Articles about "Jon Stewart"


After Schiller exit, an odd tension at Twitter

mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

  1. Vivian Schiller’s exit could signal tension for Twitter and journalists: Adam Sharp, who is in charge of government partnerships, will return to heading news partnerships as well. (Re/code) | “That puts him in an oddly conflicted position of advising government officials who are seeking to influence public opinion and journalists who are trying to get past that manipulation and explain what they see as the real story.” (NYT)
  2. NBC wanted Jon Stewart for “Meet the Press”: “They were ready to back the Brink’s truck up,” a source tells Gabriel Sherman. (New York) | “The revelation also underscored just how seriously [NBC News President Deborah] Turness thought about blowing up “Meet the Press,” which has fallen from first to third place in the Sunday morning political show ratings.” (CNN) | “If it’s Sunday, it’s your moment of zen.” (@chucktodd)
  3. Readers have always lied about what kinds of stories they like: “We were always ‘Facebook readers’ long before there was a Facebook.” (The Atlantic) | RELATED: Kara Swisher says, “I still think the old media hates the Internet and hopes it will go away.” (Vanity Fair)
  4. Still missing ONA? Here are a bunch of resources to help you remember: Videos. Blog posts. A photo of Poynter’s Ren LaForme with Cookie Monster. (ONA)
  5. Lots of shaved pates at The Denver Post these days: About a dozen people “shaved their heads over the weekend in solidarity with a colleague whose chic blonde hair was stolen by chemo,” Dana Coffield reports. (The Denver Post)
  6. National Press Club defends holding off-the-record events: The “press club’s director of business development, Brian Taylor, defended the defense contractors’ decision to ban press coverage even while benefiting from the prestige of the National Press Club,” Dana Milbank writes. “Sadly, the National Press Club, once a temple to the free flow of information, has been compelled to adopt the rule that drives so much else in Washington: pay to play.” (WP)
  7. NYC school police harass reporters: School safety officers tell journalists to leave “almost every time we cover a school,” Lindsey Christ reports. One broke the lensguard on an NY1 camera and put her hat over its lens. Another refused to ID himself, saying, “Stop it. Stop it, OK? Stop it. That’s who I am.” During a transaction Wednesday, “the safety officers called the local precinct,” Christ reports. “Those officers were able to explain to school safety that public sidewalks are public.” (NY1)
  8. Who is running the Atlantic’s Ello account? “Whoever is running the account is doing a bang-up job.” (The Atlantic) | Some of us are still waiting for an invite. (Sniff)
  9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: Health workers in Liberia tend to Ebola patients in safety suits on the front of The International New York Times. (Via Kiosko)

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  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Frédéric Michel will be a consultant for Sky Italia. He is Telefónica’s Europe director of public affairs and communication. (The Guardian) | Bob Mason is now vice president of hosting at NewsCycle Solutions. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Digital First Media. (Poynter) | Gregg Doyel is now a sports columnist at The Indianapolis Star. Previously, he was a columnist at CBSSports.com. (The Indianapolis Star) | Mike Stamm is now a senior design technologist at The Washington Post. Previously, he led design technology at The Wall Street Journal. Jessie Tseng is an interaction designer at The Washington Post. Previously, she was a user experience designer at Adaptly. (The Washington Post) | Sheena Lyonnais will be a freelance writer. Previously, she was managing editor of Yonge Street Media. (Yonge Street Media) | Susi Park is general manager of advertising for GQ. Previously, she was assistant general manager of advertising at Wired. (Email) | Abe Cytryn is now chief technology officer for Magzter. Previously, he was chief technology officer at Time Inc. (Email) | Job of the day: The Washington Post is looking for a religion writer. Get your résumés in! (The Washington Post) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Texas Monthly BBQ editor travels ‘from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket’

mediawiremorningHappy Labor Day weekend. Andrew Beaujon’s back on Tuesday. Thanks for reading this week.

