norris is taking the buyout. (Talking Biz News) | More N.Y. Guild news: Eight Guild members who worked at Reuters' Insider video project are losing their jobs. (The Newspaper Guild of New York) | Time Inc. has declared it's at an "impasse" with the union and "can begin unilaterally imposing many of the terms, including the right to farm out up to 60 full-time jobs while slashing vacation and medical benefits and eliminating voluntary buyout provisions from future layoffs." The Guild has asked the NLRB to investigate.

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Jill Abramson defends Alessandra Stanley: ‘You try doing that job’

Journal-isms

You’ve likely read a lot already about the Journalism and Women Symposium session with former New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson, but on Thursday morning, Richard Prince pointed out another notable moment — Abramson on Alessandra Stanley.

“…when (Washington Post) columnist Mary C. Curtis asked Abramson about September’s furor over Stanley’s labeling of television producer Shonda Rhimes an ‘angry black woman,’ Abramson said she had to ‘push back,’” Prince wrote.

Abramson said she was aware of what Stanley had written about Shonda Rhimes, but “Alessandra has been a female TV critic for a long time and all of the critics, but especially the women critics at the Times, face a hail of bullets constantly.”

“And, okay, one review she wrote might have a regrettable or ‘tone deaf’ phrase in it, but you try doing that job! It is tough to be a culture critic at the New York Times, and it’s tough to be a woman in that job…and over time I think Alessandra has become one of the most engaging critics in journalism today.”

Here’s the full video; those comments come around the 28th minute:

Related: “New York Times removes section from Alessandra Stanley ‘Today’ show review” (Poynter) Read more

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Jill Abramson falls off Forbes’ ‘Most Powerful People’ list

Forbes released its annual ranking of The World’s Most Powerful People on Wednesday, and it includes several media movers:

There are only nine women on the list of 72 (same as last year), and missing this year is The New York Times’ former executive editor, Jill Abramson. Last year, she ranked no. 68. She was not replaced by current Times editor Dean Baquet. Read more

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First Look seeks a publisher who can react ‘calmly to criticism’

Good morning. Here are 10 media stories. (Please read the note below if you’d like to keep getting this email.)

  1. Second looks at First Look

    Andrew Rice's profile of First Look Media founder Pierre Omidyar unspools the billionaire's animating interest in pandemics and Edward Snowden's revalations. It also catalogs the startup's awkward first steps. "The confusion inherent to any start-up has been exacerbated by Omidyar’s ruminative style," he writes. “I’ve never met Pierre in person,” Intercept reporter Glenn Greenwald tells Rice. (New York) | The NYT snagged a First Look solicitation for a publisher who can react "calmly to criticism and negative feedback." (NYT) | Related: Micah Lee writes about how he helped Snowden, Greenwald and Laura Poitras connect, and the dashed plans for a Snowden site called supportonlinerights.com. (The Intercept)

  2. 100,000 reasons to work on getting Jill Abramson's email address

    Writers at the startup she plans with Steven Brill "will be paid advances around $100,000 to produce stories that will be longer than long magazine articles but shorter than books," Kelly McBride reports.

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Jill Abramson

Jill Abramson startup to advance writers up to $100k for longform work

Former New York Times Executive Editor Jill Abramson shed light this weekend on her plans with Steven Brill to grow a start up.

Writers will be paid advances around $100,000 to produce stories that will be longer than long magazine articles but shorter than books, she said. There will be “one perfect whale of a story” each month and it will be available by subscription.

She discussed her plans during an hour-long keynote interview at Journalism & Women Symposium’s annual Conference and Mentoring Project. She declined to name any funders. She and Brill haven’t settled on a name yet.

She first talked about this venture two weeks ago during a WBUR event with David Carr. Brill is an award-winning long-form journalist who created Court TV, and is most recently known for his 26,000 word investigation on health care billing that became the longest piece by a single author ever run by Time Magazine. Read more

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Liberals and conservatives agree: You can’t trust BuzzFeed

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Nobody trusts BuzzFeed much: Pew’s new report on Political Polarization & Media Habits says “There is little overlap in the news sources” conservatives and liberals “turn to and trust.” The Wall Street Journal is trusted across ideological boundaries, and the BBC and The Economist do well among all but the most consistent conservatives, who say they equally trust and distrust those outlets. Only one publication is rated “More distrusted than trusted” regardless of respondents’ political outlook: BuzzFeed. It’s important to note, though, that fewer than 40 percent of respondents had heard of BuzzFeed. (Pew) | BuzzFeed EIC Ben Smith emails: “Most of the great news organizations have been around for decades, and trust is something you earn over time. Our organization is new, our news operation is even newer, and it’s early days for us. The more people know BuzzFeed News, especially young people who make up a small share of these surveys, the more they trust us.” | Brian Stelter: “Among other things, the study underscores Fox’s unique position in the media marketplace, thanks to what it calls the ‘strong allegiance’ that conservatives have to Fox.” (CNN)

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  2. Jill Abramson plans a startup with Steve Brill: Investors “sound very interested.” (The Wrap) | “Abramson and Carr now discussing their teenage pot smoking habits.
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Keller: There were 3 New York Times innovation reports

It’s All Journalism

In a podcast Friday, former New York Times Executive Editor Bill Keller said two innovation reports preceded the much publicized 2014 report by Arthur Gregg Sulzberger. Keller wrote the first in 2005 and Jill Abramson wrote the second in 2009.

Keller’s report advised that The Times had to stop treating the Web as “a secondary function,” and stated that the paper needed to “completely integrate” the digital side of the newsroom. Abramson’s report came after she “immersed herself in the web” for six months and came up with some proposals, Keller told It’s All Journalism:

What they all have in common is this kind of urgent tone. The one that I wrote in 2005 sounded like a manifesto. In fact, I wrote it sort of assuming some people would object to it, and everybody immediately said, ‘oh yeah, that’s right, I guess we better do that.’

They all make the same point, which is old media still has a ways to go to overcome the cultural and psychological habits that are rooted in the old world.

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Earns Gannett

Circulation revenue rises at Gannett’s local papers

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 (OK, perhaps slightly more than 10) media stories.

  1. Gannett had a good second quarter: Broadcast revenue was “almost 88 percent higher in the quarter compared to the second quarter last year.” Publishing advertising revenue fell about 5 percent; circulation was roughly flat, and “At local domestic publishing sites, home delivery circulation revenue was up in the quarter due, in part, to strategic pricing actions associated with enhanced content.” (Gannett)
  2. Washington Post fights the “wonk wars”: The Washington Post’s new “Storyline” project is “dedicated to the power of stories to help us understand complicated, critical things,” Editor Jim Tankersley writes. (The Washington Post) | Michael Calderone takes a look: “It’s unlikely The Post would’ve launched a project like Storyline a few years ago.” (HuffPost) | Tankersley writes that as a college student he was inspired by Richard Read‘s 1998 series about french fries: “Those stories brought the crisis home in a way no textbook or straight news piece could, because at each step, they showed how global trends touched people’s lives and livelihoods.” (The Oregonian)
  3. Why corrupt politicians should avoid Vermont: Vermont has the best-covered legislature in the country, and California has the worst, Pew finds.
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Jill Abramson doesn’t return NYT’s email

mediawiremorningGood morning. Almost there. Let’s go. Read more

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