  1. Ask him about his cholesterol: The nation’s only full-time barbecue editor — no, he doesn’t weigh 400 pounds — understands why readers are obsessed with his health: “My job requires that I travel from one end of the state to the other eating smoked brisket, one of the fattiest cuts on the steer. And I can’t forget to order the pork ribs, sausage, and beef ribs,” Daniel Vaughn writes. Former Texas Monthly editor in chief Jake Silverstein says Vaughn has “figured out how to make the barbecue lifestyle compatible with staying above ground.” (Texas Monthly)
  2. What to do when you’re arrested: Whether it happened in Ferguson or elsewhere, first you should call the station where you were booked to get your arrest report. If necessary, file a FOIA request, Kristen Hare reports. (Poynter)
  3. Ideas for redesigning breaking-news experience: Although Twitter has driven the Ferguson story, the platform could still do a better job at handling breaking news. Brandon Schmittling has some suggestions. Here’s one: “Add a check mark next to any link that you’ve already visited.” (Fast Company)
  4. James Foley’s captors waterboarded their prisoners: “The Islamic State beheaded Foley last week in apparent retaliation for U.S. airstrikes on Iraq, where the militant group has seized large swaths of territory. The group, which also controls parts of Syria, has threatened to kill another American, journalist Steven J. Sotloff.” (Washington Post) | Related: Earlier this month, Dean Baquet shifted his newsroom’s stance on calling waterboarding “torture.” (The New York Times) | Previously: The Times “tied itself in linguistic knots during the Bush years to avoid describing waterboarding as torture,” Michael Calderone wrote in 2012. (Huffington Post)
  5. HuffPost to host political debate: “Given the potential for brand growth and influence, and the migration of viewers to online video, an increasing number of newer, digital players jumping into the fray seems likely,” Joe Pompeo reports. (Capital New York)
  6. Twitter adds analytics for all: Just go to analytics.twitter.com and see how many people are really viewing and clicking your tweets. (Twitter)
  7. Are newsrooms obsessed with clicks? After two years of ethnographic research into the use of newsroom analytics, Angele Christin found journalists have a complex relationship with tracking traffic: “Many writers express cynical views about traffic and say that they do not care about page views. Yet they almost always check whether they are in the ‘top ten’ most read articles list.” (Nieman Lab)
  8. What bothers Mathew Ingram about pundits who claim the Internet is making journalism worse? “It’s the failure to appreciate that the complaints they have are the same ones that have been made about journalism for decades — combined with the unrestrained longing for some mythical golden age of journalism.” (GigaOm)
  9. ‘Rosewater’ trailer debuts: In the movie, written and directed by Jon Stewart, “Gael Garcia Bernal stars as Maziar Bahari, a journalist who was arrested and tortured in Iran for 118 days in 2009.” (Huffington Post)
  10. Newspaper front page of the day: The (New Orleans) Times-Picayune, selected by Kristen Hare. (Newseum)
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  11. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Jonathan Hunt will be global vice president for marketing and partnerships at Vox Media. Previously, he was global marketing director at Vice. (Adweek) | Kimberly Pierceall is now a gambling industry reporter for the Associated Press. Previously, she covered Irvine, California for the Orange County Register. (AP) | Ellen Crooke is now vice president of news for Gannett Broadcasting. Previously, she was news director for WXIA in Atlanta, Georgia. (Gannett) | Robert Christie is now vice president of international media for Alibaba Group. Previously, he was senior vice president of corporate communications for The New York Times Company. (Capital) | Kim Segal will be an attorney for Broward County. Previously, she was a supervising producer at CNN. (Romenesko) | Brian Balthazar will be co-executive producer at “The View.” He was head of programming at AOL. (TV Newser) | Job of the day: The AP is looking for a breaking news journalist in San Francisco. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? This week, please email me: skirkland@poynter.org. You can reach your regular roundup guy at: abeaujon@poynter.org


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Russian ‘law on bloggers’ takes effect today

mediawiremorningHello there. Sorry this isn’t Beaujon. Here are 10 or so media stories. Happy Friday!

  1. Russian blogger law goes into effect: It could crack down on free expression, Alec Luhn explains: “Popularly known as the ‘law on bloggers,’ the legislation requires users of any website whose posts are read by more than 3,000 people each day to publish under their real name and register with the authorities if requested.” (The Guardian) | “Registered bloggers have to disclose their true identity, avoid hate speech, ‘extremist calls’ and even obscene language.” (Gigaom) | The law also states that “social networks must maintain six months of data on its users.” (BBC News)
  2. More on David Frum non-faked photo fakery saga: Photo fakery surely occurs in places like Gaza, James Fallows writes. “But the claim that it has is as serious as they come in journalism.” The three words that are the “immensely powerful source of pride in what we do,” he says: “I saw that.” (The Atlantic) | Frum-related: 3 ways to prevent your apology from becoming the story, from Kristen Hare. (Poynter) | Gaza-related: Jay Rosen on why the AP revised its “members of Congress fall over each other to support Israel” tweet: “A major provider like the AP gets hit hard in the bias wars, so the principle, don’t give them ammunition! has to be built into its routines.” (Pressthink)
  3. SEC watchdog conducted lengthy leak investigation: “The SEC’s Office of Inspector General (OIG) started the investigation after Reuters published information about the regulator’s decision, taken in a closed-door meeting on Sept. 12, 2013, to settle its probe into JPMorgan Chase & Co’s massive London Whale trading loss.” Inspectors “don’t consider issues of press freedom when carrying out their investigations,” according to an OIG official. (Reuters)
  4. Media company Twitter interactions are up: The average number of Twitter interactions per month increased 159 percent between June 2013 and June 2014. John McDermott attributes that to October design tweaks that allow users to interact with retweet, reply and favorite buttons without first clicking or tapping the tweet. (Digiday)
  5. Chicago Tribune launches new website: The responsive platform — explained here by editor Gerould Kern — will be rolled out to other Tribune newspaper sites later this year, when metered paywalls will also be introduced. (Chicago Tribune) | Previously: Suggested tweets and choose-your-own adventure scrolling will be familiar to those who have visited the relaunched LA Times. (Poynter)
  6. More issues with Carol Vogel’s NYT stories? A tipster clues Erik Wemple in to three other troubling cases. But he notes “Not all eerie similarities are created equal.” (Washington Post) | A Times editor note earlier in the week acknowledges Vogel lifted part of a July 25 column from Wikipedia. (Poynter)
  7. Telegraph’s traffic up 20 percent in June: How? A “surge in Facebook traffic referral” as the Telegraph emphasized Facebook over Twitter. “It had previously been all about Twitter. Journalists are all on Twitter, and obsessed with it, so that is where the energy had gone,” Telegraph Media Group editor-in-chief Jason Seiken tells Mark Sweney. (The Guardian) | Related oldie-but-goodie: Ezra Klein tackles the “Why are journalists so obsessed with Twitter?” question. (Washington Post)
  8. Washington Business Journal won’t use the term ‘Redskins’: “I can’t dodge the question anymore,” editor-in-chief Douglas Fruehling writes in a paywalled article. (Washington Business Journal) | We’ll add them to our list of publications rejecting the football team name. (Poynter)
  9. It’s all about the clicks: “Has the Internet killed newspapers?” asks Jon Stewart. “YES!” The takeaway from this segment: Spend 15 minutes on a headline, five minutes on the article itself. (The Daily Show)
     

     

  10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Sara Just will be the executive producer of PBS NewsHour. Formerly, she was Washington deputy bureau chief for ABC News. (PBS NewsHour) | Josh Rubin will be executive producer and managing director for video at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a producer at CNN. Allen Weiner will be an editor at large at the Daily Dot. Formerly, he was a vice president of research for Gartner, Inc. (The Daily Dot) | Brandi Grissom will be enterprise editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, she was managing editor of The Texas Tribune. (@brandigrissom) | Shelby Grad will be assistant managing editor for California news at the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was city editor there. Ashley Dunn will be deputy national editor for the Los Angeles Times. Formerly, he was metro editor there. Mark Porubcansky, foreign editor for the Los Angeles Times, will be retiring. Kim Murphy, who has been named assistant managing editor for national and foreign news, will add international coverage to her responsibilities. (Los Angeles Times) | Oskar Garcia, news editor for the Associated Press in charge of coverage of Hawaii, will be AP’s east region sports editor. (Associated Press) | LaToya Valmont will be managing editor of Glamour. Formerly, she was production director there. Job of the day: The Newhouse School at Syracuse University is looking for a director of its Goldring Arts Journalism program. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

Suggestions? Criticisms? Would you like this roundup each morning? Please email abeaujon@poynter.org. Read more

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Wikipedia blackout forces Jon Stewart to turn to news outlets for SOPA information

The Daily Show
Wikipedia’s blackout to protest SOPA forced Jon Stewart to learn about the legislation another way: “With Wikipedia down, I had no choice but to turn to a notoriously unreliable source: the news,” he said, grimacing. || Related: 8 million people used Wikipedia’s tool to look up contact information for their elected officials (Techdirt) | TV news shows spotty about disclosing parent companies’ support of SOPA (The New York Times) | SOPA proponents launch TV, radio print ad campaign (Adweek) | Dilbert creator Scott Adams writes, “I have one of the most widely stolen intellectual properties in the history of the world. Emotionally, I’m okay with that. It feels like a compliment. Financially, I have no idea if piracy has hurt me in any meaningful way.”

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As ‘Daily Show’ turns 15 years old, Jon Stewart’s best media criticism moments

The longest-running show on Comedy Central debuted July 21, 1996 — 15 years ago this week. Jon Stewart became host of “The Daily Show” in 1999, and has been commenting on the media ever since. Stewart, who has often been compared to broadcast news icon Edward R. Murrow, insists he is not a journalist but holds accountable those who are. Stewart and his staff are serious about media criticism, as they told Mallary Tenore in 2009. Here are highlights of the show’s media criticism through the years. Read more

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Jon Stewart ‘apologizes’ for remark about Fox News viewers

“The Daily Show”
On Tuesday’s “Daily Show,” Jon Stewart responded to PolitiFact’s “False” verdict on his claim that Fox News watchers are “the most consistently misinformed media viewers.” Here’s an excerpt:

I may have during the ["Fox News Sunday"] interview [with Chris Wallace] mentioned that Fox News viewers are, quote, the most consistently misinformed media viewers …As it turns out I was misinformed, which should not have been surprising because I watch a lot of Fox News. … PolitiFact, the nonpartisan fact-checking guy or guys or girl, thoroughly researched my statement and they found that while in two of the surveys Fox News viewers scored the lowest, in other polls they were merely near the bottom. …

Anyway, ultimately PolitiFact declared my statement false. I defer to their judgment and I apologize for my mistake. To not do so would be irresponsible, and if I were to continue to make such mistakes and misstatements and not correct them – especially if each and every one of those misstatements happened to go in one very particular direction on the political spectrum, well that would undermine the very integrity and credibility that I work so hard to pretend to care about.

Stewart then took a look at PolitiFact’s old rulings on Fox News statements; the network didn’t do very well. On Tuesday afternoon, PolitiFact wrote about reaction to its ruling on Stewart. “The response from readers was swift and virtually unanimous. They said we were wrong. …A tiny minority of people who wrote us offered praise for our work.”
Rainey: Wallace bored in on the comedian as if he were a presidential contender
Stewart blasts sensationalism — but is that really so bad? Read more

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PolitiFact to Jon Stewart: Not true that Fox News viewers are ‘most consistently misinformed’

PolitiFact
PolitiFact, the fact-checking operation run by Poynter’s St. Petersburg Times, looked into  Jon Stewart’s statement to Chris Wallace, “Who has the most consistently misinformed media viewers? Fox. Fox viewers. Consistently. Every poll.” Louis Jacobson writes that three Pew studies “superficially rank” Fox News viewers low in knowledge of current events. But people who rely on other general-interest media also rank low, and viewers of some Fox News programs rank high (along with those who watch Stewart’s show). Two other surveys show mixed support for Stewart’s statement. Read more

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Stewart’s best lines to Wallace on ‘Fox News Sunday’

Daily Kos | Mediaite.com | Entertainment Weekly
Ken Tucker says Jon Stewart’s appearance on “Fox News Sunday” was “one of the best interviews Stewart has given articulating his views” and that the Comedy Central host “came as close as I have seen to losing his temper” when he told Chris Wallace: “Who has the most consistently misinformed media viewers? Fox. Fox viewers. Consistently. Every poll.” Here’s what else he told Wallace:

* I think that you are here in some respects to bring a credibility and an integrity to an organization that might not otherwise have it, without your presence. So, you are here as a counterweight to Hannity, let’s say, or a counterweight to Glenn Beck.

* Being a comedian is harder than what you do. What I do is much harder. I put material through a process, a comedic process.

* The embarrassment is that I’m given credibility in this world because of the disappointment that the public has in what the news media does.

* There’s no question that I don’t tell the full story. I mean, I don’t disagree with that. But I don’t not tell the full story based on a purely ideological partisan agenda.

* The bias of the mainstream media — oh, I’m not saying it’s defensible, but the bias of the mainstream media is toward sensationalism, conflict and laziness.

* I think that the majority of people working in [media] probably hold liberal viewpoints, but I don’t think that they are as relentlessly activist as the conservative movement that has risen up over the last 40 years.

Update: PolitiFact to Jon Stewart: Not true that Fox News viewers are “most consistently misinformed” Read more

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Cramer: ‘The old me would have hit Jon Stewart with a chair’

New York Times
Jon Stewart‘s “Daily Show” takedown of Jim Cramer happened more than two years ago, but the CNBC “Mad Money” host is still discussing it. He says in Sunday’s Times Magazine:

I’m proud I didn’t [hit Stewart with a chair]. I controlled myself. But maybe I shouldn’t have. Maybe I should have taken the gloves off. When Stewart talked about how his 75-year-old mother lost money in the market, I could have said: ‘Hey, your brother Larry Leibowitz is one of the heads of the New York Stock Exchange. Why didn’t he give your mom advice? Maybe I should have said that.”

For 15 long minutes, Cramer sat abjectly as Stewart pummeled him, writes Zev Chafets. Stewart accused Cramer of being a snake-oil salesman and suggested that he and his colleagues at CNBC were responsible for cheerleading Wall Street shenanigans.

I should have known this was coming because of how vicious Stewart had been all week, but I really thought it was just going to be a friendly show. As soon as he started, I realized Stewart was on a mission to make me look like a clown. I didn’t defend myself because I wasn’t prepared. What was I supposed to do, talk about how often I had been right? Praise myself? Get mad? I was mad, but I didn’t want to give the audience any blood. The national media said I got crushed, which I did, and made me into a buffoon.

After the interview, people like that, total strangers, would come up to me and say, ‘Jim, I’m sorry.’ That made me feel horrible, people feeling sorry for me. For six months it was on my mind all the time. I hurt so bad. But I don’t really think about it now.

* “Jim Cramer HIts an All-Time HIgh” [New York Times Magazine] Read more

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Is Jon Stewart the modern-day equivalent of Edward R. Murrow?

New York Times
The Comedy Central star’s push for federal funds for the health care of 9/11 responders has some making the comparison. It’s a legitimate one, says Syracuse U.’s Robert Thompson, because the law almost surely wouldn’t have moved forward without Jon Stewart‘s “advocacy satire.” || NPR.org: Even the White House took notice. || A double-myth in NYT’s story?
Alterman in 2009: Is Jon Stewart our Ed Murrow? Maybe… Read more

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